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Search Results for "pain"

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Your search for posts with tags containing pain found 480 posts

Painting a Pandemic: Domenico Gargiulo’s “Plague at Naples” (1656)

Stephen Basdeo is a writer and historian based in Leeds, UK. Domenico Gargiulo, Largo Mercatello a Napoli durante la peste del 1656. Oil on canvas. Museo Nazionale di San Martino.(Public Domain Reproduction Licensed under Wikimedia Commons) It is...

18th century buttons

I’m delighted to welcome a new guest to All Things Georgian, Robin C. Larner. She is a retired attorney, legal writer, editor, and life-time member of the National Button Society. Robin offers antique buttons for sale and the end of the post is a link...
From: All Things Georgian on 19 May 2021

A Washington Peace Medal for Red Jacket

Yesterday I described the conference between leaders of the Five Nations (Haudenosaunee or Iroquois) and of the U.S. government in Philadelphia in March and April 1792.President George Washington addressed the gathering at one point, though he left the...
From: Boston 1775 on 11 May 2021

This Week on Dispatches: William V. Wenger on Foreign Assistance to the American Revolution

On this week’s Dispatches, host Brady Crytzer interviews retired US Army officer Willam V. Wenger on his research into the contributions of France, Spain,... The post This Week on Dispatches: William V. Wenger on Foreign Assistance to the American...

Mapping a polycentric Republic of Letters in eighteenth-century Mexico

Map of Mexico or New Spain (1708), by Herman Moll. (Wikimedia Commons) The viceroyalty of New Spain – whose territory largely corresponded to that of present-day Mexico – was, during the eighteenth century, the most important...
From: Voltaire Foundation on 6 May 2021

“Flaneuring” through a morning: more research joys

It has been so long since I posted here I couldn’t figure out how to do it. My last post was at the end of October of last year, so close to six months ago. It feels more like a year to me, in part because of our molassas-slow new reality. That...
From: Baroque Explorations on 27 Apr 2021

Rockingham, Washington’s Headquarters, 1783

George Washington slept here. After the commander in chief was summoned to Princeton, New Jersey during the summer of 1783, and finding no rooms... The post Rockingham, Washington’s Headquarters, 1783 appeared first on Journal of the American Revolution.

Spain 1934: Fake News and the Revolution that Never Was

By Matthew Kerry In October 1934 revolutionary militias led by socialist leaders stormed cities across Spain. The former Minister of the Interior, Rafael Salazar Alonso, was arrested on crossing the border from Portugal. Socialist revolution had triumphed...
From: Age of Revolutions on 15 Feb 2021

Impeachment II

The beginning of the second impeachment trial of President Trump in the Senate forms a remarkable new chapter in the long and fraught history of a procedure whose origins lie in Medieval England. There are several History of Parliament blogs covering...
From: History of Parliament on 9 Feb 2021

Neri's Travels

 “Roma,” Antonio Neri,from Tesoro del Mondo (Neri 1598–1600).The length and breadth of Antonio Neri's travels are far greater in thumbnail biographies and off hand remarks than can be substantiated by actual documentation. While...
From: Conciatore on 1 Feb 2021

This Week on Dispatches: George Kotlik on Texas and the American Revolution

On this week’s Dispatches, host Brady Crytzer interviews historian and JAR contributor George Kotlik on Texas’s contributions to the Patriot cause. Throughout the latter... The post This Week on Dispatches: George Kotlik on Texas and the American...

Fourteenth Colony: The Forgotten Story of the Gulf South During America’s Revolutionary Era

Fourteenth Colony: The Forgotten Story of the Gulf South During America’s Revolutionary Era by Mike Bunn. (Montgomery, AL: NewSouth Books, 2020) In Fourteenth Colony, Mike... The post Fourteenth Colony: The Forgotten Story of the Gulf South...

Ultramarine Blue

 Scrovegni  Chapel, PaduaFrescos and ultramarine ceiling, Giotto 1306.In his fifteenth century handbook for painters, Cennino Cennini said, "Ultramarine blue is a color illustrious, beautiful and most perfect, beyond all other colors; one could...
From: Conciatore on 25 Dec 2020

“They would have brought in all Guilty…”

As described yesterday, the trial of the eight enlisted men for the Boston Massacre ended with six acquittals and two convictions.The acquitted men were Cpl. William Wemys and Pvts. James Hartigan, William Macauley, Hugh White, William Warren, and John...
From: Boston 1775 on 7 Dec 2020

The Prosecution’s Closing Argument

John Adams’s closing argument in the trial of soldiers for the Boston Massacre started on 3 Dec 1770 and lasted until the next day.Then Robert Treat Paine summed up for the prosecution, concluding on the morning of 5 December, 250 years ago today....
From: Boston 1775 on 5 Dec 2020

Violence Beyond King Street on the Fifth of March

By modern standards, the judges overseeing the trial of the soldiers for the Boston Massacre should have limited the testimony to what happened in King Street or specifically involved the defendants.However, prosecutors Robert Treat Paine and Samuel Quincy...
From: Boston 1775 on 1 Dec 2020

Why Was Samuel Emmons Called to Testify?

On 28 Nov 1770, the attorneys prosecuting eight soldiers for the Boston Massacre called Samuel Emmons to the witness stand. According to defense counsel John Adams’s notes on the trial, Emmons’s testimony consisted entirely of: I dont know...
From: Boston 1775 on 29 Nov 2020

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Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.