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Your search for posts with tags containing maps found 205 posts

Massachusetts Route 57

I have taken a lot of road trips this summer: west, south, north. On my way to any place in the first two directions, I’ve tried to explore a territory I call “middle Massachusetts” between the greater Boston area (which I tend to extend to Worcester)...
From: streets of salem on 22 Aug 2022

A representation of the present state of France

“Napoleon, pushing an officer before him through a pillared doorway, looks back to speak to a monk and a sansculotte, shackled together, who drag a car in which is an imperial crown. They hold a large scroll inscribed: ‘Most religious Sovereign –...
From: Recent Antiquarian Acquisitions on 12 Aug 2022

Voornaamste gebouwen vande stadt Romen t’Amsterdam

Views of Rome (including the Vatican City), London, Amsterdam, and Tangier. Printmaker: Ram, Johannes de, 1648-1693, printmaker. Title: Voornaamste gebouwen vande stadt Romen t’Amsterdam / by Iohannes de Ram. Publication: [Amsterdam] : [publisher...
From: Recent Antiquarian Acquisitions on 19 Jul 2022

England

A comic map of Great Britain: an old woman is shown in profile, facing to the left, and seated on the back of a dolphin-like monster. At the top her cap is Scotland; her neck is labeled R. Tees (River Tees) and along her back is “Humber” and “The...
From: Recent Antiquarian Acquisitions on 6 Jul 2022

A Salem Slaver

It’s beautiful here in Salem and I had a very colorful post all lined up for you: gardens, the arts festival, blue trees, doors of many colors, cats, my lady’s slippers, simple pleasures. But no, I had to read a letter from a son in a distant port...
From: streets of salem on 6 Jun 2022

The Eminent Antiquarian

I have been meaning to post on the most eminent of Salem’s antiquarians, Henry FitzGilbert Waters (1833-1913) for a while, but I kept finding more information about him and thought I’d wait until I had the total picture: but clearly he is one of those...
From: streets of salem on 28 Apr 2022

The General magazine of arts and sciences

General magazine of arts and sciences, philosophical, philological, mathematical and mechanical.   Uniform Title: General magazine of arts and sciences (London, England : 1755) Title: The General magazine of arts and sciences. … Published: London,...
From: Recent Antiquarian Acquisitions on 24 Jan 2022

Sidney Perley’s Houses

Sidney Perley (1858-1928) exemplified that exhausting mix of endeavors—historical, genealogical, archaeological, architectural, legal, literary—which in his time was represented by the occupational identity of an “antiquarian.” It was a title...
From: streets of salem on 21 Jan 2022

Review: Surveying in Early America

BOOK REVIEW: Surveying in Early America: The Point of Beginning, An Illustrated History by Dan Patterson and Clinton Terry (Cincinnati, OH: University of Cincinnati Press, 2021)... The post Review: Surveying in Early America appeared first on Journal...

Terrain and Tactics: Detailed Perspectives From William Howe’s War Plan of 1776

The objective of the 1776 British campaign was straightforward: capture New York and crush the American rebellion. The plan was the brainchild of British... The post Terrain and Tactics: Detailed Perspectives From William Howe’s War Plan of 1776 appeared...

What Were the Brooklyn Line of Forts in 1776?

The planned capture of New York City in 1776 by British forces set the stage for what was to become the largest battle of... The post What Were the Brooklyn Line of Forts in 1776? appeared first on Journal of the American Revolution.

Where Dutch seafarers on Belgian merchant vessels came from (1845-1885)

In an earlier post, our colleague Kristof Loockx, postdoctoral researcher at the University of Antwerp, wrote about the Antwerp seamen’s registry–a great source for maritime historical research. In this post, he takes a closer look at the Dutchmen...
From: Maritime Careers on 23 Sep 2021

Phraseology and the “Fourteenth Colony”

The phrase “fourteenth colony” describes a province in British North America that did not revolt alongside the original thirteen colonies. Such a province usually... The post Phraseology and the “Fourteenth Colony” appeared first on Journal of...

Dissected maps and the invention of the jigsaw

Thanks to lockdown, sales of jigsaw puzzles grew nearly 40% in 2020, reaching £100 million for the first time. It’s a far cry from the puzzle’s humble origin in a printmakers shop just off Drury Lane. The concept of children’s publishing was slowly...
From: Mathew Lyons on 17 Jun 2021

Bahne on “Cradle of Liberty,” 5 May

For folks intrigued by Ens. Henry DeBerniere’s map of the Massachusetts countryside in early 1775, I hope you caught the comments from Charles Bahne about it—particularly sites I couldn’t identify. In addition to being a practiced tour...
From: Boston 1775 on 29 Apr 2021

“A view or plan of the battle of Bunker’s hill”

On 10 May 1816, the Wilkesbarre Gleaner newspaper, published by Charles Miner, announced a discovery about the Battle of Bunker Hill, more than forty years earlier. According to a reprint in Niles’s Weekly Register the following month, it said:...
From: Boston 1775 on 27 Apr 2021

The Lost DeBerniere Manuscripts

On 30 June 1775, Ens. Henry DeBerniere was promoted to the rank of lieutenant in the 10th Regiment of Foot. Nine months later, on 17 March 1776, he evacuated Boston with the rest of the British military. That departure was rushed enough that Lt. DeBerniere...
From: Boston 1775 on 26 Apr 2021

Concord “fit for ENCAMPMENTS”

When Capt. William Brown and Ens. Henry DeBerniere first ventured out into the Massachusetts countryside in civilian clothes, from 23 February to 2 March 1775, their focus was Worcester. Gen. Thomas Gage’s spy on the provincial congress’s...
From: Boston 1775 on 24 Apr 2021

Dots on the Ensign’s Map

Yesterday I started to discuss a hand-drawn map from the Library of Congress that Ed Redmond has identified as likely coming from British army spy Ens. Henry DeBeniere weeks before the march to Concord.That map marks several individual homes. Some of...
From: Boston 1775 on 23 Apr 2021

A Tory-Loving Town?

Salem has a bit of a reputation as a “Tory-loving town” due to the sentiments of some of its more conspicuous residents on the eve of the Revolution: prominent judges, merchants and lawyers could not reconcile their local and imperial loyalties...
From: streets of salem on 23 Apr 2021

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