The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "making"

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Your search for posts with tags containing making found 240 posts

Primordial Matter

16th century Mining practices, from Agricola, De Re MetallicaIn the early seventeenth century, Florentine priest Antonio Neri wrote the first printed book devoted to formulating glass from raw materials. His work is called L'Arte Vetraria, which...
From: Conciatore on 17 Jul 2020

Thévenot Continues East

Stained glass windows of the Nasir al-Mulk 'Pink Mosque', Shiraz, IranPhoto by Domiri Mohammad Reza Ganji.(Click to enlarge)Previously, we followed the progress of seventeenth century tourist Jean de Thévenot, noting his comments about glass as...
From: Conciatore on 11 May 2020

Glass, Fire, and Brimstone

The Alchemical Symbol for SulfurBright yellow elemental sulfur or “brimstone” as it was often called, occupied a central place in the cabinets of seventeenth century alchemists. Antonio Neri used it in many of his preparations and specifically...
From: Conciatore on 24 Apr 2020

Crocus Martis

The many different alchemical symbols used to denote crocus martis.In order to understand the seventeenth century glass recipes of Antonio Neri and for that matter, any alchemical recipes, it is first necessary to have a grasp of the chemical...
From: Conciatore on 15 Apr 2020

18th Century Metal Files.

The file and whetstone I carry in my knapsack.In the early 18th century all metal files were fashioned by hand by a file cutter. Blank files were made by the blacksmith & then sold to the file cutter.A 16th century German file cutter (Taylor, 1920,...
From: A Woodsrunner's Diary on 14 Apr 2020

Rise and Fall

"Merry Company," (1623)Gerard van HonthorstThe first decade of the seventeenth century was a golden era for glass in Tuscany. The Venetian techniques brought to the region by Grand Duke Cosimo de' Medici in the 1570s had been assimilated. The pioneering...
From: Conciatore on 23 Mar 2020

Looking for Trouble, Even on the Sabbath

Among the men who brawled at John Gray’s ropewalk on 2 Mar 1770 were a young ropemaker named Samuel Gray (no known relation) and Pvts. William Warren and Mathew Kilroy of the 29th Regiment. The next day, there were more fights in Boston. Some redcoats...
From: Boston 1775 on 4 Mar 2020

Five Ways of Looking at a Brawl

Here are five men’s perspectives on what happened outside John Gray’s ropewalk in central Boston on Friday, 2 Mar 1770, 250 years ago today.Samuel Bostwick, ropemaker:between 10 and 11 o’clock in the forenoon, three soldiers of the 29th...
From: Boston 1775 on 2 Mar 2020

The Sestercentennial of the Boston Massacre

The shooting of Christopher Seider led on to the Boston Massacre, one of the major milestones on the road to the American Revolution. The 250th anniversary of the Massacre will be 5 March 2020, but it’s such a big event that there will be multiple...
From: Boston 1775 on 29 Feb 2020

Indigenous Possum Skin Cloaks.

Possum-skin cloak — Canberra Museum & Galleryhttps://aiatsis.gov.au/exhibitions/possum-skin-cloak
From: A Woodsrunner's Diary on 24 Feb 2020

The Great 1770 Quiz Answers, Part

Here are the answers to the questions remaining from part 1 of the Great 1770 Quiz, along with the background and sources for each answer. III. Match the person to the weapon he reportedly carried at the Boston Massacre.1) catstick2) cordwood stick3)...
From: Boston 1775 on 12 Feb 2020

Art and Science

Jacopo Ligozzi,1518,  fanciful glass vessels,ink and watercolor on paper.Antonio Neri's writing on glassmaking and alchemy was distinguished from that of many contemporary authors in that his work was all deeply rooted in hands-on experience. He...
From: Conciatore on 1 Jan 2020

Fire, Brimstone, and Glass

The Alchemical Symbol for SulfurBright yellow elemental sulfur or “brimstone” as it was often called, occupied a central place in the cabinets of seventeenth century alchemists. Antonio Neri used it in many of his preparations and specifically...
From: Conciatore on 13 Dec 2019

Students learn life as 18th century child. Experimental Archaeology.

Students dressed in 18th century clothing making an apple Pomander Ball.More information here: https://www.victoriaadvocate.com/news/education/students-learn-life-as-th-century-child/article_3f315b26-193b-11ea-9cce-2bc03133f052.html
From: A Woodsrunner's Diary on 10 Dec 2019

Crocus Martis

The many different alchemical symbols used to denote crocus martis.In order to understand the seventeenth century glass recipes of Antonio Neri and for that matter, any alchemical recipes, it is first necessary to have a grasp of the chemical...
From: Conciatore on 4 Dec 2019

Gallera dei Lavori

Giovanni Stradano  (Jan van der Straet) Alchemy Studio, 1571(Inside the Uffizi Galleria dei Lavori)In 1560, Cosimo I, Duke of Tuscany, commissioned Georgio Vassari to begin construction on the Uffizi Palace in Florence. Two wings of the structure...
From: Conciatore on 23 Oct 2019

Thévenot Continues East

Stained glass windows of the Nasir al-Mulk 'Pink Mosque', Shiraz, IranPhoto by Domiri Mohammad Reza Ganji.(Click to enlarge)Previously, we followed the progress of seventeenth century tourist Jean de Thévenot, noting his comments about glass as...
From: Conciatore on 16 Oct 2019

Tapping into Revolutionary Networks

At the Junto blog, Jordan E. Taylor interviewed Framingham State professor Joseph Adelman about his new book, Revolutionary Networks: The Business and Politics of Printing the News, 1763–1789. Many books have studied the political printing of the...
From: Boston 1775 on 6 Sep 2019

Primordial Matter

16th century Mining practices, from Agricola, De Re MetallicaIn the early seventeenth century, Florentine priest Antonio Neri wrote the first printed book devoted to formulating glass from raw materials. His work is called L'Arte Vetraria, which...
From: Conciatore on 6 Sep 2019

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Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.