The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "moon"

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Your search for posts with tags containing moon found 61 posts

Shakespeare and the moon

Astronaut on the moon, 1969 It’s fifty years since the first moon landing in July 1969, and most people who were alive at the time must have memories of it. My father woke me up to watch Neil Armstrong become the first human ever to tread on the...
From: The Shakespeare blog on 23 Jul 2019

Glassware of an Alchemist

Antonio Neri (1598-1600),"Libro intitulato Il tesoro del mondo" f. 38In the introduction of L'Arte Vetraria, his 1612 book on glassmaking, Antonio Neri discusses the technical and scientific uses of glass. He rattles off an impressive list of items,...
From: Conciatore on 22 Jul 2019

Veins of the Earth

Antonio Neri, "The Mineral Gold"Neri 1598-1600 (Ferguson 67), f. 5r.Over a decade before Antonio Neri wrote L’Arte Vetraria, the book on glassmaking for which he would become famous, he wrote an illustrated manuscript on the subject of alchemy....
From: Conciatore on 1 Jul 2019

Laughing in the Fern

Allain Manesson Mallet  1719,"Der Mont. – Lune"In Chapter 5 of L'Arte Vetraria, Antonio Neri shows how to extract salt for glass from fern plants in an evocative recipe. Fern was and still is widely abundant in Tuscany. It presented a...
From: Conciatore on 13 May 2019

Laughing in the Fern

Allain Manesson Mallet  1719,"Der Mont. – Lune"In Chapter 5 of L'Arte Vetraria, Antonio Neri shows how to extract salt for glass from fern plants in an evocative recipe. Fern was and still is widely abundant in Tuscany. It presented a...
From: Conciatore on 12 Dec 2018

Alchemical Glassware

Antonio Neri (1598-1600),"Libro intitulato Il tesoro del mondo" f. 38In the introduction of L'Arte Vetraria, his 1612 book on glassmaking, Antonio Neri discusses the technical and scientific uses of glass. He rattles off an impressive list of items,...
From: Conciatore on 26 Oct 2018

Veins of the Earth

Antonio Neri, "The Mineral Gold"Neri 1598-2000 (Ferguson 67), f. 5r.Over a decade before Antonio Neri wrote L’Arte Vetraria, the book on glassmaking for which he would become famous, he wrote an illustrated manuscript on the subject of alchemy....
From: Conciatore on 21 Sep 2018

The Woman in the Moon, Edward’s Boys: Review by Leah Scragg

We are thankful to Leah Scragg for her review, here, of Edward’s Boys’ The Woman in the Moon (8-11 March 2018). You can read the director, Perry Mills, on the production elsewhere on our site, and we also have interviews with the...
From: Before Shakespeare on 3 May 2018

The Woman in the Moon: In Conversation with Edward’s Boys

It’s Friday, and we’re hurrying across London Bridge in the rain towards a part-carpeted Methodist Church in London’s Eastcheap: that Elizabethan-sounding nook somewhere loosely between Crutched Friars and Leadenhall (more Tudor echoes)....
From: Before Shakespeare on 13 Mar 2018

Galilean Moon Crackers

Wandering through Trader Joe’s this morning, I stumbled across an excellent and under explored career for historians of science: marketing and advertising. Picking up some snacks, I noticed the Cheddar Rocket Crackers. In typical Trader Joe’s...
From: Darin Hayton on 12 Mar 2018

Women in the Moons

Last year I saw Dolphin’s Back’s Woman in the Moon; last night I saw Edward’s Boy’s Woman in the Moon. This is presumably the first time in history anyone has been able to see multiple Women in the Moons, and we’re very...
From: Before Shakespeare on 10 Mar 2018

My New Book Deal

I’m so excited to announce that the subject of MY NEXT BOOK will be on the birth of plastic surgery told through the incredible story of Harold Gillies, the pioneering and eccentric surgeon who first united art and medicine to address the horrific...
From: The Chirurgeon's Apprentice on 21 Feb 2018

Angles on Shakespeare in Stratford 2018

Nothing of Woman in Me poster There’s never any shortage of Shakespeare-related events in Stratford, not just performances at the Royal Shakespeare Company or activities at the Shakespeare properties managed by the Shakespeare Birthplace Trust....
From: The Shakespeare blog on 21 Feb 2018

Laughing in the Ferm

Allain Manesson Mallet  1719,"Der Mont. – Lune"In Chapter 5 of L'Arte Vetraria, Antonio Neri shows how to extract salt for glass from fern plants in an evocative recipe. Fern was and still is widely abundant in Tuscany. It presented a...
From: Conciatore on 12 Feb 2018

“Fly me to the moon!”

Edward’s Boys’ Director, Perry Mills, introduces their latest production, in collaboration with Before Shakespeare, John Lyly’s The Woman in the Moon.  To read about Edward’s Boys in rehearsal at our conference in August...
From: Before Shakespeare on 8 Feb 2018

The Woman in the Moon: Interviews with the Cast

During rehearsals for James Wallace’s The Dolphin’s Back production of John Lyly’s The Woman in the Moon (Shakespeare’s Globe, Sam Wanamaker Playhouse) back in August 2017, we had time to catch up with a few of the cast...
From: Before Shakespeare on 14 Dec 2017

Alchemical Glassware

Antonio Neri (1598-1600), "Libro intitulato Il tesoro del mondo" f. 38 In the introduction of L'Arte Vetraria, his 1612 book on glassmaking, Antonio Neri discusses the technical and scientific uses of glass. He rattles off an impressive list of...
From: Conciatore on 11 Dec 2017

Veins of the Earth

Antonio Neri, "The Mineral Gold" Neri 1598-2000 (Ferguson 67), f. 5r. Over a decade before Antonio Neri wrote L’Arte Vetraria, the book on glassmaking for which he would become famous, he wrote an illustrated manuscript on the subject of...
From: Conciatore on 3 Nov 2017

Venus’s Palaces

She’s got it,Yeah baby, she’s got it—Shocking Blue For 1570s and 1580s theatregoers, love was all around. One of the defining characteristics of the earliest surviving commercial plays is the predominance of the character Venus or her...
From: Before Shakespeare on 4 Oct 2017

Laughing in the Fern

Allain Manesson Mallet  1719, "Der Mont. – Lune" In Chapter 5 of L'Arte Vetraria, Antonio Neri shows how to extract salt for glass from fern plants in an evocative recipe. Fern was and still is widely abundant in Tuscany. It presented...
From: Conciatore on 31 Mar 2017

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Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.