The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "legal history"

Showing 1 - 20 of 34

Your search for posts with tags containing legal history found 34 posts

Success/Failure? Louis Riel and the History of Policing Canada

Max Hamon The toppling of the statue of John A. Macdonald during a protest against policing in downtown Montreal last month was part of a global revolution in public opinion.[1] As Peter Gossage remarked, “this is no longer Macdonald’s Canada.”...
From: Borealia on 21 Sep 2020

Unclaimed Runaways and the Power Struggles of Colonial Haiti: Part I, Legislating Nègres Epaves

By Erica Johnson Edwards This is a part one of a three-part series on nègres épaves in colonial Haiti, tracing the origins of regulations regarding nègres épaves and the roles of these peoples within various colonial struggles...
From: Age of Revolutions on 6 Jul 2020

The Militia and Civic Community in Colonial New Brunswick: Part I, 1786-1816

Service militaire, citoyenneté et culture politique : études des milices au Canada atlantique Nous vous présentons le premier texte d’une série de contributions qui seront publiées au cours des prochaines...
From: Borealia on 18 May 2020

“The Truth and Nothing But the Truth”: Its first use in popular culture

By Stephen Basdeo ‘The truth and nothing but the truth’—it’s a well-known phrase used in courts of law and most of us have probably heard it in some police procedural drama. The principle that one should not lie in a court of law...

The Age of Revolutions and the Impeachment of President Trump: A Post-Mortem

By Malick W. Ghachem The impeachment process just concluded in Washington made remarkable use of the eighteenth century as a source of political and legal authority. Progressive law professors confidently proclaimed an emphatically originalist approach...
From: Age of Revolutions on 13 Feb 2020

Decorous Dispossession: Legally Extinguishing Acadian Landholding Rights

Elizabeth Mancke [Welcome to our summer series on Acadian history! We are very excited to be presenting this special five-week series, cross-posting on Unwritten Histories, Borealia, and  Acadiensis, and in collaboration with the Fredericton Regional...
From: Borealia on 30 Jul 2019

Roundtable Conclusion: Food and Hunger in Vast Early America

Today at The Junto, Rachel Herrmann concludes our food roundtable with some questions for the field of early American food history
From: The Junto on 21 Jun 2019

Review: Edward Rugemer, Slave Law and the Politics of Resistance

Today the Junto reviews Slave Law and the Politics of Resistance in the Early Atlantic World by Yale Associate Professor of African American Studies and History, Edward Rugemer. Stay tuned for a Q&A with the author tomorrow! Historians have long argued...
From: The Junto on 14 Jan 2019

There was no Seigneurial System

Allan Greer From elementary school books to encyclopedia entries to scholarly treatises, no work on New France is complete without a section on the “seigneurial system,” a phenomenon that supposedly shaped the agrarian society of this colony...
From: Borealia on 24 Sep 2018

Is History too Important to be Left to Historians? A review of Canada’s Odyssey: A Country Based on Incomplete Conquests by Peter H. Russell.

Peter H. Russell’s Canada’s Odyssey is a sweeping reconsideration of the foundations of Canada’s constitutional order that has garnered considerable attention and praise. This essay is the third in a three-part series assessing the book’s...
From: Borealia on 21 Sep 2018

History on Appeal: Originalism and Evidence in the Comeau Case

Bradley Miller The Supreme Court declined this month to radically change the way that Canada works. In R v Comeau, lawyers for a New Brunswick man ticketed for bringing too many bottles of beer into the province from Quebec urged the justices to use the...
From: Borealia on 3 May 2018

White Creole Identity on Trial: The Haitian Revolution and Refugees in Louisiana

This post is a part of our “Race and Revolution” series. By Erica Johnson The flight of refugees from the Haitian Revolution intertwined the histories of Louisiana and Saint-Domingue.  The story of one refugee, Pierre Benonime Dormenon...
From: Age of Revolutions on 26 Mar 2018

The Framers Refuted: Originalism and Constitutional Meaning after 1867

This essay is the final installment in a three-part series on Confederation that provides critical historical context for Canada’s sesquicentennial anniversary. The first two parts were posted on the 26th and 28th of June. Bradley Miller In 1882,...
From: Borealia on 30 Jun 2017

Taking Haiti to the Court of Empire: Blanchet v. Boyer, 1826-1827

By Elyssa Gage In 1826, the French lawyer Louis-Antoine Blanchet took the Haitian President, Jean-Pierre Boyer, to court in Le Hâvre, France. Blanchet claimed Boyer owed him a salary for his work on the Haitian legal code. France had only recently...
From: Age of Revolutions on 1 May 2017

Guest Post: Candace Jackson Gray interviews Paul Finkelman

Paul Finkelman is currently the John E. Murray Visiting Professor of Law at the University of Pittsburgh School of Law, where he teaches Constitutional Law and a seminar on the law of slavery.  He received his Ph.D. in U.S. history from the University...
From: The Junto on 27 Dec 2016

Legal Pluralism and the Search for Sovereignty in Post-Conquest Quebec

Aaron Willis The sovereignty of British political institutions and English laws in governing Quebec eroded for a variety of reasons. One source of this erosion was the ability to work outside the strictures of the Common Law granted to officials by the...
From: Borealia on 20 Dec 2016

Diversity and Sovereignty: How the Quebec Act enhanced, not weakened, the British Empire

Aaron Willis The relationship between Britain and supranational structures has consistently raised questions of authority and sovereignty. While the E.U. has provided the most recent theatre for debates over these political concepts, in the eighteenth...
From: Borealia on 15 Aug 2016

Revisiting New England’s Legal Development: Review of Chandler, Law and Sexual Misconduct

Sara Damiano reviews Abby Chandler's book, "Law and Sexual Misconduct in New England, 1650-1750: Steering Toward England."
From: The Junto on 31 Mar 2016

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Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.