The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "labor"

Showing 1 - 20 of 97

Your search for posts with tags containing labor found 97 posts

Eiffel and the Telling of Technological Stories

By Patrick De Oliveira Roland Barthes described the Eiffel Tower as “a universal symbol of Paris.”[1] Built to celebrate both the French Revolution’s centennial and the nineteenth century’s sweeping industrial transformations, the Tower can...
From: Age of Revolutions on 23 May 2022

Washington at the Plow: The Founding Father and the Question of Slavery

BOOK REVIEW: Washington at the Plow: The Founding Father and the Question of Slavery by Bruce A. Ragsdale (Belknap Press of Harvard University Press, 2021)... The post Washington at the Plow: The Founding Father and the Question of Slavery appeared first...

December 5

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today? “JOHN SIMNET, of London, WATCH-FINISHER.” Nearly six months had passed since John Simnet last placed an advertisement in the New-York Journal, but he concluded the year by placing...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 5 Dec 2021

Cassava: A Contested Good

Brandi Simpson Miller The widescale adoption of cassava in Ghana today has its roots in the nineteenth-century transition away from the slave trade to the “legitimate” trade in the palm oil that lubricated British industry. Cassava was introduced...
From: The Recipes Project on 5 Aug 2021

“You know I am no epicure”: Enslaved Voices in Eliza Lucas Pinckney’s Receipt Book

By Rachel Love Monroy The Papers of the Revolutionary Era Pinckney Statesmen The Pinckney Papers Project at the University of South Carolina includes both the Papers of Eliza Lucas Pinckney (1722-1793) and Harriott Pinckney Horry (1748-1830) and The Papers...
From: The Recipes Project on 8 Apr 2021

Homework for Table Talks II

Texts and Rationales for Table Talks II: New Approaches to Romantic Studies and Society The first Table Talks event went with a bang before Christmas. You can still check out the recording here. Our next event in June promises to be just as exciting...
From: The Romantic Ridiculous on 31 Mar 2021

Bulk Medicine and Waged Labor in Eighteenth-Century London

By Zachary Dorner In the eighteenth century, druggists, chemists, and apothecaries began producing medicines in larger quantities for sale in a variety of markets, resulting in a more coherent manufacturing sector in Britain. Making medicines at...
From: The Recipes Project on 24 Dec 2020

Historical knitting through citizen science

Knitted stockings were one of the important Renaissance technological innovations. While woollen stockings were widely available across social classes, stockings knitted of fine silk yarn were expensive luxury products and one of the key fashion accessories...
From: Refashioning the Renaissance on 11 Dec 2020

‘Don’t Be Ridiculous!’

A ridiculous review of Robin Stevens’ A Murder Most Unladylike Mystery series Robin Stevens, Death Sets Sail (London: Puffin, 2020) Daisy Wells and Hazel Wong, schoolgirl detectives in the late 1930s (the Golden Age of both Crime Fiction and...
From: The Romantic Ridiculous on 18 Aug 2020

VIDEO: Re-Reading Milton Re-Reading Shakespeare (SRS • June 30, 2020)

Yesterday, Jason Scott-Warren (Cambridge University) and I presented some updated findings about—and readings of—the marked up copy of Mr William Shakespeares Comedies, Histories, and Tragedies (1623), aka the First Folio, housed in the Rare...

January 19

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today? “TO BE SOLD AT William Scott’s Store.” When it came to disseminating his advertisements widely, William Scott was more industrious than most merchants, shopkeepers,...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 19 Jan 2020

Experiencing Historical Techniques through the Color Black at the ROOHTS Summer School

By Sharifa Lookman As October draws to a close, we feature yet another exciting article from our ongoing series of cross-postings on the hands-on, collaborative research project into recipes for Burgundian Black, organized by Dr. Jenny Boulboullé....
From: The Recipes Project on 1 Nov 2019

Learning from a “Living Source” in Working with Historical Recipes: Reflections on the Burgundian Blacks Collaboratory

By Jessie Wei-Hsuan Chen This week, we continue our series of cross-postings on a fascinating hands-on, collaborative research project into recipes for Burgundian Black, organized by Dr. Jenny Boulboullé. In today’s selection, we hear from...
From: The Recipes Project on 15 Oct 2019

Milton's Shakespeare: A Digest of Media Coverage

Suggested emendations to the text of ‘Romeo & Juliet’ in the Free Library of Philadelphia’s First Folio. [Reproduced with kind permission of the Free Library of Philadelphia’s Rare Book Department.] ...

With(out) Milton: Dating the Annotations in the Free Library of Philadelphia's First Folio

Detail of manuscript emendation and bracketing in the Free Library of Philadelphia’s copy of Mr William Shakespeares Comedies, Histories, & Tragedies (1623). [Image reproduced with kind permission of the Free Library of Philadelphia.] ...

How to tell a Serf from a Slave in Medieval England

By Sara M. Butler; posted 15 August 2019. About six months ago, I stumbled across an intriguing 2011 article by Stephen Alsford on the subject of medieval serfdom and the myth that “town air makes free” – that is, escape to a town for...
From: Legal History Miscellany on 15 Aug 2019

Q&A with James Parisot

Following up yesterday’s review by Lindsay Keiter, today The Junto interviews James Parisot, author of How America Became Capitalist: Imperial Expansion and the Conquest of the West (Pluto, 2019). James teaches in the Department of Sociology at...
From: The Junto on 25 Jun 2019

Flora Tristan: Radical Socialist, Feminist, and First Internationalist

By Kevin Duong In the summer of 1843, French feminist and activist Flora Tristan published a short book, L’Union ouvrière, or The Workers’ Union. Progressive French publishers panned the book. They cited its argument with sympathy,...
From: Age of Revolutions on 17 Jun 2019

Coral, Labor, Slavery, and Silence in the Archives

“Revolutionary Material Culture Series” This series examines the Age of Revolutions through its material markers, reminding us that materials themselves reflected and shaped political cultures around the revolutionary Atlantic and World. By...
From: Age of Revolutions on 22 Apr 2019

Page 1 of 512345Last »

Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.