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Medieval and Early Modern Centre April Newsletter

Medieval and Early Modern Centre, April 2022 Newsletter April is a quieter month for events: Easter, mid-semester break, and Anzac Day land squarely in its middle and – hopefully – give us all some much-needed respite. This month’s MEMC lunchtime...
From: ANZAMEMS Inc on 20 Apr 2022

Happy Birthday, Mathew Carey!

Though Benjamin Franklin is often considered the patron saint of American advertising in the popular press, I believe that his efforts pale in comparison to the contributions made by Mathew Carey (1760-1839) in the final decades of the eighteenth century....
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 28 Jan 2022

November 13

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago this week? “Freight or Passage.” Charleston, one of the largest cities in the colonies during the era of the American Revolution, was a busy port and bustling center of commerce. ...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 13 Nov 2021

September 1

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today? “OFFICE OF INTELLIGENCE.” William Ibison offered his services as a broker to prospective clients who saw his advertisement in the September 12, 1771, edition of the Pennsylvania...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 12 Sep 2021

Happy Birthday, Mathew Carey!

Though Benjamin Franklin is often considered the patron saint of American advertising in the popular press, I believe that his efforts pale in comparison to the contributions made by Mathew Carey (1760-1839) in the final decades of the eighteenth...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 28 Jan 2021

January 11

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today? “To be Sold by Garret Noel, at New-York … and at the Printing-Office in N. London.” Timothy Green, printer of the New-London Gazette, augmented revenues by selling...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 11 Jan 2021

A Band of Alchemists

 "The Alchemist" 1558, Pieter Brugle the Elder.Mention the word 'alchemist' and the images that spring to mind are likely the same ones that have been around for centuries. Perhaps you will imagine something like Pieter Brugle’s 1558 depiction;...
From: Conciatore on 6 Jan 2021

CFP Royal Studies Network New Digital Seminar Series

The Royal Studies Network are developing a new Digital Seminar Series for members launching in January 2021. The call for proposals for seminars is now open and can be found here: royalstudiesnetwork.org/digital-seminar-series. The deadline for consideration...
From: ANZAMEMS Inc on 4 Nov 2020

Drinking the Ink of Prayer

By Genie Yoo  [1] Sometimes historians dream of moments of recognition in the manuscripts they encounter. The act of reading or reciting, writing or copying, can trigger a distant memory, allowing one to draw a line connecting two seemingly unrelated...
From: The Recipes Project on 22 Oct 2020

ACU Medieval and Early Modern Studies Seminar Series

The members of the Medieval and Early Modern Studies program at ACU are delighted to invite you to attend our next virtual seminar on August 21 at 2:00pm AEST: “Plague Time: Space, Fear and Emergency Statecraft in Early-Modern Italy”, presented...
From: ANZAMEMS Inc on 4 Aug 2020

CARMEN: The Worldwide Medieval Network – (Virtual) Annual General Meeting

The annual CARMEN open meeting brings together scholars and professionals from across the world in participatory and interactive formats: project development workshops; training and networking; the ‘Forum’ showcase for projects, institutions...
From: ANZAMEMS Inc on 21 Jul 2020

A machine that writes like Mary Dorothy George

Image: Mary Dorothy George, by Howard Coster, bromide print, © National Portrait Gallery, London, CC-BY-NC-ND 3.0 In recent years I’ve been researching histories of knowledge organisation. Although this has involved many strands of research...
From: cradledincaricature on 18 Jun 2020

Medieval and Early Modern Orients

Medieval and Early Modern Orients (MEMOs) is an AHRC-funded project that seeks to further knowledge and understanding of the early interactions between England and the Islamic worlds. Through our pages and our blog we hope to create an accessible space...
From: ANZAMEMS Inc on 17 Jun 2020

A Band of Alchemists

"The Alchemist" 1558, Pieter Brugle the Elder.Mention the word 'alchemist' and the images that spring to mind are likely the same ones that have been around for centuries. Perhaps you will imagine something like Pieter Brugle’s 1558 depiction; a...
From: Conciatore on 12 Jun 2020

Making a Medical Commonwealth

Abigail Harley and Brampton Bryan: Making a Medical Commonwealth By Emma Marshall How were illness and healthcare entangled with power in the past? Abigail Harley (c.1664-1726) of Brampton Bryan, Herefordshire, was part of a famously political family....
From: Early Modern Medicine on 10 Jun 2020

Medieval Academy of America Webinar: The Mother of All Pandemics: The State of Black Death Research in the Era of COVID-19

This coming Friday, 15 May, there will be a PUBLIC WEBINAR sponsored by the Medieval Academy of America: The Mother of All Pandemics: The State of Black Death Research in the Era of COVID-19 15 May 2020 1 – 3 PM EDT Zoom link: https://us02web.zoom.us/j/89832471831...
From: ANZAMEMS Inc on 13 May 2020

Australasian Crusades Network

The Australasian Crusades Studies Network (ACSN) is holding a Meet and Greet via Zoom on 14 May at 1pm AEST for researchers, early career academics and postgraduates who work in the field of crusades studies and are based in Australia or New Zealand....
From: ANZAMEMS Inc on 5 May 2020

Tales from the Archives: Community Conversations

The theme for this month is community, inspired by the UK university strikes in February and March.  Community is at the heart of the dispute: what do we want universities to look like? The wonderful sense of community that emerges on picket lines...
From: The Recipes Project on 10 Mar 2020

A Snapshot of the Food Studies Community

By Christian Reynolds From October to December 2019, the US-UK Food Digital Scholarship Network ran a community survey asking what (and how) food scholars are currently using analogue and digital material. We were also interested how the community thought...
From: The Recipes Project on 3 Mar 2020

January 31

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today? “For SPAIN, PORTUGAL, LONDON … The SHIP MARY.” Deciphering the copy in these advertisements may be difficult or even impossible, but the visual images remain...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 31 Jan 2020

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Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.