The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "medicine"

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Your search for posts with tags containing medicine found 1061 posts

Probing the Tale of Warren and Jeffries

I’ve just shared the two versions of the story of Dr. Joseph Warren sneaking across the siege lines in early June 1775 to try to talk Dr. John Jeffries into heading the provincial medical corps.Both versions present Dr. Jeffries as a badass: so...
From: Boston 1775 on 20 Jan 2021

The man who printed the world of plants

Abraham Ortelius (1527–1598) is justifiably famous for having produced the world’s first modern atlas, that is a bound, printed, uniform collection of maps, his Theatrum Orbis Terrarum. Ortelius was a wealthy businessman and paid for the publication...
From: The Renaissance Mathematicus on 20 Jan 2021

“The connection of my father and General Joseph Warren, M.D.”

In 1875, Bostonians were very excited about the Centennial of the start of the Revolutionary War. Naturally, that included the editorial staff of the Boston Medical and Surgical Journal.People at that magazine asked Dr. John Jeffries (1796-1876), whose...
From: Boston 1775 on 19 Jan 2021

Dr. Jeffries and Dr. Warren

When I started looking at Dr. John Jeffries’s records of caring for young smallpox inoculatees in June 1775, I hoped to find clues to his whereabouts during that month.For almost two hundred years at least, a story has circulated about Jeffries...
From: Boston 1775 on 18 Jan 2021

How Aged Was William Northage?

This evening I came across an example of the importance of checking original documents where possible to confirm transcriptions.In a 1993 article in the Bulletin of the History of Medicine titled “John Jeffries and the Struggle Against Smallpox...
From: Boston 1775 on 17 Jan 2021

January 13

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago this week? “The most effectual Medicine that has ever yet been offered to the Public, for the Cure of an inveterate Scurvy.” John Norton, surgeon and proprietor of “Maredant’s...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 13 Jan 2021

Learning to Walk

The baby walker is a device to support an infant who is not yet independently mobile to ‘walk’ around. In the past they were thought to aid the child’s development as she learned to walk. Images of the baby walker date back at least...
From: Early Modern Medicine on 12 Jan 2021

The Mystery of Dr. Martyn

As I described yesterday, in the late 1760s Nathaniel Martyn held a respected position in rural Massachusetts society. Youngest son of the minister at Northborough, he had become a physician and landowner in Harvard and married a young woman from Bolton....
From: Boston 1775 on 10 Jan 2021

How Natty Martyn Grew Up

Last September, we got a passing glimpse of fifteen-year-old Natty Martyn, youngest son of the minister in Northborough in 1756. Natty had a bad sore, and his family had begun to despair for him. The Rev. John Martyn took his son to Dr. Ebenezer Dexter...
From: Boston 1775 on 9 Jan 2021

Weight loss Wonders

Fad diets are  perhaps a modern concept, but if we look back to the seventeenth century we can find some pretty interesting weight loss remedies. As we have seen previously some medical writers felt that the shape of your belly had a lot to say about...
From: Early Modern Medicine on 11 Sep 2013

Bulk Medicine and Waged Labor in Eighteenth-Century London

By Zachary Dorner In the eighteenth century, druggists, chemists, and apothecaries began producing medicines in larger quantities for sale in a variety of markets, resulting in a more coherent manufacturing sector in Britain. Making medicines at...
From: The Recipes Project on 24 Dec 2020

Tales from the Archives: Was There a Recipe for Korean Ginseng?

By Daniel Trambaiolo As all of us continue to watch the COVID-19 vaccine rollout, and wait with cautious optimism for a time when we can heal and recover, I’d like to take a moment to revisit another medical breakthrough that required patience of...
From: The Recipes Project on 17 Dec 2020

December 8

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today? “Fresh from one of the best Druggists in London.” Like many other apothecaries in colonial America, Amos Throop of Providence resorted to newspaper advertising to promote...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 8 Dec 2020

Yellow Fever and Church Attendance

John Adams was certain he made a mistake by going to church. Philadelphia’s yellow fever outbreak only ended in November 1793. On Sunday, December... The post Yellow Fever and Church Attendance appeared first on Journal of the American Revolution.

An Eradication: Empire, Enslaved Children, and the Whitewashing of Vaccine History

By Farren E. Yero On February 12, 1804, at seven in the morning, an eight-year-old girl stood in the living room of Dr. don Tomás Romay. Her arm still throbbed, a slight if persistent hum that seemed to invite her touch. Involuntarily, she reached...
From: Age of Revolutions on 7 Dec 2020

Exploring London’s Intoxicating Spaces Through Mudlarking

The River Thames as it flows through London is tidal, meaning twice per day part of the riverbed is exposed for a few hours. This area, known as the Thames foreshore, is a rich archive of (among other things) the remnants of two millennia of the city’s...
From: Intoxicating Spaces on 2 Dec 2020

Samuel Plummer and His Father’s Sword

Here’s one more story from my foray up the coast from Boston to Gloucester.Dr. Samuel Plumer, the man who was keeping George Penn enslaved in 1770, had a son, also named Samuel. The younger man tended to spell his surname Plummer. Young Samuel Plummer...
From: Boston 1775 on 25 Nov 2020

November 23

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today? “Any Gentleman Practitioner may be served … by Letter as well as if present.” Joseph Tilton advertised a “compleat and general Assortment of the best Drugs...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 23 Nov 2020

A New Government in Britain in 177

As the year draws to a close, I’m looking back on some of the notable events of 1770 that I didn’t discuss on their Sestercentennial anniversaries. In January 1770, the Duke of Grafton’s government collapsed in London. The duke had become...
From: Boston 1775 on 17 Nov 2020

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Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.