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Showing 1 - 20 of 1968

Your search for posts with tags containing king found 1968 posts

William Dickens, John Rose, and William Turnbull

It is often believed or reported that the 2nd New York Regiment of 1775, commanded by Col. Goose Van Schaick, morphed into the 1st... The post William Dickens, John Rose, and William Turnbull appeared first on Journal of the American Revolution.

“Massachusetts Revolts!” at HistoryAuthorTalks, 4 Aug.

On Tuesday, 4 August, I’ll participate in an online conversation on the theme “Massachusetts Revolts!: How the Feisty New England Protests Changed the World.”This event is the latest digital discussion among historians to be organized...
From: Boston 1775 on 31 Jul 2020

“America’s Summer Road Trip,” 1 Aug.

When History Camp Boston and then other History Camps had to be canceled this year because of the pandemic, the organizers of The Pursuit of History looked for another way to share historical information with the public. Lee Wright and Carrie Lund have...
From: Boston 1775 on 30 Jul 2020

Primordial Matter

16th century Mining practices, from Agricola, De Re MetallicaIn the early seventeenth century, Florentine priest Antonio Neri wrote the first printed book devoted to formulating glass from raw materials. His work is called L'Arte Vetraria, which...
From: Conciatore on 17 Jul 2020

Creating Order: Rufus King and the Nascent American Republic

On the afternoon of April 30, 1789, George Washington stepped onto the balcony of the freshly-renovated and renamed Federal Hall on Wall Street in... The post Creating Order: Rufus King and the Nascent American Republic appeared first on Journal of the...

Teach my Research: Food, Colonization, and Religion in New France

Mairi Cowan and Whitney Hahn [Teach My Researchis a new occasional series at Borealiato help connect research and teaching, putting the latest scholarship on early Canadian history–Indigenous, French, British, or early national, to about 1900–into...
From: Borealia on 13 Jul 2020

Did Yellow Fever Save the United States?

To Thomas Jefferson, great plagues were within the genus of republican antibodies. Like the occasional popular insurrection that warned rulers “the spirit of resistance”... The post Did Yellow Fever Save the United States? appeared first on...

July 6

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today? “At the Sign of the Marquis of Rockingham.” In early July 1770, Thomas Achincloss placed an advertisement in the New-Hampshire Gazette to inform consumers that he sold...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 6 Jul 2020

Smugglers, Pirates, and Patriots: Free Trade in the Age of Revolution

Smugglers, Pirates, and Patriots: Free Trade in the Age of Revolution by Tyson Reeder. University of Pennsylvania Press, 2019 America’s struggle for liberty ushered... The post Smugglers, Pirates, and Patriots: Free Trade in the Age of Revolution...

Isolation, Loneliness and Risk Taking in Medieval Icelandic Outlaw Sagas

By Matthew Firth and James Kane, Flinders University In recent months, ‘isolation’ has become part of our core vocabulary. For many of us, COVID-19 has imposed our first experience of widespread social isolation. However, among medieval North...
From: Histories of Emotion on 2 Jul 2020

Perspectives on Boston’s 1764 Smallpox Epidemic

On 13 Apr 1764, John Adams sent his fiancée Abigail a story about being inoculated against smallpox in Boston. Through a cousin of Abigail’s, Dr. Cotton Tufts, Adams and his brother had received a referral to Dr. Nathaniel Perkins. At first...
From: Boston 1775 on 29 Jun 2020

Documents of the Revolution: A Continuum of Conviction

Those familiar with American history know that the Articles of Confederation served as the first constitution of the unified states during the American Revolution.... The post Documents of the Revolution: A Continuum of Conviction appeared first on Journal...

‘Beyond too much’: Shakespearean excesses in the 18th century

From the mid-1750s an unprecedented Anglophilia took hold of Europe. It manifested itself throughout Germany from the mid-1770s onwards with the rampant ‘Hamlet fever’, which succeeded and fed on an earlier ‘Werther fever’. It...
From: Voltaire Foundation on 25 Jun 2020

This Week on Dispatches: Geoff Smock on the Influence of the Enlightenment on Thomas Jefferson

On this week’s Dispatches host Brady Crytzer interviews teacher and JAR contributor Geoff Smock on Thomas Jefferson’s enlightenment-influenced views of  pandemics, the French Revolution, Shays’... The post This Week on Dispatches:...

Getting creative. Did Shakespeare write King Lear in lockdown?

The title page of the First Folio, 1623 When lockdown was first imposed, in March 2020, it was pointed out that Shakespeare had written King Lear while under lockdown himself during a period when the theatres were closed because of plague, in 1605-6....
From: The Shakespeare blog on 17 Jun 2020

This Week on Dispatches: Keith Muchowski on Rufus King, Forgotten Founder

On this week’s Dispatches host Brady Crytzer interviews professor and librarian Keith Muchowski on Rufus King, forgotten founder. Thousands of readers like you enjoy the articles... The post This Week on Dispatches: Keith Muchowski on...

What Goes Around Comes Around

The German city of Ulm in the 16th centuryGeorg Braun, Franz Hogenberg 1570-78(Click image to enlarge.)In the spring and summer of 1525, peasants and farmers throughout German speaking Europe staged a popular revolt now called the Deutscher Bauernkrieg....
From: Conciatore on 10 Jun 2020

The (Failed) French Revolution against Medical Expertise and Foucault’s Philosophy of History

This piece is a part of our ongoing series, entitle “Rethinking the Revolutionary Canon.”  By Blake Smith Capitalist democracy has a problem with public health. The premises of political and economic liberalism, which organize society...
From: Age of Revolutions on 8 Jun 2020

June 7

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today? “American manufactured, BROWN and mixed coloured THREAD STOCKINGS.” Advertisers considered “Buy American” a powerful appeal that would resonate with consumers...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 7 Jun 2020

‘Revolutions So Remote’: Revolutionary Thinking and Archaeological Inquiry

This piece is a part of our ongoing series, entitle “Rethinking the Revolutionary Canon.”  By Catherine J. Frieman The Marxist archaeologist V. Gordon Childe was among the highest profile archaeologists of the twentieth century. In the...
From: Age of Revolutions on 1 Jun 2020

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Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.