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October 3

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today? “To particularize the Articles, in an Advertisements, would be too extensive for Publication in a News-Paper.” Lengthy advertisements often appeared in the pages of colonial...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 3 Oct 2022

Sounds Wild and Broken by David George Haskell

Humanity has always been a noisy animal. As long ago as 1700 BC, a Babylonian god was complaining that the “noise of mankind has become too much./I am losing sleep over their racket.” Cities, where more than half of us now live, have only got louder....
From: Mathew Lyons on 5 Aug 2022

Herring, the Moral Economy, and the Liberal Order Framework

Elizabeth Mancke and Sydney Crain In 1819, New Brunswick’s assembly passed its first legislation regulating just the herring fishery for the “Parishes of West-Isles, Campo-Bello, Pennfield, and Saint George” in Charlotte County; two years later,...
From: Borealia on 14 Mar 2022

John Leland and a sense of humour

John Leland (image courtesy of National Portrait Gallery) A wry smile is not a gesture one would usually associate with John Leland (d. 1552), the self-styled restorer of British antiquity. We are more likely to envisage this scholar as so fearlessly...

Gruyère: The Latest Round in the Food Culture Wars

Food is Culture! This proclamation is a both a popular idea and a serious anthropological approach to food, cuisine, and agricultural production. Food historians take the cultural dimensions of food production and consumption seriously as revealing important...

History of Sleep in Medieval and Early Modern Europe

Nothing could seem more “natural” than our rhythms of sleep, yet there is a history of sleep. Historians have recognized various changes in sleeping patterns in the modern industrialized and post-industrial world, which have also been studied by scientists....

Cooch’s Bridge, Delaware’s Only Revolutionary War Battle

On December 5, 2018, the State of Delaware announced that it had acquired the historic property at Cooch’s Bridge, site of the only Revolutionary... The post Cooch’s Bridge, Delaware’s Only Revolutionary War Battle appeared first on Journal of the...

Reading the Gardens at Vallée aux Loups

Age of Revolutions is happy to present its “Art of Revolution” series. You can read through the entire series here as they become available. By Kyra Sanchez Clapper Like the transitionary periods between philosophical movements, private gardens...
From: Age of Revolutions on 29 Nov 2021

Geckos, Environmental History, and the Trans-Atlantic Slave Trade

Historians are collaborating with scientists in new ways these days, especially in the growing field of environmental history. Scholars are making new and fascinating discoveries about the long history of human transformations of environments. Historians...

Painting Kandimalal

By Kevin Robertson (Curtin University) Emotional expression in painting is something that I have been looking at for many years. As an artist who lived through the postmodern era, I wondered why expression was something that was no longer considered...
From: Histories of Emotion on 2 Aug 2021

Liberty, Utility, Proximity: Animals and Animaliers at the Jardin des Plantes Menagerie in Paris

This article is a part of our “Revolutionary Animals” series, which examines the roles of animals in revolution, representations of revolutionary animals, and the intersections between representation and the lived experiences of animals. By Maria...
From: Age of Revolutions on 26 Jul 2021

Absolute Animals: The Royal Menagerie and the Royal Labyrinth at Versailles

This article is a part of our “Revolutionary Animals” series, which examines the roles of animals in revolution, representations of revolutionary animals, and the intersections between representation and the lived experiences of animals. By Peter...
From: Age of Revolutions on 19 Jul 2021

Centre for Ancient Cultural Heritage & Environment Fellowships Closing Soon!

CACHE is offering two fellowships for the second half of 2021 in the fields of archaeological science, cultural heritage, and/or environmental heritage. Applications close Tuesday 6th July 2021. CACHE Early Career Indigenous Australian Research Fellowship...
From: ANZAMEMS Inc on 29 Jun 2021

A History of the End of the World

Stephen Basdeo is a writer and historian based in Leeds, UK, and is interested in all aspects of social and cultural history, especially the 18th and 19th century. From Thomas Campbell’s The Last Man (1825) Introduction In 1825 Thomas Campbell...

A valuable ancient commodity: Miltos of Kea

By Effie Photos-Jones The island of Kea in the North Cyclades is by some travel agents’ reckoning the (rich) Athenians’ ‘best-kept secret’, their beautifully-designed stone-built villas merging seamlessly with the barren landscape overlooking...
From: The Recipes Project on 3 Jun 2021

Eugene Sue’s Epic Socialist Novel “The Mysteries of the People” (1848): “The Iron Collar” and “The Silver Cross”

Stephen Basdeo In 1848 the master of the “mysteries” novels, Eugene Sue, began the weekly serialisation of a new novel: Mysteries of the People. It was a chronicle of a proletarian family—originally the Brenn clan—and their...

The Geffrye Almshouses in The Kingsland Road, Shoreditch, Part I, by Tony Grant

The early life of Robert Geffrye leads to his establishment of the almshouses in Shoreditch in the 18th century that housed the poor in London.
From: Jane Austen's World on 15 May 2021

New Research at Cahokia Mounds Site in Illinois

New archaeological excavations at Cahokia, Illinois, have been investigating evidence of deforestation and flooding at the site of a major indigenous urban center. The New York Times reports that “A thousand years ago, a city rose on the banks...

M.P. Shiel’s “The Purple Cloud” (1901)

By Stephen Basdeo The book was a legend … out of space, out of time … he had the character of a poet and a prophet — a prophet, I mean, in the Old Testament sense.[1] Those words above were used by the poet Edward Shanks (1892–1953)...

Thorson on “Stone Walls on Minute Man,” 27 Feb.

On Saturday, 27 February, the Friends of Minute Man National Park will host its free Winter Lecture, this time beamed through the walls of our own homes. This year Prof. Robert Thorson will speak about “The Stone Walls of Minute Man National Park.”...
From: Boston 1775 on 25 Feb 2021

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