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Your search for posts with tags containing medicine found 1034 posts

The Career of Dr. Bela Lincoln

When Bela Lincoln was growing up in Hingham in the 1740s, his father—a wealthy farmer, town official, and militia colonel—insisted on sending him to Harvard College.Some people didn’t think Bela had the smarts for it. Others felt that...
From: Boston 1775 on 24 Oct 2020

Bertomeu-Sánchez, “Colic of Madrid” in Social History of Medicine, Aug

José Ramón Bertomeu-Sánchez, “Colic of Madrid (1788-1814): Experts, Poisons, Politics, and War at the End of the Ancien Régime in Spain,” Social History of Medicine 33/3 (2020).
From: EM Spanish History Notes on 21 Oct 2020

Starting from Scratch: Combating “the Itch”

Although it may not have been fatal, scabies brought more patients to British Army hospitals during the Seven Years’ War than any other condition,... The post Starting from Scratch: Combating “the Itch” appeared first on Journal of the...

The Last Years of Parson Wibird

To answer yesterday’s question, the Rev. Anthony Wibird, minister of the north precinct of Braintree (which became Quincy) never married.Even as he discussed marriage with the parson as another young man attracted to Hannah Quincy, John Adams may...
From: Boston 1775 on 17 Oct 2020

A Portrait of Parson Wibird

In the letter discussed yesterday, Mary Cranch wrote that she learned the news that “mrs P——l——r was brought to Bed” with a mysterious new baby from “mr wibird.”That was the Rev. Anthony Wibird (1729-1800),...
From: Boston 1775 on 15 Oct 2020

October 8

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today? “All the Patenteed Medicines, too many to be enumerated in an Advertisement.” Oliver Smith advertised a “compleat Assortment of the very best DRUGGS and MEDICINES”...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 8 Oct 2020

Around the Table: The Making and Knowing Project

This month on Around the Table, we have a very special treat. Many of our contributors have been a part of the Making and Knowing Project and we have enjoyed occasional updates on the project throughout the years. Here, we have an update and reflection...
From: The Recipes Project on 8 Oct 2020

It cost me a cold

Travelling and bathing In June 1645 John Evelyn travelled from Rome to Venice. The journey left him extremely weary and so he decided to visit the ‘Bagnias’ to take a bath. He described the experience as follows: [The bath] treat after the...
From: Early Modern Medicine on 7 Oct 2020

Outmoded Midwives?

Gender wars of the medical kind for this week’s #SalemSuffrageSaturday post, although I am uncertain of how much of a battle was waged here in Salem. Commencing in the seventeenth century with the efforts of the emigre Chamberlen brothers, armed...
From: streets of salem on 3 Oct 2020

Perpetual Prognostications: Medieval ‘Recipes for Living’

The year is 1459, and you are a relatively prosperous landowner in Oxfordshire. Now that spring is in the air, you must go and visit your merchant friend in London, but you find yourself uneasy about the journey. With the poor condition of recently thawed...
From: The Recipes Project on 1 Oct 2020

“Onesimus and Rev. Cotton Mather” Program, 1 Oct.

On Thursday, 1 October, I’ll be part of an online discussion through the Freedom Forum on “Onesimus and Rev. Cotton Mather: Race, Religion, and the Press in Colonial America.” The Freedom Forum’s description says:The third program...
From: Boston 1775 on 28 Sep 2020

New Research on Vikings

DNA studies are revealing new information on complicated ethnic backgrounds of Viking warriors and traders in medieval Europe. A research team led by a professor at the University of Copenhagen has analyzed the genomes of 443 bodies buried in Viking...

What Killed Prisoners of War?—A Medical Investigation

Editor’s Note: This article contains graphic medical descriptions. Throughout the Revolutionary War, prisoners learned that dysentery accompanied starvation. Confined to the prison ship Jersey in... The post What Killed Prisoners of War?—A...

Dr. Dexter’s Boys

When Lydia (Woods Dexter) Curtis died at the end of 1772, her three surviving sons were all in their late teens, of age to be apprentices. They may therefore have left the household of their stepfather, Dr. Samuel Curtis.Lydia was from a large and established...
From: Boston 1775 on 19 Sep 2020

The Short Marriage of Dr. Samuel and Lydia Curtis

In March 1769, as I recounted yesterday, Dr. Ebenezer Dexter of Marlborough died. He left a wife, Lydia, and four young sons.By July a young physician named Samuel Curtis was boarding in the Dexter house, treating the late doctor’s patients.On 30...
From: Boston 1775 on 18 Sep 2020

Young Doctors in Marlborough

Yesterday I introduced the figure of Dr. Ebenezer Dexter, Marlborough’s leading doctor in the 1760s.On 3 May 1769, however, the Rev. Ebenezer Parkman of nearby Westborough wrote in his diary: “Dr. [Edward] Flynt came from Dr. Dexter, and says...
From: Boston 1775 on 17 Sep 2020

Snails in medicine – past and present

By Claire Burridge  A treatment for teary eyes (Ad lacrimas oculorum): Grind together frankincense, mastic, and snails with their shells. Apply to the forehead in laurel leaves in two parts. It is tried and tested. (Tus et mastice et cocleas cum...
From: The Recipes Project on 17 Sep 2020

Dr. Ebenezer Dexter Practicing Medicine in Marlborough

Ebenezer Dexter was born in 1729, son of the Rev. Samuel Dexter of Dedham.Ebenezer chose to go into medicine, and after marrying Lydia Woods, daughter of a selectman in Marlborough, he set up his practice in that town. In 1754, the year of their marriage,...
From: Boston 1775 on 16 Sep 2020

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Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.