The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "letters"

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Your search for posts with tags containing letters found 212 posts

“Be A King George”

“Be a King George.” Four simple, but oft repeated words drilled into the Prince of Wales from childhood by his mother, Augusta of Saxe-Gotha.... The post “Be A King George” appeared first on Journal of the American Revolution.

James Bruce’s Report on the Situation of West Florida and Havana, 178

The British loss of West Florida in 1781 ushered in a new era for the region, an era dominated by Spanish rule. For some,... The post James Bruce’s Report on the Situation of West Florida and Havana, 1782 appeared first on Journal of the American...

Mrs. Crowninshield goes to Washington

A colorful, albeit a bit light, source for women’s history is the collection of letters written home by Mary Boardman Crowninshield (1778-1840), the wife of Benjamin Crowninshield, a congressman and Secretary of the Navy under Presidents...
From: streets of salem on 27 Mar 2019

Brothers Mourn the Death of Captain Thomas Moultrie

Thomas Moultrie was one of five sons of a successful South Carolina planter. He served in the Continental Army during the Revolutionary War as... The post Brothers Mourn the Death of Captain Thomas Moultrie appeared first on Journal of the American Revolution.

Catharine Macaulay, England’s First Female Whig Historian, 1773–1774

By the end of 1772, Catharine Macaulay had completed and published the first five volumes of her History of England from the Accession of... The post Catharine Macaulay, England’s First Female Whig Historian, 1773–1774 appeared first on Journal...

Dear Friends

The library of the University of Leiden (1610)Christophe Plantin worked here from 1583 to 1585.One day in July of 1601, in Florence, early in the morning, we imagine two men shaking hands, embracing and saying goodbye. Both knew it...
From: Conciatore on 28 Jan 2019

The Decision that Lost Britain the War: An Enigma Now Resolved

In this article I address the absurdity of Cornwallis’s decision to march from Wilmington, North Carolina, to Virginia and the light thrown on it... The post The Decision that Lost Britain the War: An Enigma Now Resolved appeared first on Journal...

ASPHS Prizes, 2018: Deardorff & Montcher

I am getting to this belatedly, but: congratulations to Max Deardorff and Fabien Montcher! Deardorff won the Best Early Career Article Prize for “The Ties That Bind: Intermarriage between Moriscos and Old Christians in Early Modern Spain, 1526-1614″...
From: EM Spanish History Notes on 7 Dec 2018

Henry Laurens in England, 1771–177

On October 9, 1771, a ship arrived at the southwestern tip of England. The Earl of Halifax had spent twenty nine days crossing the Atlantic... The post Henry Laurens in England, 1771–1772 appeared first on Journal of the American Revolution.

Stephen Moylan: More than a War Hero

Serving on George Washington’s staff were many talented young men, including some who became famous later. Alexander Hamilton served on the staff ably for... The post Stephen Moylan: More than a War Hero appeared first on Journal of the American...

Appraising Affect in the Transatlantic Correspondence of Richard Popham and John Large

Michael Borsk When the Irish merchant Richard Popham found that his fortunes in New York had turned sour during the fall of 1826, he penned a letter to his acquaintance living in Upper Canada, John Large. “My mind is in a dreadful state of agitation,”...
From: Borealia on 19 Nov 2018

John Row and Jenny Innes

John Row was a British officer in the 9th Regiment of Foot, and he was in love with Jane Innes. For six years their... The post John Row and Jenny Innes appeared first on Journal of the American Revolution.

Digitizing Enlightenment III

The Voltaire Foundation, in collaboration with the Cultures of Knowledge project, the Maison Française d’Oxford, the Oxford Centre for European History and the Centre for Early Modern Studies, was pleased to host the third instalment of the...
From: Voltaire Foundation on 25 Sep 2018

A Loyalist’s Response to the Franco-American Alliance: Charles Inglis’s “Papinian” Essays

At nine o’clock on the morning of May 6, 1778, Continental soldiers at Valley Forge emerged from their huts to hear their regimental chaplains... The post A Loyalist’s Response to the Franco-American Alliance: Charles Inglis’s “Papinian”...

Unlocking the Mystery of Ten Revolutionary Generals’ Signatures

Documents that contain the original signatures of more than one Continental Army general are rare.  During the eight years of the Revolutionary War, generals... The post Unlocking the Mystery of Ten Revolutionary Generals’ Signatures appeared...

Voltaire on death

The following post is reblogged from Oxford University Press. The author, Alyssa Russell, is a marketing manager at OUP on the Global Online Products and Academic/Trade teams. Voltaire, the French Enlightenment writer, historian, and philosopher,...
From: Voltaire Foundation on 7 Aug 2018

Letters on 17th and 18th Century Welsh life to be digitised.

Three thousand rare letters written in the 17th and 18th centuries in Wales are to be digitised for people to read for generations to come.https://www.bbc.com/news/uk-wales-north-west-wales-44779127http://emlo.bodleian.ox.ac.uk/home
From: A Woodsrunner's Diary on 11 Jul 2018

The Early Years: John Adams Lists Abigail’s Faults and Abigail Replies!

As a young country lawyer, John Adams thought he seemed to lack focus. “Ballast is what I want, I totter, with every Breeze. My... The post The Early Years: John Adams Lists Abigail’s Faults and Abigail Replies! appeared first on Journal of...

Mary Robie and the Didactic Qualities of Reading Fiction

Mary Robie, a Massachusetts refugee living in revolutionary Nova Scotia, did not mince words when she criticized her friends for simply “passing thro life”... The post Mary Robie and the Didactic Qualities of Reading Fiction appeared first...

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Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.