The Early Modern Commons

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Your search for posts with tags containing mind found 35 posts

Gender, institutions and the changing uses of petitions in 18th-century London

word frquencies An extended version of my paper for the April 2019 workshop held by the AHRC Research Network on Petitions and Petitioning from the Medieval Period to the Present, on the theme Petitioning in Context: when and why do petitions matter?...
From: Early Modern Notes on 23 Apr 2019

Old Bailey Voices: gender, speech and outcomes in the Old Bailey, part 1

The Old Bailey Voices data is the result of work I’ve done for the Voices of Authority research theme for the Digital Panopticon project. This will be the first of a few blog posts in which I start to dig deeper into the data. First I’ll review...
From: Early Modern Notes on 16 Dec 2018

The shoehorn that never was – Jane Ayres, 1595

  It all began with a letter to the society… then an email from a PhD candidate and ended with the 1595 shoe horn evaporating in a cloud of illegibility. Let’s go back to where the confusion began, in early 1921. An Elizabethan Shoe...

Talk About Change: LDNA at Festival of the Mind

Last weekend, Linguistic DNA & friends took over the Spiegeltent in Sheffield city centre, as part of the University’s Festival of the Mind. Spiegeltents are a Belgian invention–tents decorated internally with mirrors, creating the perfect...
From: Linguistic DNA on 28 Sep 2018

Late Summer on Brook’s heath

By Sara Marie Westh Copyright: Peter Brook (1971) The images from Peter Brook’s cinematic version of King Lear have been burned onto the retinas of countless Shakespeareans since its release in 1971. The stark landscape of the movie shows a...
From: Blogging Shakespeare on 28 Aug 2018

Westminster Coroners Inquests 1760-1799, Part 1

This will be a post in two parts about data relating to the series of Westminster Coroner’s Inquests on London Lives, which cover the period 1760-1799. … Posted at In Her Mind’s Eye
From: Early Modern Notes on 23 Jun 2018

Talk About Change

In a time when events seem ever and ever out of our control, writing is resistance. –Our Mel. In April, Linguistic DNA began collaborating with local social entrepreneurs Our Mel to do some collective thinking about the power of language. This
From: Linguistic DNA on 15 Jun 2018

MEAD Pauper Apprentices Philadelphia 1751-99

This post takes a look at an open dataset available through the University of Pennsylvania’s open access repository. The dataset, Indentures and Apprentices made by Philadelphia Overseers of the Poor, 1751-1799 (created by Billy G. Smith), is one...
From: Early Modern Notes on 30 Apr 2018

Old Bailey Proceedings Part 1: Offences

If you know me, the topic of this first post may come as unsurprising but also a bit eyebrow-raising. “Sharon, you’ve been working on the Old Bailey Online project (OBO) since forever. Aren’t you bored with it yet?” … Posted...
From: Early Modern Notes on 17 Apr 2018

Theory of Mind, Cognitive Cultural Studies, and Eighteenth-Century Literature

Henry Robert Morland, Woman Reading by a Paper-Bell Shade (1766), Credit: Yale Center for British Art, Paul Mellon Collection In 2012, literary scholar Natalie Phillips and a team of scientists at Stanford published the results of a study in which they...
From: The 18th-Century Common on 14 Mar 2018

Holiday Gift Ideas for the Historically Minded

Jeff and I gathered a short list of holiday items for the historically-minded shopper. This year, we are highlighting books by women authors and businesses owned and run by women.  Please note that we are patrons of these vendors and authors and...
From: SilkDamask on 9 Dec 2017

Astrophil and Stella, Sonnet 99

When far spent night persuades each mortal eye, To whom nor art nor nature granteth light, To lay his then mark-wanting shafts of sight, Closed with their quivers, in sleep’s armoury; With windows ope then most my mind doth...
From: Blogging Sidney's Sonnets on 15 Apr 2016

Art in the City: Piercing the Veil, Simmons & Simmons

Above the door to this City law firm’s auditorium hangs a pink neon sign: ‘Trust Me’. It’s far from your average bit of corporate art; it’s a Tracey Emin piece bought by Simmons & Simmons several years ago. Emin is nothing...
From: Parthenissa on 13 Feb 2016

The Hinson shoehorn is for sale

I’ve recently had contact with Richard Gardner, of Richard Gardner Antiques about the sale of Mindum’s Hinson shoehorn from 1600. Permission has been given to Richard for the catalogue to quote me extensively,  and the website provides...

William bloody Morris’ bloody powderhorn

Imagine if you will, the Museum of London, late on an uncommonly warm summer afternoon. The kids are tired and grumpy, I’m already worn out from three weeks of travelling and we’re belting through the last few cabinets in the Great Fire exhibition...

Colloque : « MIND CONTROL – Conditionnement psychologique et art expérimental pendant la guerre froide (1960-1980) » (Paris, 18 décembre 2015)

MIND CONTROL – Conditionnement psychologique et art expérimental pendant la guerre froide (1960-1980)   Colloque international 18 décembre 2015 INHA – 2, rue Vivienne 75002 Paris – Auditorium   Université...
From: Le blog de l'APAHAU on 2 Dec 2015

Two more shoe horns by Robert Mindum

I’ll do the disclosure part first. The 1596 horn is to be auctioned on 24 November as lot 134 by Matthew Barton Ltd. I’ve been in contact with Matthew to discuss the content of the catalogue listing for this lot (go to p39), and have been...

Understanding Motivation: Why do some writers complete a novel...and others do not?

 What motivates some writers to complete a novel? This question has been on my mind for a while. Last week, I did a keynote for another university on motivating and engaging students in higher education (a facet of my day job I won’t go into...
From: Susanna Calkins, Author on 13 Oct 2015

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Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.