The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "paintings"

Showing 1 - 20 of 87

Your search for posts with tags containing paintings found 87 posts

"Wolves of the Mohawk Valley" By DON TROIANI

"Wolves of the Mohawk Valley" By DON TROIANIhttp://www.dontroiani.com/commissions.shtml;
From: A Woodsrunner's Diary on 7 Sep 2019

"Respect for the Ancient Ones" By Robert Griffing.

"Respect for the Ancient Ones" By Robert Griffing.https://lordnelsons.com/;
From: A Woodsrunner's Diary on 5 Jun 2019

He Said it was General Braddock's White Horse by Robert Griffing

He Said it was General Braddock's White Horseby Robert Griffing.https://lordnelsons.com/gallery/Originals/RGGenBraddocksWhiteHorse30x40.htm;
From: A Woodsrunner's Diary on 12 Feb 2019

The bear broke loose

“A muzzled bear sits up, as if begging, on a fat woman who lies on her back. She says: “Gemini! what a Weight! my poor dear Mr Dripping was quite a Feather to him”. The bear’s keeper (right) raises his club, saying, “Down...
From: Recent Antiquarian Acquisitions on 31 Oct 2018

Bat, Cat & Mat, or, How happy could I be with either

Caricature with Queen Caroline on the arms of Bergami (left) and Alderman Wood (right), jubilant on the sidewalk before the door of “Mother Wood”. The Queen wears a watch at her waist and two miniature portraits hanging from cords from her...
From: Recent Antiquarian Acquisitions on 15 Oct 2018

A wooden substitute, or, Any port in a storm

“A companion plate to British Museum Satires no. 14103. Alderman Wood takes the Queen’s left arm, staring down at her and grinning. He wears a top-hat on the back of his head, black tail-coat with trousers; his left hand is thrust under the...
From: Recent Antiquarian Acquisitions on 9 Oct 2018

American Colonial Era Artists & Society Look At Older Women

1730-40 Artist: John Smibert 1688-1751. Subject: Sarah Middlecott 1678-1764 (Mrs. Louis Boucher). Henry Francis duPont Winterthur Museum. Mr. Louis Boucher, who had been born in France, was lost at sea in 1715. They had been married in 1702, in Boston...
From: 18th-century American Women on 11 Jul 2018

These 18th-Century Paintings of Interracial Mexican Families Are Based on a Lie.

Miguel Cabrera, De español y negra, mulata (From male Spaniard and Black Female, Mulata), c. 1763. Photo via Wikimedia Commons.https://www.artsy.net/article/artsy-editorial-18th-century-paintings-interracial-mexican-families-based-lie
From: A Woodsrunner's Diary on 28 Jun 2018

18th Century Angling. Hand lines & fishing poles.

Below: 17th & 18th century Fishing poles with fixed lines.You will note that these fixed lines were often very short, the pole being used to drop the line away from the bank.Below: Hand lines tied on bush poles 19th century.Below:18th Century hand...
From: A Woodsrunner's Diary on 12 Jan 2018

Bright angels: Shakespeare and medieval wall paintings

Fra Angelico’s 15th century Annunciation showing the Angel Gabriel appearing to Mary Angels have been part of the Christmas story ever since it was told in St Luke’s Gospel where the Angel Gabriel appeared to Mary at the Annunciation, and...
From: The Shakespeare blog on 21 Dec 2017

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This search feature has a number of purposes:

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Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.