The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "literature"

Showing 1 - 20 of 680

Your search for posts with tags containing literature found 680 posts

Breaking Down the Barriers: Love and Walls

By Jodi McAlister, Deakin University Image: Unknown, Guillaume de Lorris, and Jean de Meun (French, about 1240/1260 – 1305), Roman de la Rose, about 1405. Courtesy of The J. Paul Getty Museum, Los Angeles.  In Guillaume de Lorris and Jean de...
From: Histories of Emotion on 14 Feb 2018

Spirits, Spectres & Souls: Ghosts in the Seventeenth Century – A Guest Post by Katherine Clements

In writing The Coffin Path, a ghost story set on the Yorkshire Moors sometime after the English Civil War, I read accounts of as many 17th-century hauntings as I could find. The most striking thing I noticed is how the elements of a good ghost story have...
From: The Seventeenth Century Lady on 7 Feb 2018

Review: Folk Songs in Nineteenth-Century Britain and America

David Atkinson & Steve Roud (eds.) Street Ballads in Nineteenth-Century Britain, Ireland, and North America: The Interface between Print and Oral Traditions (Aldershot: Ashgate, 2014), i-xi, 290pp. £70 (hb) ISBN 978-1-4724-2741-0. The study...

Review: White King: Charles I – Traitor, Murderer, Martyr by Leanda de Lisle

On New Year’s Day 1640, Charles I was in the Banqueting House participating in what would be the last court masque of his reign. Charles himself performed as King Philogenes, the lover of his people, who rescues his kingdom from a Fury named Discord....
From: Mathew Lyons on 30 Jan 2018

ESTC-matching project expands to other Northwestern libraries

Generous funding from Northwestern University Libraries has guaranteed the expansion of “Renaissance Books, Midwestern Libraries,” an initiative I began in 2014 with a Mellon-based seed grant. This undergraduate-powered project aims to report...
From: Vade Mecum on 29 Jan 2018

Curtain Lectures

It was Burns Night at Hamilton Hall last night, and my husband and I were charged with giving the Toast to the Lassies and Reply. After a week steeped in the Ploughman Poet, both of us were a bit uncomfortable with the very bawdy Burns in this year of...
From: streets of salem on 28 Jan 2018

Reading Robin Hood in World War Two (1939–45): Data from Mass Observation

Before the twentieth century, Robin Hood was a literary figure: he is the main protagonist in a number of important literary works such as A Gest of Robyn Hode (c. 1450); Anthony Munday’s The Downfall of Robert, Earle of Huntington and The Death...

1668 - Journal of Connecticut farmer Thomas Minor (1608-1690) mentioning his wife Grace Palmer

A Year in the Life of Thomas Minor, Connecticut Farmer, 1668.Thomas Minor (1608-1690) was born in England & sailed to New England in 1630.  Thomas Minor is considered one of the 4 founders of the Town of Stonington.  In 1653, he bought the...
From: 17th-century American Women on 20 Jan 2018

Hawthorne Hub

Considerations of both donor intent and the importance of place were brushed off pretty quickly by the leadership of the Peabody Essex Museum during the Q&A part of the public forum on the relocation of the Phillips Library last week, in contradiction...
From: streets of salem on 18 Jan 2018

1616-1650s New England area Native Americans dying en masse

Writing in 1634 from Boston, less than 4 years after the city had been founded, John Winthrop (1588-1649), the 1st governor of the Massachusetts Bay Colony, & the chief figure among the Puritan founders of New England, described a population of 4,000...
From: 17th-century American Women on 8 Jan 2018

Goldilocks and the Three Bears: A Tale of Vagrancy and Imprisonment, by Robert Southey (1774-1843)

One of the writers that I have encountered frequently in my research upon both Robin Hood and Wat Tyler is the Romantic author and Poet Laureate, Robert Southey (1774–1843).[i] Southey’s contribution to popular culture has, in my opinion,...

Criminality and Animal Cruelty in 18th-Century England

I am currently in the final stages of editing a book chapter I have written for Prof. Alexander Kaufman’s and Penny Vlagopoulos’s forthcoming work entitled Food and Feasting in Post-1700 Outlaw Narratives (2018). My own contribution focuses...

Visions of “Piers Plowman” in the 18th Century

The best thing about having a Robin Hood theme for this blog is that it allows me to legitimately write about both crime and medievalism (medievalism, as opposed to medieval studies, examines how the medieval period has been represented by authors, artists,...

‘Writing with Conceited Assurance’: A ‘Lost’ Brontë Fragment

By Grace Moore, The University of Melbourne I’ve never been great at manuscript work. An early-career incident with Charles Dickens’ Hard Times manuscript at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London left me convinced that I would never do...
From: Histories of Emotion on 7 Dec 2017

Phyllis Wheatley and the Abolitionist Alternative

By Spencer Jackson, The University of Queensland Near the end of his wonderful new history of the Russian Revolution, October,[1] China Miéville quotes Bruno Schulz’s 1937 reflections on ‘events that have no place of their own in time’....
From: Histories of Emotion on 30 Nov 2017

Teaching English composition with early modern-style “commonplace books”

This fall, I have been trying out a number of strategies to integrate writing exercises, literary readings, and Special Collections visits in my undergraduate pedagogy. These experiments – that’s the word I prefer to use – allow the...
From: Vade Mecum on 20 Nov 2017

A distant look at EEBO-TCP’s “Controversial Literature”

Iona writes: To explore the contents of EEBO-TCP in a distant fashion (and give context to Linguistic DNA data), I have continued to experiment with the Text Creation Partnership’s metadata. Some of this work has been documented in conference papers
From: Linguistic DNA on 17 Nov 2017

Review: Summer’s Last Will and Testament by Thomas Nashe

  Saturday 30 September saw a unique staging of Thomas Nashe’s only extant whole-authored play, Summer’s Last Will and Testament, in the Great Hall of the Bishop’s Palace in Croydon, where it was first performed in the early autumn...
From: Mathew Lyons on 10 Nov 2017

Page 1 of 34123456Last »

Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.