The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "maps"

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Your search for posts with tags containing maps found 202 posts

The Eminent Antiquarian

I have been meaning to post on the most eminent of Salem’s antiquarians, Henry FitzGilbert Waters (1833-1913) for a while, but I kept finding more information about him and thought I’d wait until I had the total picture: but clearly he is one of those...
From: streets of salem on 28 Apr 2022

The General magazine of arts and sciences

General magazine of arts and sciences, philosophical, philological, mathematical and mechanical.   Uniform Title: General magazine of arts and sciences (London, England : 1755) Title: The General magazine of arts and sciences. … Published: London,...
From: Recent Antiquarian Acquisitions on 24 Jan 2022

Sidney Perley’s Houses

Sidney Perley (1858-1928) exemplified that exhausting mix of endeavors—historical, genealogical, archaeological, architectural, legal, literary—which in his time was represented by the occupational identity of an “antiquarian.” It was a title...
From: streets of salem on 21 Jan 2022

Review: Surveying in Early America

BOOK REVIEW: Surveying in Early America: The Point of Beginning, An Illustrated History by Dan Patterson and Clinton Terry (Cincinnati, OH: University of Cincinnati Press, 2021)... The post Review: Surveying in Early America appeared first on Journal...

Terrain and Tactics: Detailed Perspectives From William Howe’s War Plan of 1776

The objective of the 1776 British campaign was straightforward: capture New York and crush the American rebellion. The plan was the brainchild of British... The post Terrain and Tactics: Detailed Perspectives From William Howe’s War Plan of 1776 appeared...

What Were the Brooklyn Line of Forts in 1776?

The planned capture of New York City in 1776 by British forces set the stage for what was to become the largest battle of... The post What Were the Brooklyn Line of Forts in 1776? appeared first on Journal of the American Revolution.

Where Dutch seafarers on Belgian merchant vessels came from (1845-1885)

In an earlier post, our colleague Kristof Loockx, postdoctoral researcher at the University of Antwerp, wrote about the Antwerp seamen’s registry–a great source for maritime historical research. In this post, he takes a closer look at the Dutchmen...
From: Maritime Careers on 23 Sep 2021

Dissected maps and the invention of the jigsaw

Thanks to lockdown, sales of jigsaw puzzles grew nearly 40% in 2020, reaching £100 million for the first time. It’s a far cry from the puzzle’s humble origin in a printmakers shop just off Drury Lane. The concept of children’s publishing was slowly...
From: Mathew Lyons on 17 Jun 2021

Bahne on “Cradle of Liberty,” 5 May

For folks intrigued by Ens. Henry DeBerniere’s map of the Massachusetts countryside in early 1775, I hope you caught the comments from Charles Bahne about it—particularly sites I couldn’t identify. In addition to being a practiced tour...
From: Boston 1775 on 29 Apr 2021

“A view or plan of the battle of Bunker’s hill”

On 10 May 1816, the Wilkesbarre Gleaner newspaper, published by Charles Miner, announced a discovery about the Battle of Bunker Hill, more than forty years earlier. According to a reprint in Niles’s Weekly Register the following month, it said:...
From: Boston 1775 on 27 Apr 2021

The Lost DeBerniere Manuscripts

On 30 June 1775, Ens. Henry DeBerniere was promoted to the rank of lieutenant in the 10th Regiment of Foot. Nine months later, on 17 March 1776, he evacuated Boston with the rest of the British military. That departure was rushed enough that Lt. DeBerniere...
From: Boston 1775 on 26 Apr 2021

Concord “fit for ENCAMPMENTS”

When Capt. William Brown and Ens. Henry DeBerniere first ventured out into the Massachusetts countryside in civilian clothes, from 23 February to 2 March 1775, their focus was Worcester. Gen. Thomas Gage’s spy on the provincial congress’s...
From: Boston 1775 on 24 Apr 2021

Dots on the Ensign’s Map

Yesterday I started to discuss a hand-drawn map from the Library of Congress that Ed Redmond has identified as likely coming from British army spy Ens. Henry DeBeniere weeks before the march to Concord.That map marks several individual homes. Some of...
From: Boston 1775 on 23 Apr 2021

A Tory-Loving Town?

Salem has a bit of a reputation as a “Tory-loving town” due to the sentiments of some of its more conspicuous residents on the eve of the Revolution: prominent judges, merchants and lawyers could not reconcile their local and imperial loyalties...
From: streets of salem on 23 Apr 2021

The Ensign’s Map of a Road to Concord

In 2016, Ed Redmond of the Library of Congress’s Geography and Map Division shared an interesting discovery about an item in that collection.Redmond wrote: Several years ago, I stumbled across an unsigned manuscript map with the supplied title...
From: Boston 1775 on 22 Apr 2021

Online Lectures about Maps, Soldiers, and Constitutions

This month I’ve listed online events to commemorate the 19th of April, and then more of those, and then another along with two events about tavern culture. And yet here are three more online historical events scheduled in the next week. “Mapping...
From: Boston 1775 on 15 Apr 2021

Why Yorktown? Yorktown in Human and Geological Time

Written human history only dates back a few thousand years while geologic time is often measured in tens or hundreds of millions of years.... The post Why Yorktown? Yorktown in Human and Geological Time appeared first on Journal of the American Revolution.

Digital Databases to Stay Home For

Here are four digital resources that caught my attention over the past few months. The British Library has digitized George III’s Topographical Library and put the scans on Flickr, each linked back to its own catalogue for full information. There...
From: Boston 1775 on 20 Dec 2020

Atlas of Boston History Wins Historic New England Book Prize

Historic New England (formerly the Society for the Protection of New England Antiquities) has awarded its 2020 Book Prize to The Atlas of Boston History, edited by Nancy S. Seasholes and written by her and a bevy of contributors, including me. The society...
From: Boston 1775 on 15 Nov 2020

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Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.