The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "murder"

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Your search for posts with tags containing murder found 137 posts

A Murder-Suicide in Stephen Basdeo’s Victorian Ancestors: The Case of George Leedham (1871)

By Stephen Basdeo I have been doing a lot of work this past year tracing my ancestors and discovering their history. Imagine how delighted (wrong word, perhaps!) I was when I discovered that, on my mother’s side (my father is from Guyana, and it’s...

The Fine Art of Murder

Stephen Basdeo This website usually deals with the ‘fun’ side of crime history by discussing mobsters, outlaws, and highwaymen. Yet not all portrayals of crime and criminals were wild and brave characters as Walter Scott depicted them, and...

The Laws of Moses…and of England?

Posted by Krista J. Kesselring, 6 July 2020. Facing the prospect of executions resuming for federal prisoners in the U.S., one might well reflect on past debates about the use of the death penalty. In other times and places, which heinous crimes, exactly,...
From: Legal History Miscellany on 6 Jul 2020

“Is she or isn’t she?” How an age-old plea of pregnancy saved women from execution

I was all set to give a talk on 1 May at the National Theatre in London exploring themes in Lucy Kirkwood’s play The Welkin, which was then in performance. Of course, the Coronavirus lockdown meant everything was cancelled, so I am instead posting...
From: Naomi Clifford on 10 May 2020

William, the ‘Wicked Lord’ Byron – actress abducter & cowardly killer?

Dearest readers, A new video is UP! See below for a quick intro to the angry, dissipated career of William, 5th Lord Byron – known to history as ‘the Wicked Lord’ or ‘Devil Byron’/ Features actress abduction, a wolf, &...
From: The History of Love on 10 Apr 2020

Did Birmingham artist Samuel Lines know murdered Mary Ashford?

Early in the morning of Tuesday 27 May 1817, a labourer came across a pair of boots, a bonnet and bundle of clothes near a stagnant pit of water just north of the village of Erdington near Birmingham. He surmised that someone had gone into the pit and...
From: Naomi Clifford on 30 Mar 2020

Celebrating (?) a Hundred Years since the start of Prohibition!

Chicago Daily Tribune Jan 16, 1920 One hundred years ago, on January 17, 1920 at 12:01 AM, the United States collectively lost its mind.Well, perhaps less dramatically... the 18th Amendment officially went into effect across the United States and...
From: Susanna Calkins, Author on 17 Jan 2020

Lies, Damned Lies, and Statistics

By Cassie Watson; posted 11 December 2019. As the current election campaign draws to a close amid increasingly shrill claims and counterclaims, I am reminded of a saying that, while common today, appears to have originated around the time of a much earlier...
From: Legal History Miscellany on 11 Dec 2019

Unsolved Early Modern Murder Mysteries

By Krista J. Kesselring, 10  October 2019 Early modern coroners and their juries appear to have had extraordinarily high success rates in identifying killers for the people they deemed to be victims of homicide. Modern commentators sometimes assume...
From: Legal History Miscellany on 10 Oct 2019

The Long Arm of the Law Cut Short

By Cassie Watson; posted 31 July 2019. On an April evening in 1820, within clear view of her mother-in-law, a young woman dosed her husband’s gruel with a substance that immediately caused pain, vomiting, tremors and extreme weakness. While those...
From: Legal History Miscellany on 31 Jul 2019

The longevity of Mary Aubry who was executed by burning in 1688

Sometimes during my research, which currently involves collecting and collating information about the treatment of a corpse after death, I come across the story of an individual who has sparked something within the minds of his or her contemporaries and...
From: We-hang-out-a-lot-in-cemeteries on 30 Jul 2019

Writing about Murder Knocks Twice

The launch of MURDER KNOCKS TWICE has been such a whirlwind!  But I do enjoy meeting readers at my book events, and telling new stories about my research and writing.I've also had the chance to write a few blog posts on different aspects of my research...
From: Susanna Calkins, Author on 26 May 2019

At last, MURDER KNOCKS TWICE is out in the world...

There's a funny thing about persistence that writers often talk about. We talk about continuing despite the odds, mustering up the courage to keep writing even when things get hard, just pushing on even when the outcome is not known.This is what I felt...
From: Susanna Calkins, Author on 30 Apr 2019

Finding inspiration in 1920s headlines

Chicago Daily Tribune (1923-1963); Dec 5, 1929; ProQuest Historical Newspapers: Chicago Tribune pg. 16 Every writer I know is regularly asked, "Where do you get your ideas?" Some authors love this question, some hate it. For me, I'm somewhere in between.With...
From: Susanna Calkins, Author on 6 Apr 2019

Book Review: An Instance of the Fingerpost by Iain Pears

An Instance of the Fingerpost, published in 1998, is a rather large work of historical fiction – 704 pages long! As I had this read aloud to me by my husband whenever we had some free time – which was not often – so it took over a year...
From: The Seventeenth Century Lady on 10 Feb 2019

Depictions of women in woodcuts for criminal biographies

Throughout the early modern period little care was taken in presenting realistically identifiable women on the front of pamphlet literature, especially those pamphlets that depict female criminals. This is apparent in the ‘Life’ of Catherine...
From: We-hang-out-a-lot-in-cemeteries on 21 Nov 2018

From 1667 London to 1929 Chicago...

It's the Bees' Knees! Well the cocktail break is finally over and I have returned to my blog!!!I’m no longer entrenched in the gritty plague-ridden world of 17th century London—I’ve now ventured into 1920s Chicago—a world that...
From: Susanna Calkins, Author on 21 Sep 2018

Winston Graham’s World War II novels

Bossiney Cove — the central sections of Strangers Meeting takes place in Trembeth Cove, Cornwall Since coming abroad something of the subterranean disquiet which existed everywhere had affected his imagination and he quite often awoke from dreaming...
From: Ellen And Jim Have A Blog, Two on 8 Jul 2018

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Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.