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Your search for posts with tags containing james v found 36 posts

Book Review: ‘Legacy’ by John Pilkington

The Gunpowder Plot is one of those major subjects of the early Stuart era (the Jacobean period) that people tend to know about, but, in my experience, very few historical fiction works focus on the period just after that. In John Pilkington’s novel...
From: The Seventeenth Century Lady on 1 Aug 2021

African Americans in the American Revolution

Editor’s note: Originally published in JAR in May 2013, the late Thomas Fleming (1927–2017) wrote this important article about the contribution of African Americans... The post African Americans in the American Revolution appeared first on...

Colonel Henry Jackson Accused by His Junior Officers of Misconduct at the Battle of Monmouth Court House

In my study of Major General Charles Lee, who commanded Continental Army troops at the fascinating Battle of Monmouth Court House, I argue that... The post Colonel Henry Jackson Accused by His Junior Officers of Misconduct at the Battle of Monmouth Court...

Tapping America’s Wealth to Fund the Revolution: Two Good Ideas that Went Awry

“Unless some great and capital change suddenly takes place,” Gen. George Washington wrote from Valley Forge on December 23, 1777,[1] to Henry Laurens, the... The post Tapping America’s Wealth to Fund the Revolution: Two Good Ideas that...

Mary of Modena

In 1673, Mary of Modena married James, who would go on to become James VII & II (King of Scotland, England and Ireland) twelve years later, before being deposed in 1688. In the same year that her husband was deposed, Mary gave birth to a son...
From: Culloden Battlefield on 14 Apr 2018

From Watchung to the Hudson: Sergeant Simon Giffin’s Summer of 1777

On June 28, 1777 elements of the 9th Connecticut Regiment that had been fighting with General Washington’s army in New Jersey departed Lincoln Gap... The post From Watchung to the Hudson: Sergeant Simon Giffin’s Summer of 1777 appeared first...

The 1st Rhode Island Regiment and Revolutionary America’s Lost Opportunity

As the battered Continental Army encamped in Valley Forge for the winter of 1777-1778 after a year of setbacks and defeats, Gen. James Varnum,... The post The 1st Rhode Island Regiment and Revolutionary America’s Lost Opportunity appeared first...

Testimony of James Stewart, A Wishaw Covenanter Hanged in 1681 #History #Scotland

  The Testimony of James Stewart, domestic servant to Thomas Steuart in Coltness in the parish of Cambusnethan, who was hanged at the Gallowlee, betwixt Edinburgh and Leith, on 10 October, 1681. ‘Dear Friends—I being in prison for Christ,...
From: Jardine's Book of Martyrs on 8 Dec 2017

Testimony of John Potter Executed at Edinburgh’s Mercat Cross 1 December, 1680 #History #Scotland

The Testimony of John Potter, a Farmer, who lived in the parish of Uphall in Linlithgowshire, and suffered at the Mercat Cross of Edinburgh, December 1, 1680. ‘All you spectators and auditors, I desire your attention to a few words, and I shall...
From: Jardine's Book of Martyrs on 1 Dec 2017

The Order of the Thistle

The Order of the Thistle is the highest order that can be given in Scotland and is said to have been established by King James VII & II in 1687. It is believed that James established the Order to help engage with, and maintain his close relationship...
From: Culloden Battlefield on 25 Aug 2017

Review: Arbella Stuart – The Uncrowned Queen by Jill Armitage

Arbella Stuart: The Uncrowned Queen by Jill Armitage, published by Amberley Publishing in 2017, (the title on Goodreads is Arbella Stuart: England’s Almost Queen) takes readers back to the reign of Queen Elizabeth I and begins with the formidable...
From: The Seventeenth Century Lady on 1 Jun 2017

From Slaves to Soldiers at Rhode Island State House, 24 Jan.

On Tuesday, 24 January, the Rhode Island State House Library will host a book signing to celebrate the publication of From Slaves to Soldiers: The 1st Rhode Island Regiment in the American Revolution, by Robert A. Geake with Lorén M. Spears. Here’s...
From: Boston 1775 on 21 Jan 2017

8 December 1542: The Birth of Mary, Queen of Scots

On 8 December 1542, a princess was born to Scotland. At Linlithgow Palace, Queen Marie de Guise, consort to James V of Scotland, delivered a daughter, who was named Mary; she would be their only surviving child. Six days later, Mary became queen of Scotland,...
From: Conor Byrne on 8 Dec 2016

The Lost Heir: Henry Frederick, Prince of Wales

Everyone has heard of Charles I of England, who was beheaded in 1649 for high treason. Not everyone, however, has heard of Charles's elder brother, Henry Frederick. This 'faire and strong' Prince of Wales, as described by the prince's chaplain Dr. Daniel...
From: Conor Byrne on 24 Oct 2016

Robert Carey’s Ride: Guest Post by Josh Provan

I’ve travelled from England to Scotland so many times since I was a kid I’ve lost count. Perhaps that is why I find Robert Carey’s ride so interesting. But it was when I was standing before the gates of Richmond Palace, the place where...
From: The Seventeenth Century Lady on 25 May 2016

John Howland and the Lexington Alarm in Providence

Yesterday I quoted Elkanah Watson’s description of how Providence, Rhode Island, responded to the Battle of Lexington and Concord. According to Watson, the news arrived on the afternoon of 19 Apr 1775, his militia unit spent the whole night equipping...
From: Boston 1775 on 22 Apr 2016

Elkanah Watson and the Lexington Alarm in Providence

I previously quoted the part of Elkanah Watson’s Men and Times of the Revolution in which he described his military training as a schoolboy in Rhode Island. Watson, born in 1758, was still a teenager when the Battle of Lexington and Concord occurred....
From: Boston 1775 on 21 Apr 2016

A gypsy named James Venus

The Boss family, notorious gypsy horse thieves and dealers, plied their dubious trade across throughout Norfolk and Suffolk, into Northamptonshire and Lincolnshire and further afield into Yorkshire. The family used various aliases, including Heron (Hearne)...
From: All Things Georgian on 28 Jul 2015

David Cardinal Beaton, RIP

On May 29, 1546 the Cardinal Archbishop of St. Andrews, David Beaton, the last Catholic Cardinal named before the Scottish Reformation erupted, was murdered at St. Andrew's Castle. According to the Catholic Encyclopedia, Beaton was very much involved...

King James VI/I and Witches in Scotland and England

The Tea at Trianon blog features a post about James VI of Scotland (and I of England) and his fear of witches and witchcraft. Tracy Borman writes about how he acted upon that obsession in law and literature: There was thus a fertile ground for James's...

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Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.