The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "pharmacy"

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Your search for posts with tags containing pharmacy found 26 posts

Around the Table: Digital Resources

By Sarah Peters Kernan At the beginning of the COVID-19 pandemic, organizations cancelled conferences and events in staggering numbers. As it became clear that events would have to move online in order to continue, our organizations and institutions did...
From: The Recipes Project on 23 Sep 2021

Bulk Medicine and Waged Labor in Eighteenth-Century London

By Zachary Dorner In the eighteenth century, druggists, chemists, and apothecaries began producing medicines in larger quantities for sale in a variety of markets, resulting in a more coherent manufacturing sector in Britain. Making medicines at...
From: The Recipes Project on 24 Dec 2020

Revising Tillmann Taape’s Recipes against the plague – in pharmaceutical code?

Editor’s note: Today we revisit a post originally published in 2013 by Tillmann Taape on plague remedies given by the apothecary Hieronymus Brunschwig in his Liber pestilentialis (1500). The book included an interesting mix of recipes in the...
From: The Recipes Project on 14 May 2020

Basel Pharmacy Museum: An Interview

The Recipes Project heads to Basel, Switzerland, to learn about the collections of the Pharmacy Museum. Laurence Totelin spoke with Philippe Wanner,  Barbara Orland, Corinne Eichenberger and Martin Kluge. Could you give us a brief overview of your...
From: The Recipes Project on 21 Nov 2019

Variable Matters (Basel, 20-22 September 2019), organized by Barbara Orland and Stefanie Gänger

By Stefanie Gänger Hosted at Basel’s beautiful Pharmacy Museum, the conference “Variable Matters” was designed to bring together historians with an interest in the movement of medicinals and knowledge about them between and...
From: The Recipes Project on 5 Nov 2019

Opium; or, How it Became a “Dirty Drug”

By Stephen Basdeo We live in an era in which, increasingly, governments in many western countries are realising that they are losing the so-called “War on Drugs”. Some countries have completely decriminalised certain substances, while in some...

British Society for the History of Pharmacy: Byzantine Pharmacology between East and West

British Society for the History of PharmacyMaplethorpe Lecture Theatre, UCL School of Pharmacy, 29-39 Brunswick Square, London WC1N 1AX Monday 5 February 2018, 17:30Lecture by Dr Petros Bouras-Vallianatos, Wellcome Trust Research Fellow...
From: The Renaissance Diary on 5 Feb 2018

Palm Trees and Potions: On Portuguese Pharmacy Signs

By Benjamin Breen Anyone who has walked in a European city at night will be familiar with the glow of them: a vivid and snakelike green, slightly eerie when encountered on a lonely street, beautiful in the rain. They were once neon; now most are...
From: The Recipes Project on 2 Aug 2016

Translating Recipes 14: Recipes in Time and Space, Part 8 – BETWEEN 3

[This is the third of a three-part posting on BETWEEN-ness in recipes and their translation. For the first two parts, see here and here.] The following is a translation of our long-translated Manchu medical recipe in dialogue form, to explore the between-ness...
From: The Recipes Project on 7 Jan 2016

Translating Recipes 13: Recipes in Time and Space, Part 7 – BETWEEN

[This is the second of a three-part posting on BETWEEN-ness in recipes and their translation. For the first part, see here.] Happy new year, readers of the Translating Recipes series! When last we met, I was telling you about the latest exploration of...
From: The Recipes Project on 5 Jan 2016

Temporality in John Dauntesey’s Recipe book (1652-1683)

by Melissa Schultheis In May and June of this year, I had the opportunity to research recipe books and midwifery manuals at the College of Physicians of Philadelphia. One manuscript, inscribed “John Dauntesey 1652,” contains several manuscript...
From: The Recipes Project on 8 Dec 2015

Valuing “Caesar’s and Sampson’s Cures”

By Claire Gherini Between 1749 and 1754 in South Carolina, the South Carolina Colonial Assembly (the governmental body of the British colony) freed two enslaved healers, Caesar, and Sampson, in exchange for their willingness to publicize the ingredients...
From: The Recipes Project on 18 Aug 2015

Translating Recipes 12: Recipes in Time and Space, Part 6 – BETWEEN

By Carla Nappi (This is part of an ongoing series of posts exploring prepositional attitudes and their translation in recipe literature. For the previous posts, check out this link.) In the most recent posts of the “Translating Recipes”...
From: The Recipes Project on 21 May 2015

Translating Recipes 11: Recipes in Time and Space, Part 5 – …A Flowing Oil…

By Carla Nappi (This is part of an ongoing series of posts exploring prepositional attitudes and their translation in recipe literature. For the previous posts, check out this link.) In my previous post, we talked about the importance of the …...
From: The Recipes Project on 1 May 2015

Translating Recipes 10: Recipes in Time and Space, Part 4 – AFTER

By Carla Nappi (This is part of an ongoing series of posts exploring prepositional attitudes and their translation in recipe literature. For the previous posts, see here, here, and here!) Last time we met, we talked about the importance of … Continue...
From: The Recipes Project on 30 Apr 2015

The wrong trousers? Common folk in striped clothes as readers of early modern recipes.

By Tillmann Taape  When trying to make historical sense of printed medical recipe collections, one tricky but important question always recurs: who did the author and/or publisher think would be likely to read and benefit from their books? In my...
From: The Recipes Project on 28 Apr 2015

The Politics of Chocolate: Cosimo III’s Secret Jasmine Chocolate Recipe

By Ashley Buchanan By 1708 the Medici grand ducal “spezieria,” or pharmacy, had grown into a complex of eleven rooms located in the main ducal residence, the Palazzo Pitti. It included a medical laboratory for the production of alchemical medicines,...
From: The Recipes Project on 7 Apr 2015

Translating Recipes 9: Recipes in Time and Space, Part 3 – IF

By Carla Nappi (This is part of an ongoing series of posts exploring prepositional attitudes and their translation in recipe literature. For the previous posts, see here and here!) One of the most important aspects of a recipe is the … Continue...
From: The Recipes Project on 19 Feb 2015

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Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.