The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "poison"

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Your search for posts with tags containing poison found 61 posts

M.P. Shiel’s “The Purple Cloud” (1901)

By Stephen Basdeo The book was a legend … out of space, out of time … he had the character of a poet and a prophet — a prophet, I mean, in the Old Testament sense.[1] Those words above were used by the poet Edward Shanks (1892–1953)...

Witches Brew of Glass

 Glass pumpkin evocative of chalcedony glassCourtesy of  Smithsonian Museum store.In honor of Halloween, we will take a detailed look at chalcedony glass; this is one of, if not the most colorful types of glass ever made. In the seventeenth...
From: Conciatore on 30 Oct 2020

Chalcedony Glass

17th century ribbed bottle,Brescia, Italy.In hopeful anticipation of flowers, the cusp of spring seems the appropriate time to celebrate Antonio Neri's most colorful creation; chalcedony glass.[1] Through his clever technique, the 17th century glassmaker...
From: Conciatore on 1 Apr 2020

Animal Victims of Crime

By Cassie Watson and Laura Sellers; posted 27 March 2020. In our previous work on the Leeds–based forensic expert Dr Thomas Scattergood, we noted that he performed toxicological analyses on more animal than human victims, including horses, cattle,...
From: Legal History Miscellany on 27 Mar 2020

Bianca Capello and Francesco de Medici

19th century romantic depiction ofBianca Cappello, Francesco de' Medici (with Don Antoni as a child.)The story of 17th century glassmaker Antonio Neri weaves together closely with that of a Medici prince also named Antonio. The prince was six...
From: Conciatore on 25 Mar 2020

Chalcedony Glass

17th century ribbed bottle,Brescia, Italy.In hopeful anticipation of flowers, the cusp of spring seems the appropriate time to celebrate Antonio Neri's most colorful creation; chalcedony glass.[1] Through his clever technique, the 17th century glassmaker...
From: Conciatore on 30 Dec 2019

Lies, Damned Lies, and Statistics

By Cassie Watson; posted 11 December 2019. As the current election campaign draws to a close amid increasingly shrill claims and counterclaims, I am reminded of a saying that, while common today, appears to have originated around the time of a much earlier...
From: Legal History Miscellany on 11 Dec 2019

Witch's Brew of Glass

Glass pumpkin evocative of chalcedony glassCourtesy of  Smithsonian Museum store.In honor of Halloween, we will take a detailed look at chalcedony glass; this is one of, if not the most colorful types of glass ever made. In the seventeenth century,...
From: Conciatore on 30 Oct 2019

Jane Scott, The Preston Poisoner

On the bitterly cold morning of Saturday 22nd March 1828, a twenty two year old woman sat in her prison cell at Lancaster Castle, awaiting the hangman’s noose, with just the long standing prison chaplain, Reverend Mr Joseph Rowley to comfort her...
From: All Things Georgian on 17 Oct 2019

Very Serious Pecuniary Loss and Inconvenience: A Jury’s Plea

By Cassie Watson; posted 22 September 2019. The trial of the notorious Rugeley Poisoner, William Palmer, opened at London’s Central Criminal Court, the Old Bailey, on Wednesday 14 May 1856. When it concluded two weeks later the formidable prosecution...
From: Legal History Miscellany on 22 Sep 2019

The Regency poisoning of Mary Biggadike

Mary Biggadike was born May 1801 and baptised in the parish church, of Whaplode, a village in Lincolnshire, by the somewhat forthright vicar, Samuel Oliver. In early 1818 she found herself pregnant and so, doing the right thing, James Cawthorn, a labourer...
From: All Things Georgian on 19 Sep 2019

The Long Arm of the Law Cut Short

By Cassie Watson; posted 31 July 2019. On an April evening in 1820, within clear view of her mother-in-law, a young woman dosed her husband’s gruel with a substance that immediately caused pain, vomiting, tremors and extreme weakness. While those...
From: Legal History Miscellany on 31 Jul 2019

Roundtable Conclusion: Food and Hunger in Vast Early America

Today at The Junto, Rachel Herrmann concludes our food roundtable with some questions for the field of early American food history
From: The Junto on 21 Jun 2019

Deadly Fumes

Memento mori, 1605.Nikolaus Alexander  Mair von Landshut.17th century glassmaker and alchemist Antonio Neri handled very dangerous materials on a daily basis. He used strong acids, which if splattered could easily burn flesh, or cause blindness....
From: Conciatore on 22 May 2019

Chalcedony Glass

17th century ribbed bottle,Brescia, Italy.In hopeful anticipation of flowers, the cusp of spring seems the appropriate time to celebrate Antonio Neri's most colorful creation; chalcedony glass.[1] Through his clever technique, the 17th century glassmaker...
From: Conciatore on 1 Apr 2019

Deadly Fumes

Memento mori, 1605.Nikolaus Alexander  Mair von Landshut.17th century glassmaker and alchemist Antonio Neri handled very dangerous materials on a daily basis. He used strong acids, which if splattered could easily burn flesh, or cause blindness....
From: Conciatore on 27 Jul 2018

Chalcedony Glass

17th century ribbed bottle,Brescia, Italy.In hopeful anticipation of colorful flowers, the cusp of spring, seems the appropriate time to celebrate Antonio Neri's most colorful creation; chalcedony glass.[1] Through his clever technique, Neri managed...
From: Conciatore on 21 Mar 2018

The killer socks of 1868.

In the mid nineteenth century, a spate of poisonings began to raise alarm in the newspapers. Almost anybody was at risk, and the culprit was, as yet, unclear. But the source of the poison was no Victorian arch criminal; it was a far subtler, domestic...
From: DrAlun on 11 Jan 2018

Pain, poison, and surgery in fourteenth-century China

Yi-Li Wu It’s hard to set a compound fracture when the patient is in so much pain that he won’t let you touch him. For such situations, the Chinese doctor Wei Yilin (1277-1347) recommended giving the patient a dose of “numbing medicine”...
From: The Recipes Project on 26 Sep 2017

Deadly Fumes

Memento mori, 1605.Nikolaus Alexander  Mair von Landshut. 17th century glassmaker and alchemist Antonio Neri handled very dangerous materials on a daily basis. He used strong acids, which if splattered could easily burn flesh, or cause blindness....
From: Conciatore on 1 Sep 2017

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Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.