The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "political organizing"

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Your search for posts with tags containing political organizing found 407 posts

“Mentor” Remembers the Massacre

Before February ends, I need to note one event from this month 250 years ago.On 11 Feb 1771, the Fleet brothers’ Boston Evening-Post ran as its first front-page item a letter signed “Mentor.” It recalled the previous year’s Boston...
From: Boston 1775 on 22 Feb 2021

“One idea shared by just about every author of the Constitution”

From David Frum’s essay “The Founders Were Wrong about Democracy” in The Atlantic Monthly: If there was one idea shared by just about every author of the Constitution, it was the one articulated by James Madison at the convention on...
From: Boston 1775 on 17 Feb 2021

Four Representative Men

I’ve been analyzing a letter about cannon sent to the Massachusetts Provincial Congress’s committee of safety in February 1775.This posting looks at the four men who signed that letter, in order of their signatures. James Barrett (1710-1779)...
From: Boston 1775 on 12 Feb 2021

Losing Sight of William Molineux—Live Chat

From the Transactions of the Colonial Society of Massachusetts: A Stated Meeting of the Society was held at the house of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, No. 28 Newbury Street, Boston, on Thursday, January 28, 1926, at three o’clock in...
From: Boston 1775 on 9 Feb 2021

“Contested Elections” and “Difficult Transitions”

Back on 6 January, both the Massachusetts Historical Society and Revolutionary Spaces had online panel discussions planned about the past examples of difficult Presidential transitions in American history.That was a timely topic, but no one realized how...
From: Boston 1775 on 23 Jan 2021

“None of this justified minority rule”

Back in early November, The Atlantic Monthly published an essay by Claremont McKenna College professor George Thomas titled “‘America Is a Republic, Not a Democracy’ Is a Dangerous—And Wrong—Argument.” Thomas wrote:...
From: Boston 1775 on 7 Jan 2021

Zabin via the Gilder Lehrman Institute, 3 Jan.

On Sunday, 3 January, the Gilder Lehrman Institute will host Serena Zabin discussing and answering questions about the Boston Massacre in its online Book Breaks series. Zabin, who hails from Lexington and is now a professor at Carleton College, will speak...
From: Boston 1775 on 2 Jan 2021

“A determination to discourage a faithful Servant of the Crown”

For acting governor Thomas Hutchinson, the dispute between his Council and the provincial secretary Andrew Oliver was yet one more headache in 1770. On 28 September, Hutchinson told the departed but still official governor, Sir Francis Bernard: “[Royall]...
From: Boston 1775 on 31 Dec 2020

Some Say the Tea Will End in Fire

Today’s the 247th anniversary of the Boston Tea Party, which is impressive, though not quite at Sestercentennial level.Earlier this month a student working on a History Day project asked me why the Sons of Liberty tossed the East India Company tea...
From: Boston 1775 on 16 Dec 2020

A New Government in Britain in 177

As the year draws to a close, I’m looking back on some of the notable events of 1770 that I didn’t discuss on their Sestercentennial anniversaries. In January 1770, the Duke of Grafton’s government collapsed in London. The duke had become...
From: Boston 1775 on 17 Nov 2020

“I would hope that you are the Sons of Liberty from principle”

I want to highlight the web version of Jordan E. Taylor’s Early American Studies article “Enquire of the Printer: The Slave Trade and Early American Newspaper Advertising.”Produced using ArcGIS’s Storymaps platform, the article...
From: Boston 1775 on 8 Nov 2020

A London View of the Electoral College Controversy

At the London School of Economics blog, Kyle Scott reviewed Prof. Alexander Keyssar’s new book, Why Do We Still Have the Electoral College?Dr. Scott wrote: Throughout the book, Keyssar draws upon congressional testimony, third party research and...
From: Boston 1775 on 7 Nov 2020

“The People and the Electoral College” Conversation, 9 Nov.

As we await the official results of the U.S. Presidential election, I can’t help but note that a system based on the popular vote would not only have provided a clear answer by now, but would also have ensured that the newly elected President and...
From: Boston 1775 on 6 Nov 2020

“Finding a Voice without the Vote” Panel, 29 Oct.

On Thursday, 29 October, I’ll be part of an online panel discussion on “Finding a Voice without the Vote: 18th Century,” presented by Revolutionary Spaces, custodian of the Old South Meeting House and Old State House in Boston.“In...
From: Boston 1775 on 27 Oct 2020

The Career of Dr. Bela Lincoln

When Bela Lincoln was growing up in Hingham in the 1740s, his father—a wealthy farmer, town official, and militia colonel—insisted on sending him to Harvard College.Some people didn’t think Bela had the smarts for it. Others felt that...
From: Boston 1775 on 24 Oct 2020

“The Solicitation and Expectation of such Reward”

I left William Story on his way to London in late 1771 bearing letters of reference from three major political players in Boston—from royal governor Thomas Hutchinson, speaker of the house Thomas Cushing, and house clerk Samuel Adams.Hutchinson...
From: Boston 1775 on 10 Oct 2020

“Considering the Non-importation Agreement to be broke”

By this week in October 1770, 250 years ago, the Boston Whigs knew that the North American non-importation movement had collapsed. As I discussed back here, early that month the Boston Gazette printed a letter from Philadelphia reporting that some of...
From: Boston 1775 on 8 Oct 2020

Arthur Lee “in the light of a rival”

Yesterday I quoted two letters from Samuel Adams in 1771, the first recommending William Story to a lobbyist in London and the second warning the same man that Story might be conspiring with Gov. Thomas Hutchinson.One might think that on receiving those...
From: Boston 1775 on 4 Oct 2020

“This political theater stokes culture wars”

Today I’m sharing statements from the country’s two largest groups of professional historians on the misuse of American history in the current Presidential campaign. From the American Historical Association:This hastily assembled “White...
From: Boston 1775 on 30 Sep 2020

Three Online Events on Revolutionary History Tonight

September usually brings a burst of historical events as the academic calendar restarts while museums and tourist sites keep appealing to visitors. This year the pandemic means that a lot of those events are being organized online, and are thus available...
From: Boston 1775 on 22 Sep 2020

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Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.