The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "maps"

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Your search for posts with tags containing maps found 178 posts

Cabotia and Fredonia

Amanda Murphyao [This is the ninth essay of the Borealia series on Cartography and Empire–on the many ways maps were employed in the contested imperial spaces of early modern North America.] In his 1814 “Map of Cabotia,”...
From: Borealia on 28 Nov 2018

Colonizing St. John Island: A History in Maps

S. Max Edelson This essay examines the Board of Trade’s survey and plan for St. John Island (renamed Prince Edward in 1798). It is part of a larger study of British surveying and colonization in the maritime northeast, which is the focus of chapter...
From: Borealia on 14 Nov 2018

Mapping the End of Empire

Jeffers Lennox [This is the seventh essay of the Borealia series on Cartography and Empire–on the many ways maps were employed in the contested imperial spaces of early modern North America.] If we accept the argument that maps helped...
From: Borealia on 7 Nov 2018

Colonial Canada: Making the Familiar Dis/Comfortingly Strange

Daniel Samson In my introductory colonial Canadian survey course, students sometimes complain that I spend “all” of my time on Nova Scotia. That’s not actually true, but I understand their point. It may be true that I talk about Nova...
From: Borealia on 5 Nov 2018

Absence Makes the Art. Go Ponder.

[This is the sixth essay of the Borealia series on Cartography and Empire–on the many ways maps were employed in the contested imperial spaces of early modern North America.]  Alan MacEachern The following post may not suit a scholarly...
From: Borealia on 31 Oct 2018

Seven Weeks to Venice: History Through Isochronic Maps

Detail of a 1921 map that visualizes its own accuracy: red regions are accurately mapped, orange less so, etc.Historians love maps, but we don't always use them to their full potential. I'm as guilty of this as anyone; for my own book, I'm probably going...
From: Res Obscura on 26 Oct 2018

L’île aux démons: cartographie d’un mirage

[This is the fifith essay of the Borealia series on Cartography and Empire–on the many ways maps were employed in the contested imperial spaces of early modern North America.]  Alban Berson On serait bien en peine de pointer sur une...
From: Borealia on 24 Oct 2018

True Interests: Environmental History and National Ambition (Or, Let’s Squish Canada)

[This is the fourth essay of the Borealia series Cartography and Empire–on the many ways maps were employed in the contested imperial spaces of early modern North America.]  Claire Campbell Borders have been in the news these past...
From: Borealia on 17 Oct 2018

‘Tarontos Lac’: Geographer finds oldest known reference to Toronto on 340-year-old French map

A geographer has found what could be the earliest reference to Toronto on a map dated from 1678. In small lettering in one corner of the map was the name “Lac Tarontos,” written on what is now Lake Simcoe. The term originates from the...

Early-Modern Place Names in Today’s Canada

Lauren Beck The Geographic Names Board of Canada (GNBC) provides scholars with a database of place names that allows users to look up the location of a place name, but that’s about all the information one can glean from this utility. The provinces...
From: Borealia on 10 Oct 2018

La cartographie des routes impériales françaises: le cas du fleuve Saint-Laurent au XVIIIe siècle

Çà et là, l’historiographie a rappelé le rôle singulier de la cartographie pratiquée dans un contexte colonial : offrir des connaissances géographiques aux dirigeants qui souhaitent asseoir leur...
From: Borealia on 3 Oct 2018

Mapping Land Tenure Pluralism in the St. Lawrence River Valley

Julia Lewandoski [This essay kicks off a Borealia series on Cartography and Empire-on the many ways maps were employed in the contested imperial spaces of early modern North America.]  After the 1763 Peace of Paris, British officials embarked...
From: Borealia on 26 Sep 2018

Where the historians are, 2017

“Shaving the yak” is a phrase used to describe the process of programming. It alludes to the fact that you often have to take two, or more, steps backward in order to eventually move one step forward. You want a sweater, so first you need...
From: Skulking in Holes and Corners on 19 Sep 2018

Rocks Village

We have had the longest stretch of horrible humid weather in my memory: it’s been hot too, but it’s the humidity that gets you, of course. The only place I’ve really been comfortable is my car, and so when I drove up to Maine for...
From: streets of salem on 19 Aug 2018

Golden Hill Roundtable: Retracing Mr. Smith’s Steps Through Eighteenth-Century Manhattan

Today, Katy Lasdow uses digital maps to retrace Mr. Smith's steps through eighteenth-century Manhattan in our Golden Hill roundtable.
From: The Junto on 5 Jul 2018

Mapping Durham’s Medieval Sanctuary Seekers

Posted by Krista Kesselring; 2 July 2018. Sanctuary-seeking today typically refers to the efforts of refugees fleeing war or persecution who hope for asylum in a safe place, usually across a national border. In medieval England, people in debt or who...
From: Legal History Miscellany on 2 Jul 2018

“full expectations of seeing better days”

Returning to the United States, here is another woman’s account of a search for a new home. MARY COBURN DEWEES kept a journal of her journey from Philadelphia to Kentucky to share with family and friends. Accompanied by her brother Judge Coburn,...
From: In the Words of Women on 28 Jun 2018

Vision of Britain

VISION OF BRITAIN A vision of Britain from 1801 to now. Including maps, statistical trends and historical descriptions. Of most relevance: Ordnance Survey First Series 1:63360 (170 sheets covering England and Wales, 1805 to 1869); C. Smith New Map of...
From: Naomi Clifford on 23 Jun 2018

Mapping the Battle of Bunker Hill

With the sestercentennial of June 1768 passing by, I have few days to devote to the Battle of Bunker Hill. But here’s Charles E. Frye’s map of that battle, completed in 2011 and available through Wikipedia. It’s unusual in positioning...
From: Boston 1775 on 17 Jun 2018

National Library of Scotland

NATIONAL LIBRARY OF SCOTLAND Zoomable, high-resolution colour maps dating from between 1560 and 1964, primarily related to Scotland but also including England and Great Britain, Ireland, Belgium, and Jamaica. There are also maps made for military purposes...
From: Naomi Clifford on 6 Jun 2018

Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.