The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "newspapers"

Showing 1 - 20 of 163

Your search for posts with tags containing newspapers found 163 posts

July 24

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today? Newport Mercury (July 24, 1769). “This valuable tincture … sold … at Mrs. CROSSWALL’S in Thames-street[,] Newport.” In the summer of 1769, Mr. Hamilton,...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 24 Jul 2019

“The Vision” by Robin Hood (1841)

Everyone of course loves to investigate appearances of the name of Robin Hood in medieval court records. One of these days, it might finally be proven who the “real” Robin Hood was by combing through these patchy records of medieval England....

Anon. ‘Robin Hood’ (1828)

The following poem, written anonymously and titled simply as ‘Robin Hood’, appeared in The Oriental Observer and Literary Chronicle in 1828. The newspaper, printed in Calcutta during the rule of the East India Company, went through a number...

June 25

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago this week? New-Hampshire Gazette (June 25, 1769). “He hereby offers, and assures a FREE PARDON.” In late May 1769 Major General Alexander Mackay issued a pardon to “Soldiers...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 25 Jun 2019

Robin Hood the Angry Letter Writer

By Stephen Basdeo Many people have adopted the name of Robin Hood over the years. The most obvious ones which spring to mind are the men who appear in medieval court records, being criminals who adopted the alias. The press today even applies the name...

Thomas Cooper’s “Prison Rhyme” (1845)

By Stephen Basdeo I recently came into possession of a book written by Thomas Cooper (1805-92), a famous Chartist activist, which he gave to his friend, the newspaper proprietor and fellow Chartist, John Cleave (1790-1847). Chartism was the first large-scale...

May 1

GUEST CURATOR: Patrick Waters What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today? New-York Gazette and Weekly Mercury (May 1, 1769). “A compleat set of gold and silver smith’s tools.” On May 1, 1769, this advertisement...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 1 May 2019

Finding inspiration in 1920s headlines

Chicago Daily Tribune (1923-1963); Dec 5, 1929; ProQuest Historical Newspapers: Chicago Tribune pg. 16 Every writer I know is regularly asked, "Where do you get your ideas?" Some authors love this question, some hate it. For me, I'm somewhere in between.With...
From: Susanna Calkins, Author on 6 Apr 2019

“Daily Recipes for Home Cooking” (1924)

Nathan Hopson This is the second in a planned series of posts on nutrition science and government-sanctioned recipes in imperial Japan. Imagine a national cookbook. What would that look like? What would it say about the values and ideology of the society...
From: The Recipes Project on 4 Apr 2019

April 3

GUEST CURATOR: Aidan Griffin What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today? Boston Chronicle (April 3, 1769). “A GRAND CONCERT of VOCAL and INSTRUMENTAL MUSIC.” Music was popular in colonial America, just like it...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 3 Apr 2019

Putting Faces to Names: Illustrated Crime Reports in the Late Victorian Press

By Cassie Watson; posted 23 March 2019. Nothing makes for a better news story than murder, a fact that the sensationalist Victorian penny press was well placed to exploit.[1] The details of crimes, victims and killers intrigued readers, who found both...
From: Legal History Miscellany on 23 Mar 2019

The man wot drives the sovereign

A satire on the Duke’s pressure on the King to accept Emancipation. Wellington stands in profile to the right, dressed as the driver of a mail-coach, holding his whip and (as way-bill) a paper resembling the ‘Gazette’, headed ‘Bill’...
From: Recent Antiquarian Acquisitions on 22 Mar 2019

Black History is Salem History

I’m wrapping up February, a month in which educators have focused on African-American history since at least 1970, with a summary of some of the research in which I’ve been engaged and some links to some other initiatives and events in the...
From: streets of salem on 28 Feb 2019

Reports of Leslie’s Retreat

This weekend brings the third annual commemorative reenactment of “Leslie’s Retreat” to Salem, an enthusiastic event that I think everyone enjoys because of its non-commercial, non-1692 focus: at least I do! The reenactment marks an...
From: streets of salem on 22 Feb 2019

The man wot drives the sovereign

“Wellington stands in profile to the right, dressed as the driver of a mail-coach, holding his whip and (as way-bill) a paper resembling the ‘Gazette’, headed ‘Bill’ [i.e. for Catholic Relief]. His (gloved) left hand touches...
From: Recent Antiquarian Acquisitions on 20 Feb 2019

Announcing the Launch of Freedom on the Move

Freedom on the Move (FOTM), an online project devoted to fugitives from slavery in North America, launches today, February 14, 2019.
From: The Junto on 14 Feb 2019

The Politics of Victorian England’s “Vicious Republican”: G. W. M. Reynolds (1814–79)

By Stephen Basdeo It’s quite possible that you’ve never heard of George William MacArthur Reynolds (1814–79). His prolific writing career has been overshadowed somewhat by his contemporaries such as Charles Dickens, whose writings, while...

February 1

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago this week? Pennsylvania Chronicle (February 6, 1769). “The following large assortment of GOODS.” In January and February 1769, Daniel Benezet, John Benezet, and Thomas Bartow...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 12 Feb 2019

February 9

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today? “The following large assortment of GOODS.” Pennsylvania Gazette (February 9, 1768). Daniel Benezet, John Benezet, and Thomas Bartow placed an advertisement for a “large...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 9 Feb 2019

Enquiries and Enslavement

I’m in the process of teaching myself how to create digital maps with layers of history so I can visualize different times, places, events and environments. Such maps are a great teaching tool, and I also think it would be a great way...
From: streets of salem on 7 Feb 2019

Page 1 of 9123456Last »

Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.