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Search Results for "literature"

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Your search for posts with tags containing literature found 757 posts

A Treasury of Early Irish Literature – BL Manuscript Egerton 178

In this article, our editor Christina Cleary takes a look at BL MS Egerton 1782, a 16th century Irish manuscript that preserves Early Irish tales that have not otherwise survived the centuries… The vellum manuscript known as Egerton 1782, housed...
From: CERAE Impressions: A Blog on 11 Aug 2019

CFP Leeds IMC 2020 Panel: ‘Minority and Marginalised Experiences’

Call for Papers ‘Minority and Marginalised Experiences’ International Medieval Congress 2020, Leeds Ceræ: An Australasian Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies invites abstracts for papers on the theme of ‘Minority and Marginalised...
From: CERAE Impressions: A Blog on 10 Aug 2019

History Today review: Nicholas Hilliard: Life of an Artist by Elizabeth Goldring

It is July 1571, and Elizabeth I is sitting for a portrait in “the open ally of a goodly garden”, almost certainly at Hampton Court. The portrait is “in little” – what we would now call a watercolour miniature, although the...
From: Mathew Lyons on 6 Aug 2019

Renaissance Studies review: Thomas Churchyard: Pen, Sword, Ego by Matthew Woodcock

If, as every self-help book will tell you, persistence really were the key to success, Thomas Churchyard would surely have been the most successful writer of the sixteenth century. Reader, he was not – but it was not for want of trying. One measure...
From: Mathew Lyons on 6 Aug 2019

The longevity of Mary Aubry who was executed by burning in 1688

Sometimes during my research, which currently involves collecting and collating information about the treatment of a corpse after death, I come across the story of an individual who has sparked something within the minds of his or her contemporaries and...
From: We-hang-out-a-lot-in-cemeteries on 30 Jul 2019

La Rochelle and the Roman de Melusine

In this article, our deputy reviews editor Kirsty Bolton takes a look at the medieval port town of La Rochelle, its legendary founder, and its fraught political history… In June, I spent a few days in La Rochelle, a medieval port town...
From: CERAE Impressions: A Blog on 28 Jul 2019

Robert Southey’s “Wedding of Robin Hood and Maid Marian”

By Stephen Basdeo Dr Mark Truesdale and I are currently transcribing Robert Southey’s ‘Harold; or, The Castle of Morford’ (Bodleian MS Eng. Misc. e. 21), which was originally written in the summer of 1791. Robin Hood and Maid Marian,...

“If they must have a British Worthy, they would have Robin Hood”

By Stephen Basdeo This post originally appeared on the IARHS website Amongst the great writers of eighteenth-century literature, the names of two men stand out: Sir Richard Steele (1672-1729) and Joseph Addison (1672-1719). These two quintessentially...

John Winstanley’s Robin Hood Poems

By Stephen Basdeo This article originally appeared on the IARHS Website) Rosemary Mitchell argues that during the eighteenth century, artists and writers when representing the medieval period did not strive for historical authenticity but instead sought...

Anon. ‘Robin Hood’ (1828)

The following poem, written anonymously and titled simply as ‘Robin Hood’, appeared in The Oriental Observer and Literary Chronicle in 1828. The newspaper, printed in Calcutta during the rule of the East India Company, went through a number...

Jack Harkaway: The Victorian Harry Potter

By Stephen Basdeo The Victorians in many ways were just like us: they enjoyed a good scandal whenever it was reported in the press, they liked both trashy and high-brow entertainment, and like today, they had their popular heroes adored by both adults...

A series of prints taken from the New Testament

Intended to accompany Sarah Trimmer’s ‘A description of a set of prints taken from the New Testament’. Author: Trimmer, Sarah, 1741-1810. Title: A series of prints taken from the New Testament, designed as ornaments for those apartments...
From: Recent Antiquarian Acquisitions on 20 Jun 2019

When They See Us: a four part demonstration of what the US criminal (it is criminal) injustice system is

After long grueling hours of separate interrogation, the boys are put together & meet for the first time Friends and readers, Ava DuVernay has made another movie you must not miss — her others are Selma and 13th. Many people will know about...
From: Ellen And Jim Have A Blog, Two on 8 Jun 2019

Brexit, Corbyn, Anything but History: The Way People Talk About Poldark

“I fought for our liberty. For our hopes. For our dreams. And I’ll keep on fighting. Whatever the cost.” These words were first broadcast in 2016. They were spoken by Ross Poldark, shot in extreme close up, interspersed with images of...

A Satire on The Cameronian Tooth #History #Literature #Scotland

The following poem is a satire of the Cameronians, which was probably composed by Alexander Pennecuik shortly before his death in 1730. He was the nephew of Dr. Alexander Pennecuik who wrote about the Gypsies’ Field of Blood at Romanno. It vividly...
From: Jardine's Book of Martyrs on 2 Jun 2019

Andrew Davies’s Les Miserables

Lily Collins as Fantine, holding Mailow Defoy as the child Cosette (Episode 2) Dominic West as the elusive mayor (Episode 2) Andrew Davies produces video masterpieces as regularly as other people simply go out to a movie, and in the last few years or...
From: Ellen And Jim Have A Blog, Two on 26 May 2019

Reading Sallust in Medieval Political and Intellectual Culture

How was the classical historian Sallust read in the twelfth and thirteenth centuries, and what does this reveal about medieval moral thought? These are the questions Philippa Byrne asks in her new article (now live on the Cerae website). Philippa introduces...
From: CERAE Impressions: A Blog on 23 May 2019

Giovanni Boccaccio, The Novels and Tales of the Renowned John Boccacio (1684)

Elizabeth Hawksmoor signed this late seventeenth-century edition of Boccaccio’s works. Though it is difficult to ascertain the precise date of the hand, it is worth noting that the architect Nicholas Hawksmoor had a daughter named Elizabeth. She...

The Female Vagrant

By Stephen Basdeo English authorities always seems to have had a harsh attitude towards its destitute and homeless people, or vagrants. At the height of the Black Death in medieval England, when labour was becoming scarce and many people, understandably,...

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Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.