The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "magic"

Showing 1 - 20 of 133

Your search for posts with tags containing magic found 133 posts

The Magiconomy of Early Modern England

New blogpost written for the Forms of Labour Project examining evidence from county quarter sessions court depositions of magic as a service industry. Featuring magical work activities, divination down-payments, and a wizard named Blind Burnie. via...
From: Ludicrus Histories on 5 Nov 2020

The Magiconomy of Early Modern England

On the night of 8 April 1693, a burglar broke into Thomas Masterman’s house in Stokesley, making off with the hefty sum of £2 10s. To identify the thief and reclaim his money, Masterman trekked south through the north Yorkshire moors to Byland...
From: Forms of Labour on 4 Nov 2020

The Magic of Socotran Aloe

By Shireen Hamza “The people of this island are without faith — and they are strong magicians. They originate from Greece.” What? I had been flipping through Ikhtiyārāt-i Badī‘ī, a Persian pharmaceutical manuscript...
From: The Recipes Project on 29 Oct 2020

Powerful Bundles: The Materiality of Protection Amulets in Early Modern Switzerland

By Eveline Szarka If you shop around for a protection amulet today, you will most likely stumble upon ornamental jewellery. More often than not these pieces are round in shape, and pieces featuring Kabbalistic or runic symbols are especially popular....
From: The Recipes Project on 24 Sep 2020

Touring theatre: Much Ado About Nothing by Rough Magic

From the Rough Magic website. This month, one of Ireland’s leading theatre companies, Rough Magic will embark on a national tour of Much Ado About Nothing by William Shakespeare. Set on the deck of a deluxe mobile home this festive production...
From: Shakespeare in Ireland on 5 Nov 2019

Enlightenment-era Ghosts and the History of Technology

A detail of one of Etienne Gaspard Robertson's "phantasmagoria."Ghosts were in the air in eighteenth-century London. Few knew this better than James Boswell, the friend and biographer of Samuel Johnson. On a gloomy Saturday in March of 1762, feeling “cold...
From: Res Obscura on 30 Oct 2019

Witches at Night: Creative Responses to Early Modern Witch Trials

In the 1613 pamphlet Witches Apprehended, Examined and Executed, a servant gossips about a local woman he believes to be a witch. As he speaks, he is struck by a […]
From: Inner Lives on 16 Sep 2019

Which Ingredients are Witch Ingredients?”

By Dana Schumacher-Schmidt, Siena Heights University Over the last ten years or so teaching undergraduate Shakespeare courses, I’ve developed an exercise to enhance students’ exploration of Macbeth. I’ve found this activity to be effective...
From: The Recipes Project on 3 Sep 2019

Theatre: “Much Ado About Nothing” at the Kilkenny Arts Festival

[From the Kilkenny Arts Festival website] On the deck of a deluxe mobile home a group of friends gather for a week-long party full of cocktail-infused debauchery, bad dancing and questionable gender politics. As the celebrations continue, two couples...
From: Shakespeare in Ireland on 29 Jul 2019

Workshop on Medieval Magic: Future Directions

Wednesday 26 June 2019 IAS Ground, South Wing, UCL Convened by Sophie Page (UCL) and Catherine Rider (Exeter) The recently published The Routledge History of Medieval Magic (January 2019) brought […]
From: Inner Lives on 28 May 2019

Nordic Noir: Creating Denmark’s First Museum of Witchcraft

In December 2018 a small group from the Museum of Southwest Jutland in Denmark, consisting of Lulu Anne Hansen (Head of Historical Research), Mette Slyngborg (Curator), Louise Lindgaard (Research Assistant), […]
From: Inner Lives on 14 May 2019

The Witch of Loddon and Changing Perceptions of Witchcraft in Victorian England

There are many stories of witchcraft in rural England from the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, but it is rare to find accounts of self-professed witches who actually attempted to make […]
From: Inner Lives on 17 Apr 2019

Book Review: The Familiars by Stacey Halls

The 1612 Pendle witch trials in Lancashire began when the peddler, John Law, refused to sell his pins to Alizon Device. Following the encounter, Law was stricken with a sickness […]
From: Inner Lives on 9 Apr 2019

Conference Report: Living in a Magical World: Inner Lives, 1300–19

Historians have learned to appreciate the supernatural as integral to past lives. No longer are magical beliefs and practices anachronistically condescended to as ‘superstitions’, entertained only by a credulous minority […]
From: Inner Lives on 2 Apr 2019

The Routledge History of Medieval Magic: Reflections on a Big Editing Project

This post was first published on the blog of the Exeter Centre for Medieval Studies. I’m very pleased to announce that the Routledge History of Medieval Magic, edited by Sophie Page (UCL) […]
From: Inner Lives on 18 Mar 2019

Magical Charms, Love Potions, and Surreal Tricks

A compact fifteenth-century paper book, MS Sloane 1315 (British Library, London), stands as a manuscript witness to many of the works of popular Middle English instruction. The book might be said to be a miscellany or multi-text manuscript that is home...
From: The Recipes Project on 14 Mar 2019

Magical Thoughts: The Making of Spellbound

Our exhibition Spellbound: Magic, Ritual, and Witchcraft at the Ashmolean Museum of Art and Archaeology, led by Sophie Page with art historian Marina Wallace, has disappeared into the ether and […]
From: Inner Lives on 7 Feb 2019

But does it work? Playful magic and the question of a recipe’s purpose

By Melissa Reynolds One of the many pleasures of studying late medieval English “how-to” manuscripts is the wide and often surprising array of knowledge to be found within them. Most contain a good bit of medical information, such...
From: The Recipes Project on 24 Jan 2019

Charmed: into the Spellbound exhibition at the Ashmolean Museum, Oxford

Kristof Smeyers Entering the ‘Spellbound’ exhibition, you are confronted with a ladder leaning against a wall like a menacing question mark. There is no avoiding this ladder. Do you walk under it or do you go round? Even before you are inside...
From: The Recipes Project on 8 Jan 2019

Image Magic: Drawing the History of Sorcery, Ritual, and Witchcraft

In October last year I was sent an email accompanied by a zip folder full of images; these included a witch and her familiars, a woman suffering from convulsions, an […]
From: Inner Lives on 15 Oct 2018

Page 1 of 7123456Last »

Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.