The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "nuns"

Showing 21 - 40 of 43

Your search for posts with tags containing nuns found 43 posts

Married Priests in France, 1789-1815

By Xavier Marechaux In a previous post on this blog, Kate Marsden described the fate of hundreds of nuns who married during the French Revolution, shedding light on a topic often considered taboo.[1] However, married nuns were not the only population...
From: Age of Revolutions on 31 Jul 2017

Conference Report: Early Modern Orders and Disorders, 28th June- 30th June 2017

Last month I was lucky enough to present a paper at 'Early Modern Orders and Disorders: Religious Orders and British and Irish Catholicism'. The conference was held at the University of Notre Dame London Global Gateway, a beautiful building right in the...
From: Theosophical Transactions on 17 Jul 2017

Conference Report: Early Modern Orders and Disorders, 28th June- 30th June 2017

Last month I was lucky enough to present a paper at ‘Early Modern Orders and Disorders: Religious Orders and British and Irish Catholicism’. The conference was held at the University of Notre Dame London Global Gateway, a beautiful building...
From: Theosophical Transactions on 17 Jul 2017

Layers of reception and tiers of transmission

How do we capture evidence about the reception of women’s writing and how do we structure it for comparative purposes? In the process of data cleaning, myself and Bronagh McShane, working with original research by Emilie Murphy, have been parsing...
From: RECIRC on 26 May 2017

Three seventeenth-century books from the Galway Dominican convent library collection

The library belonging to the Dominican convent at Taylor’s Hill in Galway was recently acquired by the James Hardiman Library at NUI Galway. A substantial acquisition, consisting of over 150 books and volumes dating from the seventeenth, eighteenth,...
From: RECIRC on 4 May 2017

Making Modern Gender Roles: The Case of Married Nuns in the French Revolution

“Sexing Histories of Revolution” Roundtable – Post #2 In this series, contributors explore sex and sexual revolutions in the revolutionary era.  By Kate Marsden The French Revolution of 1789 is more often connected...
From: Age of Revolutions on 19 Apr 2017

The Galway Poor Clares

Last month, the Poor Clare community in Galway celebrated its 375th anniversary. As the longest surviving community of women religious in Ireland, the Galway Poor Clare convent holds an important position in the history of Irish monastic foundations....
From: RECIRC on 20 Feb 2017

Suppression, Migration and Exile: Towards a History of Early Modern Irish Women Religious

Integral to the Henrician religious reform programme in Ireland, as in England, was the dissolution of religious houses. In Ireland, the majority of monasteries and convents within the orbit of English government influence were suppressed during the late...
From: RECIRC on 16 Dec 2016

Conference Report: Reformation Studies Colloquium, Newcastle

The Reformation Studies Colloquium took place in Newcastle between Wednesday 14th and Friday 16th September. The event was well attended and featured speakers from a variety of countries. I was lucky enough to be able to enjoy all three days of the conference...
From: Theosophical Transactions on 18 Sep 2016

A Band of Alchemists

"The Alchemist" 1558, Pieter Brugle the Elder. (Click to enlarge.) Mention the word 'alchemist' and the images that spring to mind are likely the same ones that have been around for centuries. Perhaps you will imagine something like Pieter Brugle’s...
From: Conciatore on 14 Sep 2016

English Catholic nuns: neglected female authors and their reception and circulation

Today, in what is sadly my final blog for RECIRC (next month I will be moving to York to take up a lectureship in early modern British history) I thought I would reflect broadly on the convent archives I have had the pleasure of working through in the...
From: RECIRC on 12 Aug 2016

The Abbey of Romsey and St. Etheldreda

The BBC reports on efforts to identify whose hair was found in a coffin under Romsey Abbey in the nineteenth century. There have been theories of course:. . . about who the hair might have belonged to but nothing more than that. Frank Green, who is the...

How to wield authority in an English convent abroad

In my last blog we heard how Ursula Hewicke, a nun in the English Benedictine convent in Brussels petitioned Jacobus Boonen, the Archbishop of Mechelen for permission to learn French. She complained about the dispute between their Abbess, Mary Percy,...
From: RECIRC on 19 Apr 2016

The Nuns of St. John in England

On the blog of the Museum of the Order of St. John, Nancy Mavroudi writes about the nuns of the Order:If we were to generalise, we would probably say that Hospitaller women were primarily wealthy, noble women, from aristocratic or powerful families who,...

The Irish Dominican Convent of Nossa Senhora do Bom Sucesso, Belém, Portugal

Located on the west coast of Portugal about ten kilometres north of Lisbon city in the parish of Belém, is the Irish Dominican convent of Nossa Senhora do Bom Sucesso (Our Lady of Good Success). Founded in 1639 by the Irish Dominican Fr Dominic...
From: RECIRC on 31 Mar 2016

Seeing, touching and feeling the divine: materiality and devotion in religious cloisters

“Madonna of the Rosary” by Lorenzo Lotto (1539). Image Courtesy of Wikiemedia Commons.By Julie Hotchin and Claire Walker Monastic cloisters provide fertile ground for exploring how emotions might be learned in a religious space designed and...
From: Histories of Emotion on 17 Mar 2016

How to be understood in an English convent abroad

Since October I have been working on material held in the Archive of the Archdiocese of Mechelen (AAM) from the English Benedictine Convent of the Glorious Assumption, which was founded in Brussels in 1599 by Lady Mary Percy. In this archive are several...
From: RECIRC on 19 Feb 2016

The Queen's Six at Ascot Priory

I'm looking forward to receiving the Christmas issue of the BBC Music Magazine because it features the annual Christmas music CD. This year's is by The Queen's Six:Countertenor: Daniel Brittain, Timothy Carleston;Tenor: Nicholas Madden, Dominic Bland; Baritone/Bass:...

A Network of Alchemists

"The Alchemist" 1558, Pieter Brugle the Elder. (Click to enlarge.) Mention the word 'Alchemist' and the images that spring to mind are likely the same ones that have been around for centuries. Perhaps you will imagine something like Pieter Brugle’s...
From: Conciatore on 16 Sep 2015

A Network of Alchemists

"The Alchemist" 1558, Pieter Brugle the Elder.(Click to enlarge.)Mention the word 'Alchemist' and the images that spring to mind are likely the same ones that have been around for centuries. Perhaps you will imagine something like Pieter Brugle’s 1558...
From: Conciatore on 26 Sep 2014

Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.