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Search Results for "podcast"

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Your search for posts with tags containing podcast found 130 posts

How to Read Shakespeare’s Villains: Titus Andronicus

A study of the rise and fall of Aaron, from Shakespeare's Titus Andronicus: focusing on his motives, his rhetoric, and the role of a villain in a tragedy. This episode, the second in a three-part series on Shakespeare's villains, includes readings of...
From: Michael Ullyot on 7 Oct 2020

How to Read Shakespeare’s Villains: Richard III

A study of the rise and fall of Richard of Gloucester, from Shakespeare's 3 Henry VI and Richard III: focusing on his motives, his rhetoric, and the role of a villain in a history-play. This episode, the first in a three-part series on Shakespeare's villains,...
From: Michael Ullyot on 5 Oct 2020

How to Read Shakespeare’s Villains: Richard III

A study of the rise and fall of Richard of Gloucester, from Shakespeare's 3 Henry VI and Richard III: focusing on his motives, his rhetoric, and the role of a villain in a history-play. This episode, the first in a three-part series on Shakespeare's villains,...
From: Michael Ullyot on 5 Oct 2020

How to Read Metaphysical Nature-Poems

An introduction to four metaphysical nature-poems: George Herbert’s “Life”; Henry King’s “A Contemplation upon Flowers”; and Andrew Marvell’s “Bermudas” and “The Garden.”  These poems...
From: Michael Ullyot on 4 Oct 2020

How to Read Miguel de Cervantes’ Don Quixote, Part 1

Today’s topic is the first part of the first novel ever written, Miguel de Cervantes’ Don Quixote (1605): in which a mild-mannered Spanish aristocrat, bored with his life, decides to imitate the wandering knights of medieval romance. 
From: Michael Ullyot on 4 Oct 2020

How to Read John Milton’s Paradise Lost, Books 2-3

There are three parts of this episode, which follows Episode 3 of this season: First, we’ll consider how Milton, the blind poet, deals with the difficulty of describing indescribable things;  then we’ll resume the story with the debate...
From: Michael Ullyot on 22 Sep 2020

How to Read Dante’s Inferno, Canto 5

The three parts of today’s episode surround each other like the concentric rings of hell. (Maybe not the best metaphor?) First I’ll briefly describe the story of Dante’s Inferno;  and then I’ll guide you toward the second...
From: Michael Ullyot on 22 Sep 2020

How to Read John Milton’s Paradise Lost, Book 1

The first in a projected 7-episode series on Milton's epic poem, Paradise Lost (1667, 1674).  Covering how to read Milton's language; his Christian subject and epic genre; and what happens in Book 1 of 12.
From: Michael Ullyot on 10 Sep 2020

How to Read Plato’s Phaedrus

This episode is about written language, as the Greek philosopher Plato describes it in his dialogue Phaedrus. The Latin proverb I cite is Verba volant, scripta manent; and the Greek word that means both 'cure' and 'poison' is pharmakon. The quotation...
From: Michael Ullyot on 10 Sep 2020

The What and the How

In this inaugural episode, I describe the podcast's coverage and format, and then introduce myself and my motives for hosting the series. I conclude: "Think of the episodes in this series as a set of exploratory essays, of varying lengths, gathering evidence...
From: Michael Ullyot on 10 Sep 2020

How the Black Death reshaped Medieval England

Jane Whittle was approached by History Extra to take part in a podcast after the publication of her article by The Many-headed Monster You can listen to it on History Extra -The Black Death and social change and find further details with links to more...
From: Forms of Labour on 22 Apr 2020

Great Lives, the perfect pandemic podcast

Donald Wright When we received instructions to distance and isolate, I called my 92-year old mother who lives alone in another province. She seemed to be taking the pandemic in stride. “I survived the Depression, the war, and the energy crisis,”...
From: Borealia on 13 Apr 2020

Podcast Episode 28: Merging Royal Vintage & American Duchess

Yay! Welcome back to a whole new season of podcastery! It's been awhile since we've done podcasts, but we get a lot of requests for them, so we thought we'd kick off this new season with some *business chat* - Royal Vintage merging with American Duchess...

A County in Crisis, 169

The twitter tagline for Hub History’s podcast on the Boston witch trials in the mid-seventeenth century was a bit on the edge for me: The Salem Witch Trials? So mainstream. Boston was hanging women for imaginary crimes BEFORE it was cool. Yet...
From: streets of salem on 7 Oct 2019

Around the Table: Media Spotlight

This month on Around the Table, I am chatting with Laura Carlson, producer and host of the podcast The Feast. In other posts this month, we’ll read about many different experiences and methods for teaching with recipes. Here, Laura will tell us...
From: The Recipes Project on 5 Sep 2019

This Week on Dispatches: Richard Werther and Lambert Wickes, Continental Navy Captain

In this week’s Dispatches host Brady Crytzer and JAR contributor Richard J. Werther discuss the life of Captain Lambert Wickes, the differences between “piracy” and... The post This Week on Dispatches: Richard Werther and Lambert...

Dispatches: The Podcast of the Journal of the American Revolution

We are pleased to announce that the Journal of the American Revolution has launched a new podcast, Dispatches. Each week Dispatches will feature interviews with contributors... The post Dispatches: The Podcast of the Journal of the American...

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Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.