The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "joy"

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Your search for posts with tags containing joy found 22 posts

Baron d’Holbach brought back to the motherland by a ‘joyous sett’

Ruggero Sciuto, Baron d’Holbach (on the screen), Nicholas Cronk. He was ‘the most learned nobleman’ in Paris according to Laurence Sterne, ‘un des hommes de son temps les plus instruits, sachant plusieurs des langues de l’Europe’...
From: Voltaire Foundation on 6 Aug 2019

December 6

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today? South-Carolina Gazette and Country Journal (December 6, 1768).“A List of the Person’s Names may be seen affixed to the Directions.” According to their advertisements,...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 6 Dec 2018

July 5

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today? South-Carolina Gazette and Country Journal (July 5, 1768).“EDWARD JOYCE’s famous Great American BALSAM.” Like many other colonial American printers, Charles Crouch...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 5 Jul 2018

Lough Sydney in the early 17th century.

More Information Here: https://www.bbc.com/news/uk-northern-ireland-44675008
From: A Woodsrunner's Diary on 2 Jul 2018

The Woman in the Moon: Interviews with the Cast

During rehearsals for James Wallace’s The Dolphin’s Back production of John Lyly’s The Woman in the Moon (Shakespeare’s Globe, Sam Wanamaker Playhouse) back in August 2017, we had time to catch up with a few of the cast...
From: Before Shakespeare on 14 Dec 2017

In Memoriam: Joyce Appleby (1929-2016)

Michael D. Hattem offers a memoriam to Joyce Appleby (1929-2016).
From: The Junto on 30 Dec 2016

Andrea Ammonio, protégé of Pietro Carmeliano

History without palaeography is a story half told. Here is a small example from the first decades of the sixteenth century. It comes from my monograph on The Renaissance Reform of the Book and Britain which I am presently completing. I present to you,...

Shakespeare Out of Europe

Shakespeare Out of Europe By Graham Holderness From Will to the world by Peter Brookes. Radio Times 20-26 Sept. 1986 I remember a time when British culture among the educated was thoroughly European. Everyone listened to French music, wore Italian clothes,...
From: Blogging Shakespeare on 2 Sep 2016

Three firsts (and three cheers) for the three parts of Henry VI

It finally happened. I started dreaming about Shakespeare. It came in a very peculiar, decidedly non-bardic form, though: a tweet. BREAKING: French slay English General John Talbot at battle in Bordeaux. In my bizarre, cyber-medieval dreamscape, these...
From: Shakespeare Confidential on 4 Aug 2016

Astrophil and Stella, Sonnet 101

Stella is sick, and in that sickbed lies Sweetness, that breathes and pants as oft as she; And grace, sick too, such fine conclusions tries That sickness brags itself best graced to be. Beauty is sick, but sick in so fair guise That in that...
From: Blogging Sidney's Sonnets on 13 May 2016

‘The Wages of Sin is a Month in the Locke’: Irish Modernism and the Politics of Venereal Disease

The Perceptions of Pregnancy blog, like the Researchers’ Network, aims to reach beyond boundaries and borders, and to facilitate an international and interdisciplinary conversation on pregnancy and its associated bodily and emotional experiences from...
From: Perceptions of Pregnancy on 29 Feb 2016

Q&A with Dane Morrisson, Author of True Yankees

The following is an interview with Dane A. Morrison, about his recently-released book, True Yankees: the South Seas & the Discovery of American Identity (Johns Hopkins).  Morrison is Professor of History at Salem State University (MA). JP: I could...
From: The Junto on 18 Dec 2014

Astrophil and Stella, Sonnet 48

Soul’s joy, bend not those morning stars from me, Where virtue is made strong by beauty’s might, Where love is chasteness, pain doth learn delight, And humbleness grows one with majesty. Whatever may ensue, O let me be Co-partner of the riches of...
From: Blogging Sidney's Sonnets on 2 May 2014

Elizabeth 1 and her people

Our fascination with the Elizabethan and Jacobean periods shows no sign of abating.  Lives of the monarch and courtiers have always been recorded but in recent years it’s apparent that there is much evidence for the lives of ordinary citizens too...
From: The Shakespeare blog on 21 Oct 2013

Prince Edward Island’s Colonial Fort

July 4th may be a time of festivities in the United States but on Prince Edward Island (PEI) it’s just another day with Canada Day celebrations falling on the 1st. Wanting to do something related to Independence Day, my wife donned her red, white, and...

Harvey Pekar & Joyce Brabner’s Our Cancer Year

Cover of graphic novel Dear friends and readers, As those people who read my Sylvia blog know, my husband, Jim (“the Admiral”), was diagnosed with esophageal cancer this past April 28th, and he and I have been coping ever since. He had major...
From: Ellen And Jim Have A Blog, Two on 3 Jul 2013

Berlin, Day 1: Don Juan (Moliere/Pollesch), Volksbühne

Off the plane, into a theatre: and how. The Volksbühne, perhaps the most iconoclastic of Berlin’s publicly funded theatres, launched a three-part Moliere project this year. Of the three productions, one (The Miser, directed by Frank Castorf) is...
From: dispositio on 2 May 2013

The living and the dead

'One would not easily believe that corpses come out of their graves and wander around to terrorize the living, were there not so many cases supported by ample testimony.' This BBC documentary from the series Inside the Medieval Mind spends some...
From: Magia Posthuma on 10 Feb 2013

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Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.