The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "midwives"

Your search for posts with tags containing midwives found 15 posts

Forget Leaving Room for Jesus: Fornication and Community Control in Transitional New England

The Perceptions of Pregnancy blog, like the Researchers’ Network, aims to reach beyond boundaries and borders, and to facilitate an international and interdisciplinary conversation on pregnancy and its associated bodily and emotional experiences...
From: Perceptions of Pregnancy on 23 Feb 2021

Outmoded Midwives?

Gender wars of the medical kind for this week’s #SalemSuffrageSaturday post, although I am uncertain of how much of a battle was waged here in Salem. Commencing in the seventeenth century with the efforts of the emigre Chamberlen brothers, armed...
From: streets of salem on 3 Oct 2020

Midwives and Gossips

Tuesday 5 May 2020 is International Day of the Midwife, which falls during the World Health Organisation’s Year of the Nurse and Midwife making it a double celebration. Midwifery and childbirth is something we’ve discussed a few times on this...
From: Early Modern Medicine on 5 May 2020

“One hates to be always kissed”

Visits to and from friends seems to have occupied the time of many young women like SARAH EVE in Philadelphia in 1773. In this entry she identifies one of the customs she dislikes. February 26th. — As fine a day as in April. In the morning Dr. [William]...
From: In the Words of Women on 13 Jan 2020

CALL FOR PAPERS: Maternal Influences in the Medieval and Early Modern World

4 November 2019Queen Mary University of Londonmaternalinfluences.home.blogWe are seeking participants for a workshop on medieval and early modern motherhood. In recent years, scholarship has sought to illuminate motherhood in the medieval and early modern...
From: The Renaissance Diary on 4 Nov 2019

Instruments or hands? ‘Nature’ and the practice of obstetric surgeons in early eighteenth-century Germany

If you wanted to edify yourself in 1790s Germany on the history of midwifery, you might have consulted J. G. Krünitz’s Oekonomische Encyklopädie (published 1773–1858), the most comprehensive German-language encyclopaedia of its time,...
From: Perceptions of Pregnancy on 15 May 2018

A Midwife Explains it All (1671)

For this post I am flouting all the rules I set for myself regarding sources and time period, but I just couldn’t resist. You will perhaps see why as you read on. The setting is England rather than America and the time is 1671 not the mid to late...
From: In the Words of Women on 24 Oct 2016

The Maladies of Midwives

While doing some research for the book Sara and I are writing on diseases and medicines in the early modern era I came across a book published in 1703 by Italian doctor Bernardino Ramazzini. Sometimes referred to as the father
From: Early Modern Medicine on 3 Aug 2016

Midwifery and Mystery...in 19th century New England

Writers are frequently enjoined to "write what they know," and my guest blogger today has certainly taken that message to heart. Edith Maxwell, author of the the forthcoming historical mystery, Delivering the Truth, features a Quaker midwife in 19th century...
From: Susanna Calkins, Author on 25 Mar 2016

Midwifery Today Conference

What: Midwifery Today Conference “Pillars of Midwifery: Insight, Information, and Intuition” Where: Bad Wildbad, Germany When: 21-25 October 2015 Registration: 8 June 2015 (early) These are some of the topics we plan to present at the conference....
From: Perceptions of Pregnancy on 30 Mar 2015

Men at the door

The Perceptions of Pregnancy blog, like the Researchers’ Network, aims to reach beyond boundaries and borders, and to facilitate an international and interdisciplinary conversation on pregnancy and its associated bodily and emotional experiences from...
From: Perceptions of Pregnancy on 9 Feb 2015

A dose of witchcraft

Coming down with a dose of Witchcraft -– a Halloween special Witches were a real presence in early modern lives. Many elderly women healers risked accusations of witchcraft. Indeed new midwives, for example, had to swear an oath that they would not...
From: Early Modern Medicine on 29 Oct 2014

The Midwife of St. Giles Cripplegate

The Perceptions of Pregnancy blog, like the Researchers’ Network, aims to reach beyond boundaries and borders, and to facilitate an international and interdisciplinary conversation on pregnancy and its associated bodily and emotional experiences from...
From: Perceptions of Pregnancy on 29 Sep 2014

The Mistaken Midwife

Midwives have been mentioned often on this blog. They were a central feature of many women’s birthing experiences in the early modern period. Their work, character and bodily condition have, at various points, all come under the scrutiny of their...
From: Early Modern Medicine on 13 Aug 2014

Birth, Infanticide and Midwifery

Dr Chris Langley Birth, Infanticide and Midwifery in early modern Scotland. The Church of Scotland was obsessed with sex. More accurately, ecclesiastical leaders in sixteenth and seventeenth century Scotland were alarmed by the loose morality of their...
From: Early Modern Medicine on 14 Aug 2013

Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.