The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "marginalia"

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Your search for posts with tags containing marginalia found 67 posts

Making Sense of Recipes for Amulets and Natural Magic, Kabbalistic Style (Marginalia Included)

By Agata Paluch Among Jewish recipe books, both in manuscript and in print, a prominent place take manuals produced by the members of the educated rabbinic elite. For instance, one of the most famous rabbinic authorities and kabbalists of the seventeenth...
From: The Recipes Project on 7 Oct 2021

Digitising the margins: a classification of Voltaire’s scribbles

The most famous squiggly lines relating to eighteenth-century writing are almost certainly to be found in Tristram Shandy. Sterne uses them to illustrate the non-linearity of stories (see about halfway down that page) and digressions from the main narrative,...
From: Voltaire Foundation on 12 Nov 2020

Gillian Pink at the Voltaire Foundation: thirteen years and counting

As we approach the completion of the Œuvres complètes de Voltaire, I sat down with team co-ordinator Gillian Pink to find out more about how joining the editorial team led to becoming a researcher in her own right. Gillian Pink and Birgit...
From: Voltaire Foundation on 27 Feb 2020

Filed under “Amusing Diversion”

Working through a manuscript I came across this folio with a large diagram of the zodiac in the center. A folio from a 14th-c. astrological manuscript, with a large diagram of the signs in the middle. What caught my attention was the drawing in the upper...
From: Darin Hayton on 4 Oct 2019

Milton's Shakespeare: A Digest of Media Coverage

Suggested emendations to the text of ‘Romeo & Juliet’ in the Free Library of Philadelphia’s First Folio. [Reproduced with kind permission of the Free Library of Philadelphia’s Rare Book Department.] ...

With(out) Milton: Dating the Annotations in the Free Library of Philadelphia's First Folio

Detail of manuscript emendation and bracketing in the Free Library of Philadelphia’s copy of Mr William Shakespeares Comedies, Histories, & Tragedies (1623). [Image reproduced with kind permission of the Free Library of Philadelphia.] ...

How to tell a king he writes bad verse

The only portrait Frederick ever personally sat for (by Ziesenis, 1763). In 1750, Voltaire travelled to the court of the Prussian king, Frederick II. There, one of his official duties would be to correct the king’s writings in French, in particular...
From: Voltaire Foundation on 12 Sep 2019

Studying in the book of another’s notes

By Sara Marie Westh I am back, with another question from the Halliwell-Phillipps notebooks for our brilliant readers to ponder, since the last query yielded such a wealth of suggestions. Once again, my thanks to you all for your help as archival...
From: Blogging Shakespeare on 23 Nov 2018

The Voltaire Library Project: using digital humanities to understand Voltaire’s influences

Lena Zlock is a rising senior at Stanford University double-majoring in History and French. She is the principal investigator of the Voltaire Library Project, a digital humanities study of Voltaire’s personal library. She will be working at the...
From: Voltaire Foundation on 24 Jul 2018

June 29

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today? Georgia Gazette (June 29, 1768).“Has just imported for Sale from LONDON, By the CHARMING SALLY, Capt. RAINIER.” To inform residents of Savannah and the rest of the colony...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 29 Jun 2018

Apprivoiser ses livres: Voltaire ‘marginaliste’

Les marginalia sont un phénomène auquel on s’intéresse de plus en plus, comme l’illustre par exemple le répertoire Annotated Books Online. Paradoxalement, à une époque où il est souvent mal...
From: Voltaire Foundation on 26 Apr 2018

MaRSA CALL FOR PAPERS: "In the Margins"

Medieval and Renaissance Student Association California State University, Long Beach Deadline for submissions:  February 6, 2018Contact email:  medren.csulb@gmail.comThe Medieval and Renaissance Student Association (MaRSA) of California...
From: The Renaissance Diary on 19 Apr 2018

Natalia Elaguina décorée

Madame Natalia Elaguina a été décorée de l’ordre des Arts et des Lettres au grade de chevalier le 18 novembre dernier au Consulat général de France à Saint-Pétersbourg. L’équipe...
From: Voltaire Foundation on 1 Dec 2017

A “prity one”: Frances Wolfreston’s copy of Thomas Heywood’s The English Traveller (1633)

The early modern reader Frances Wolfreston (1607-1677) has attracted a considerable amount of attention from scholars in recent decades. “Frances wolfreston her bouk,” she often wrote in her copies of seventeenth-century publications. Intriguingly,...
From: Vade Mecum on 1 Mar 2017

The last scene of all, / That ends

Last weekend, quite literally half a world away, my grandmother died. She had survived a long illness many years ago—had come back stronger. But this was not that. This was her heart. And it happened very quickly.Hours after I hear the news, I walk...

The Ambivalent Alchemist’s Guide to History: Or, Why Gabriel Plattes Matters

“But if you look at the history, modern chemistry only starts coming in to replace alchemy around the same time capitalism really gets going. Strange, eh? What do you make of that?” Webb nodded agreeably. “Maybe capitalism decided it...
From: memorious on 8 Jun 2016

On card catalogues

The yesterday’s post at Folger Library’s Collation brought back some memories of all the card catalogues I have studied back and forth over the past years, starting from the catalogue rooms of the Jagiellonian Library and the Czartoryski Library...
From: Chronologia Universalis on 20 Apr 2016

The Lost Children’s Drawings in a 19th-Century Medical Manuscript.

I’ve always been fascinated by marginalia in manuscripts – the comments written in the margins, the little drawings or doodles that someone absent-mindedly scribbled onto a piece of paper, in all likelihood blissfully unaware that someone...
From: DrAlun on 14 Apr 2016

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This search feature has a number of purposes:

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Caveats and Work in Progress

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The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

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