The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "material culture"

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Your search for posts with tags containing material culture found 265 posts

The Statues of a Scottish Childhood: Emotions and History

By Katie Barclay, The University of Adelaide When I was born, my parents were living in the outbuildings of an early nineteenth century gentleman’s farmhouse, Auchlochan House, built on the ruins of an even older farm, in rural Lanarkshire in Scotland....
From: Histories of Emotion on 30 Jun 2020

Patron saints in livery company pageantry

The period 1558-1642 was a time of great debate and upheaval over religious belief in England. Following a return to Catholicism under Mary I, the reign of Elizabeth I was when the Protestant beliefs of the Church of England were fully set out. There...

Early American Women Unmasked

A special edition of #ColonialCouture, a Junto roundtable on fashion as history in early American life.  Protective face coverings have emerged as a potent, multifaceted metaphor for the Covid-19 pandemic. Despite inconsistent examples set by elected...
From: The Junto on 5 May 2020

Mantua of the Month – May

Mantua, 1760s © Victoria and Albert Museum, London This mantua and petticoat dates from the 1760s. It is shaped from French silk, and features an undulating ermine motif. The design mimics the ermine fur trim, which is often seen in royal portraiture....
From: A Fashionable Business on 2 May 2020

Plague Time: Intoxicating Spaces and Pestilence in Seventeenth-Century London

One of the most challenging aspects of the lockdown and social distancing measures necessitated by COVID–19 are the restrictions placed on the intoxicating spaces of everyday life. The inability to visit coffee shops, pubs, restaurants and tea bars...
From: Intoxicating Spaces on 22 Apr 2020

WFH 2: Tradesmen and Tools for Working from Home, Chapter 1

For this second instalment of ‘Working from Home’ in early modern England, I’m going to take a look at some of the tools and materials urban individuals used as part of their trade in two posts. The first looks at the wider uses of tools...
From: Middling Culture on 21 Apr 2020

CALL FOR PAPERS: RSA

Philadelphia Marriott DowntownCourtyard Philadelphia Downtown2–4 April 2020Conference hashtag: #RenSA20Submission deadline: 15 August 2019The submission website will open later this month (June 2019). The link will be posted in this space. A current...
From: The Renaissance Diary on 20 Apr 2020

Mantua of the Month – April

Court Mantua, c. 1760s, National Trust Each month I will be doing a short feature on a gown that catches my fancy as part of the ‘Mantua of the Month’ feature on my blog page. For April 2020, I have chosen this Court Mantua, which was featured...
From: A Fashionable Business on 18 Apr 2020

Mantua of the Month – March

Mantua of the Month is a fun feature on my blog page, which draws attention to the material culture of the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. The first mantua to be featured (admittedly I am publishing this a little late!) is this Court dress, c. 1750...
From: A Fashionable Business on 6 Apr 2020

Religious Visions of Revolutions Past, or “Faith in Revolution” Wrap-Up

This post is a part of our “Faith in Revolution” series, which explores the ways that religious ideologies and communities shaped the revolutionary era. Check out the entire series. By Bryan A. Banks In October 2018, I stumbled upon a peculiar...
From: Age of Revolutions on 16 Mar 2020

Mary Marsden #HerBook

The Twitter hashtag #HerBook and blog Early Modern Female Book Ownership have revealed much about early modern women’s literacy, their reading habits and book ownership, and it seems particularly fitting to promote the growing scholarship on these...
From: A Fashionable Business on 8 Mar 2020

Intoxicating Pharmacies? Apothecary Shops and New Intoxicants in Amsterdam, 1600–185

Thinking about intoxicating spaces, apothecary shops are probably not what first springs to mind. Yet, these places are very relevant in discussing the assimilation of new intoxicants into European diets. It may seem strange to us today, but they virtually...
From: Intoxicating Spaces on 6 Mar 2020

A Matter of Measure: Tobacco in Seventeenth-Century German Satire

A German broadside published in 1658. Eight vignette etchings and a poem recount the story of tobacco’s arrival in Europe, and its ‘praiseworthy use by some German heroes/as well as the same’s real power and effect’. In the first...
From: Intoxicating Spaces on 28 Feb 2020

Ground Level: Exploring London’s Historical Coffeehouses

One of early modern London’s most common intoxicating spaces was the coffeehouse; a 1739 survey by historian and topographer William Maitland identified 551 institutions in the capital (although the real figure was probably higher), while by the...
From: Intoxicating Spaces on 11 Feb 2020

8 Intoxicating Objects from Nordiska Museet

A key part of the Intoxicating Spaces project is our work with schools in the UK, Germany, the Netherlands, and Sweden. Back in October, a group of 30 pupils from our Stockholm partner school Nacka Gymnasium joined our Swedish research team at Nordiska...
From: Intoxicating Spaces on 29 Jan 2020

Furnishing the tower house: nobles, lairds, merchants & craftsmen

This post is about the furnishings of tower houses, and the documentary record. The first thing to note is that Scottish furnishings from the sixteenth- and seventeenth centuries are very rare. This may be contrasted with the apparent survival of quantities...
From: Objects and the archive on 15 Jan 2020

Anna of Denmark: Costume, Colours, and Identities in Scotland

This is a transcript of a talk I gave at Riddles Court in Edinburgh and Jesus College, Oxford, in 2019 about Anna of Denmark in Scotland, 1589 to 1603 Introduction In Scotland Anna of Denmark had her own household separate from the kings’. These...
From: Objects and the archive on 11 Jan 2020

C.J. Grant, Twelfth Night Characters, 1833

The 5th January marks the arrival of Twelfth Night and the end of Christmas. Although barely acknowledged today – other than by the dour reminder that today is the day on which we must take down our Christmas decorations in order to avoid a run...
From: The Print Shop Window on 5 Jan 2020

New Year’s Eve, 19

What are you wearing on New Year’s Eve?  I’m still dealing with this bum leg, so it will likely be sweatpants for me, unfortunately, but I have to say I that some version of “domestic attire” has been the norm for the...
From: streets of salem on 30 Dec 2019

A Fourth Revolution Around the Sun

By Cindy Ermus and Bryan A. Banks  The last year has been a productive one at Age of Revolutions. The first three were whirlwinds in their own right (see our wrap-ups here: 1, 2, 3), but this last year has seen our website change in some...
From: Age of Revolutions on 21 Nov 2019

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Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.