The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "magazines"

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Your search for posts with tags containing magazines found 24 posts

The Working Man’s Robin Hood: The Writings of Allan Cunningham (1784–1842)

By Stephen Basdeo In 1832, the publisher Charles Knight had a bright idea: every Saturday he would publish a new magazine which whose aim was to educate working-class readers about their world. It would not contain news, and would therefore be exempt...

Happy Birthday, Benjamin Franklin!

Today is an important day for specialists in early American print culture, for Benjamin Franklin was born on January 17, 1706 (January 6, 1705, Old Style), in Boston. Among his many other accomplishments, Franklin is known as the “Father of American...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 17 Jan 2020

December 1

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago this weel? “LONDON MAGAZINE.” Nicholas Langford, “Bookseller, on the Bay,” inserted an advertisement for the London Magazine in the December 7, 1769, edition of...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 10 Dec 2019

Shelter Signalling

I love twentieth-century magazine art, especially early twentieth-century cover illustrations, for various reasons: the accessible aesthetics, the creativity and artistry, the cultural representation. Then as now, magazine publishers and editors wanted...
From: streets of salem on 21 Oct 2019

July 8

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today? Providence Gazette (July 8, 1769). “Subscriptions for the American Magazine, published in Philadelphia.” On behalf of Lewis Nicola, the editor of the American Magazine,...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 8 Jul 2019

May 25

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today? Massachusetts Gazette [Draper] (May 25, 1769).“Such pieces as may serve to illustrate their civil history will be gratefully received.” A week after a brief subscription...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 25 May 2019

May 18

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today? New-York Journal (May 18, 1769). “SUBSCRIPTIONS for the American General Magazine, or General Repository.” By the late 1760s, American booksellers had long imported...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 18 May 2019

Happy Birthday, Benjamin Franklin!

Today is an important day for specialists in early American print culture, for Benjamin Franklin was born on January 17, 1706 (January 6, 1705, Old Style), in Boston. Among his many other accomplishments, Franklin is known as the “Father of American...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 17 Jan 2019

Pilgrim Life

Life magazine was a different sort of periodical in its first incarnation, from 1883 to 1936, than after, when photographs characterized its style and substance. The earlier Life was all about illustration, and all the famous graphic artists...
From: streets of salem on 21 Nov 2018

March On

The first of March: a notable historical day from my own geographical perspective, as it marks the anniversaries of both the incorporation of the first English “city” in North America, my hometown of York, Maine (in 1642), and the commencement...
From: streets of salem on 1 Mar 2018

Séminaire d’IMAGO (Association de recherche en cultures visuelles) : « REGARDS » (Paris, 7 février 2018)

Deuxième séance du séminaire de recherche 2018 d’IMAGO, association de recherche en cultures visuelles, XIX-XXIème siècles Mercredi 7 février de 18h à 20h en salle CIRHAC (Galerie Colbert –...
From: Le blog de l'APAHAU on 1 Feb 2018

Happy Birthday, Benjamin Franklin!

Today is an important day for specialists in early American print culture, for Benjamin Franklin was born on January 17, 1706 (January 6, 1705, Old Style), in Boston.  Among his many other accomplishments, Franklin is known as the “Father of...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 17 Jan 2018

The Lost Bungalows of Great Misery Island

Out on Salem Sound the other day, sailing in a beautiful boat, I looked over at one of the several islands that mark the entrance to Salem Harbor and tried to imagine what once was. Off Great Misery Island there is a calm maritime meeting place referred...
From: streets of salem on 27 Jun 2017

Happy Birthday, Benjamin Franklin!

Today is an important day for specialists in early American print culture, for Benjamin Franklin was born on January 17, 1706, in Boston.  Among his many other accomplishments, Franklin is known as the “Father of American Advertising.”...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 17 Jan 2017

G. W. M. Reynolds’on Robin Hood

Modern period dramas on television often depict the Victorian era as a time when, although there were problems, people never criticised the monarchy or the established order. Yet nothing could be further from the truth, to the extent that Parliament felt...

An Evening of Poetry at the American Antiquarian Society: Review of Citizen Poets of Boston

The American Antiquarian Society sponsors a robust series of Public Programs each fall and spring. I was especially interested in the most recent entry, last week’s “The Citizen Poets of Boston: A Collection of Forgotten Poems” by Paul...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 13 May 2016

Jennie Batchelor on The Lady’s Magazine tomorrow

Filed under: Events, Speakers Tagged: archives, book history, eighteenth century, gender, magazines, periodicals, print culture, Romanticism
From: CRECS// on 30 Nov 2015

Visiting Speaker, 1 Dec 2015: Jennie Batchelor on The Lady’s Magazine

Jennie Batchelor (University of Kent) will be presenting her paper, ‘“The world is a large volume”: The Lady’s Magazine and Romantic Print Culture’, at 5.30pm on Tuesday, 1 December 2015. The talk will...
From: CRECS// on 26 Nov 2015

“Scary Sexual Devices” in PENTHOUSE!

I’m excited to announce that my article on “Scary Sexual Devices from the Past” is featured in PENTHOUSE this month, no doubt killing the mood of readers everywhere! It’s a three-page spread which has been brilliantly illustrated...
From: The Chirurgeon's Apprentice on 19 Sep 2015

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Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.