The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "law"

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Your search for posts with tags containing law found 801 posts

“Compleat Quarters were provided for all the troops”

Yesterday we left Gov. Francis Bernard stymied by both Boston’s justices of the peace and the Massachusetts Council in his effort to secure barracks for the king’s troops in Boston closer than Castle William. By his own account, Bernard told...
From: Boston 1775 on 2 Nov 2018

Roundtable: The History of Childhood & Youth: Holly N.S. White

If you missed previous posts in our new roundtable series on the history of childhood and youth, click here. On Mondays, Wednesdays, and Fridays for the next few weeks, stop by to read about challenges and realities of researching and teaching childhood...
From: The Junto on 2 Nov 2018

“Your Excellency will therefore excuse our doing anything”

During the conflict over the Manufactory building, Gov. Francis Bernard was still pushing other ways to find housing for the two-plus regiments in town.The governing law was the Quartering Act of 1765. That required colonies to provide barracks for army...
From: Boston 1775 on 1 Nov 2018

“The Negroes shall be free, and the Liberty Boys slaves”?

As I described back here, on the night of 28 Oct 1768 Capt. John Willson of the 59th Regiment was reportedly heard “to persuade some Negro servants to ill-treat and abuse their masters, assuring them that the soldiers were come to procure their...
From: Boston 1775 on 31 Oct 2018

PLEASE, sign this petition.

A Muzzleloader Is Not Considered A Firearm In America.Modern muzzleloaders are considered “antique firearms” as they are replicas of pre-20th Century designs, with certain other limitations.In fact, the Gun Control Act of 1968 defines an antique...
From: A Woodsrunner's Diary on 30 Oct 2018

Levi Ames and the Clarke Family’s Silver

The Revolution250 coalition has a Twitter account and a Facebook page. I’m one of the people who contributes to those feeds, promoting upcoming events and celebrating past ones, like the “Boston Occupied” reenactment earlier this month....
From: Boston 1775 on 24 Oct 2018

L’île aux démons: cartographie d’un mirage

[This is the fifith essay of the Borealia series on Cartography and Empire–on the many ways maps were employed in the contested imperial spaces of early modern North America.]  Alban Berson On serait bien en peine de pointer sur une...
From: Borealia on 24 Oct 2018

“The Soldiers were withdrawn”

On 22 Oct 1768, 250 years ago today, the Boston Whigs had a surprise to report:This morning we are told that the sheriff [Stephen Greenleaf], whom to carry on the allusion we will call the General, has raised the siege of the Manufactory, with the trifling...
From: Boston 1775 on 22 Oct 2018

“This day the Sheriff got into the Factory House”

On 20 Oct 1768, 250 years ago today, John Rowe wrote in his diary:This day the Sheriff got into the Factory House. That line left out a lot of drama, I have to say.According to the Boston Whigs, the day began with the royal governor pressing yet another...
From: Boston 1775 on 20 Oct 2018

“His honour the Lieut. Governor, condescended to come”

And speaking of Lt. Gov. Thomas Hutchinson, on 19 Oct 1768—250 years ago today—he entered the conflict over the Manufactory House in Boston. Even before the regiments arrived, some army officers had scouted that big, province-owned building...
From: Boston 1775 on 19 Oct 2018

Philosophical Explosion

Glass drops demonstration in slow motion(Starts after the ad)Previously, we started a tour through Europe that followed the introduction of an item called a "glass drop,"  "Prince Rupert's drop" or "Dutch tear." [1] Today we will explore the attempt...
From: Conciatore on 19 Oct 2018

“The whole was a Scene of perversion”

On 17 Oct 1768, 250 years ago today, Gov. Francis Bernard and Gen. Thomas Gage teamed up in the Town House to force the issue of where the king’s troops in Boston would live.The governor later sent this report on their effort to the Secretary...
From: Boston 1775 on 17 Oct 2018

Upcoming Events of Interest in Salem and Taunton

Sometimes it’s good to get away from the crowded Boston Common of 1768, so here are a couple of interesting historical events taking place elsewhere in Massachusetts.On Wednesday, 17 October, and then again on Wednesday, 24 October, the Salem Maritime...
From: Boston 1775 on 16 Oct 2018

Reply to Benoît Grenier and Alain Laberge

Allan Greer I am grateful to Benoît Grenier and Alain Laberge for having taken the trouble to read my book and comment on my short polemic, “There was no Seigneurial System.” Indeed, I’m doubly grateful since I relied heavily on...
From: Borealia on 16 Oct 2018

Firearms Regulations. Public Safety, Ignorance, or Just Bloody Mindedness?!!!

Firearms License Categories NSW Australia.Take a look at the various guns in these categories. Why are muzzle-loaders placed on a “B” class license with Center-fire firearms? Why are muzzle-loading pistols placed on an “H” class...
From: A Woodsrunner's Diary on 16 Oct 2018

Bat, Cat & Mat, or, How happy could I be with either

Caricature with Queen Caroline on the arms of Bergami (left) and Alderman Wood (right), jubilant on the sidewalk before the door of “Mother Wood”. The Queen wears a watch at her waist and two miniature portraits hanging from cords from her...
From: Recent Antiquarian Acquisitions on 15 Oct 2018

“This afternoon General Gage arriv’d from New York”

The Boston Whigs’ dispatch for 15 Oct 1768 reported that the British army’s hunt for deserters had achieved results:A deserter from the 14th Regiment was brought in the last evening by one of the decoy parties, sent into the country, also...
From: Boston 1775 on 15 Oct 2018

“A general disposition to desert from the regiments here”

When the Boston Whigs wrote their “Journal of Occurrences” dispatches for newspapers in other American ports, their main theme was how badly the presence of the British troops was damaging the fabric of Boston society.But an important secondary...
From: Boston 1775 on 12 Oct 2018

La cartographie des routes impériales françaises: le cas du fleuve Saint-Laurent au XVIIIe siècle

Çà et là, l’historiographie a rappelé le rôle singulier de la cartographie pratiquée dans un contexte colonial : offrir des connaissances géographiques aux dirigeants qui souhaitent asseoir leur...
From: Borealia on 3 Oct 2018

“All the Troops Landed under cover of the Cannon”

On the morning on 1 Oct 1768, 250 years ago today, Sheriff Stephen Greenleaf and a deputy started “pressing carts, &c. for the use of the troops.” Boston Whigs indignantly reported that detail to sympathetic newspaper readers in other...
From: Boston 1775 on 1 Oct 2018

Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.