The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "legend"

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Your search for posts with tags containing legend found 43 posts

Did George Washington Swear at Charles Lee During the Battle of Monmouth?

The scene is one of the most famous in the annals of the American Revolutionary War. The commander-in-chief of the Continental Army, Gen. George... The post Did George Washington Swear at Charles Lee During the Battle of Monmouth? appeared first on Journal...

Jemima Howe: Two Competing Captivity Narratives

Jemima Howe (1724–1805), a pioneer woman of the early Vermont frontier wilderness, survived a 1755 abduction along with her seven children ranging from six... The post Jemima Howe: Two Competing Captivity Narratives appeared first on Journal of the...

A Reassessment of the Martyrdom of Regulator James Few

Many early histories of the War of Regulation, which culminated in the May 16, 1771 Battle of Alamance, paint a picture of a Regulator... The post A Reassessment of the Martyrdom of Regulator James Few appeared first on Journal of the American Revolution.

Contributor Question: Remembered for the Wrong Reason?

We asked our contributors: Which personality of the American Revolution or the founding era (other than Benedict Arnold) is remembered for the wrong reasons,... The post Contributor Question: Remembered for the Wrong Reason? appeared first on Journal...

Review: George Washington’s Long Island Spy Ring

George Washington’s Long Island Spy Ring:  A History and Tour Guide by Bill Bleyer  (Charleston, SC:  The History Press, 2021) Whoever gets their hands... The post Review: George Washington’s Long Island Spy Ring appeared first on Journal of the...

The Tempest (Contemporary Legend Theatre)

Tsui Hark’s spectacular, operatic Tempest, co-directed with Wu Hsing-kuo (who also plays Prospero), is a mesmerising take on Shakespeare’s play. Available on the MIT Global Shakespeares site, and made available in its 2004 incarnation to delegates...
From: The Bardathon on 27 Jul 2021

Review: Past and Prologue: Politics and Memory in the American Revolution

Past and Prologue: Politics and Memory in the American Revolution by Michael D. Hattem (New Haven & London: Yale University Press, 2021) In his new... The post Review: Past and Prologue: Politics and Memory in the American Revolution appeared...

Who Said, “Don’t Fire Till You See the Whites of Their Eyes”?

“Don’t fire till you see the whites of their eyes!” is one of the most famous quotations to come out of the Revolutionary War. According... The post Who Said, “Don’t Fire Till You See the Whites of Their Eyes”?...

The Fighting Parson’s Farewell Sermon

The history of the American Revolution is rife with heroic tales and amazing myths of patriotic American heroes that offer inspiring and entertaining stories.... The post The Fighting Parson’s Farewell Sermon appeared first on Journal of the American...

“Mad Anthony”: The Reality Behind the Nickname

It is often a tradition among soldiers and sailors to give monikers to their commanders. American military history resounds with names like Gen.Thomas “Stonewall”... The post “Mad Anthony”: The Reality Behind the Nickname appeared...

This Week on Dispatches: William H. J. Manthorpe, Jr. on the Cape Henlopen Lighthouse and Historical Accuracy

On this week’s Dispatches host Brady Crytzer interviews William Manthorpe, a former naval intelligence officer, government senior executive, and professor who specializes on the naval... The post This Week on Dispatches: William H. J. Manthorpe,...

Betty Zane and the Siege of Fort Henry, September 178

In 1774, as tensions between colonials and Native Americans living along the upper Ohio River grew, settlers either fled east of the mountains or... The post Betty Zane and the Siege of Fort Henry, September 1782 appeared first on Journal of the American...

The Lewes Lighthouse Legend Re-examined and Re-interpreted

Those who write “local history” without documenting or citing their sources may as well be writing historical fiction. There may be some truth in... The post The Lewes Lighthouse Legend Re-examined and Re-interpreted appeared first on Journal...

Thomas Jefferson: Life, Liberty, and French Fries

Thomas Jefferson and Julia Child. Not two people you’d expect to be linked in history. But yet, indeed they are—as two gourmets who loved... The post Thomas Jefferson: Life, Liberty, and French Fries appeared first on Journal of the American...

A General’s Funeral: The Burial of Enoch Poor Revisted

In the May 30, 2016 issue of this Journal, Todd W. Braisted introduced us to General Enoch Poor of New Hampshire, his death, and... The post A General’s Funeral: The Burial of Enoch Poor Revisted appeared first on Journal of the American Revolution.

The Tea that Survived the Boston Tea Party

The Boston Tea Party famously saw the destruction of the almost 300 chests worth of tea, tossed into the harbor by “Indians” on December 16,... The post The Tea that Survived the Boston Tea Party appeared first on Journal of the American...

The Ceasg, the Saltire and the Thistle – More Scottish Legends

In previous blog posts, we have featured a variety of creatures from Scottish folklore, as well as a couple of legends, such as the tale of King Robert the Bruce and the spider. Today’s post is about another mythological creature, along with the...
From: Culloden Battlefield on 18 Jun 2019

If Only We Had a Primary Source: Stories of the American Revolution

There are many myths associated with the American Revolution, and at JAR we do our best to set the record straight on as many... The post If Only We Had a Primary Source: Stories of the American Revolution appeared first on Journal of the American Revolution.

Henry Knox’s “Noble Train of Artillery:” No Ox for Kno

The best-known scene of Col. Henry Knox’s train of artillery in the winter of 1775-1776 is Tom Lovell’s painting The Noble Train of Artillery.... The post Henry Knox’s “Noble Train of Artillery:” No Ox for Knox appeared first...

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Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.