The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "politiques & politicos"

Your search for posts with tags containing politiques & politicos found 16 posts

Fake news: a very (early) modern problem

Fake news and misinformation have hit the headlines recently as concerns grow about its extent and impact. In this guest post, Dr Francis Young examines the parallels between contemporary digital fake news and English civil war newsbooks. Dr Young is...
From: the many-headed monster on 5 Dec 2016

West Country Rebels

Mark Hailwood A patchwork of conversations, thoughts and observations on the rebellious history of the South West of England, stitched together by a Somerset-born honorary-Devonian…. It’s a small world. On a recent archival trip to the Hampshire...
From: the many-headed monster on 26 Oct 2015

A revolution, an economic crisis and a very sarcastic clergyman

Brodie Waddell Thomas Smith was not a man of the people. Although born to a London merchant, he made his name teaching Hebrew at Oxford, publishing a thesis on Aramaic in the Old Testament and spending several years in Constantinople hunting down Greek...
From: the many-headed monster on 20 Apr 2015

Aspiring to a New Jerusalem: how to reform a society, Part II

Laura Sangha Once you start looking, it is surprising how many politicians, poets and pioneers have found the answer to the question ‘what kind of society do you want?’ in Scripture, taking as their model the New Jerusalem described by John...
From: the many-headed monster on 20 Mar 2015

Aspiring to a New Jerusalem: how to reform a society, Part I

Laura Sangha James II: funny, entertaining, shocking Since September last year, I have spent four hours a week discussing, with sixteen University of Exeter students, what it meant to be a Protestant in England from the Reformation right through to the...
From: the many-headed monster on 16 Mar 2015

We the People, 1535-1787: Who were ‘the people’ in early modern England? Part III

Brodie Waddell In 1787, a rag-tag band of rebels and revolutionaries gathered in Philadelphia to write a constitution. They decided to begin the document with a phrase that has since become rather famous: ‘We the People of the United States’. About...
From: the many-headed monster on 9 Mar 2015

Who were ‘the people’ in early modern England? Part II: Some evidence from manuscripts

Brodie Waddell According to a crude survey of published texts, ‘the people’ were invoked frequently in print in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries, especially in times of political turmoil such as the 1640s and 1688-89. However, published texts...
From: the many-headed monster on 2 Mar 2015

Gunpowder, Treason and Plot III: Places and Practice

Laura Sangha This is the third of three posts surveying the London Catholic community at the time of the Gunpowder Plot. View the first here and the second here. Yesterday we discovered that records of fluctuating levels of persecution might in fact provide...
From: the many-headed monster on 5 Nov 2014

Gunpowder, Treason and Plot II: The People

Laura Sangha This is the second of three posts surveying the London Catholic community around the time of the Gunpowder Plot. View the first here. Recusant roll entries can give details about social status. Having established that there were lots of missionary...
From: the many-headed monster on 4 Nov 2014

Gunpowder, Treason and Plot I: The London Mission

Laura Sangha Allegedly Guy Fawkes’ lantern, now in the Ashmolean Museum On 4 November 1605, during a search at around midnight on the eve of the state opening of England’s Parliament, a soldier by the name of Guy Fawkes was accosted by officials...
From: the many-headed monster on 3 Nov 2014

The Woolcomber’s World, Part IV: Births, deaths, marriages and fighting cocks

Brodie Waddell On 22 March 1697, ‘there were a great many fighting Cocks carried through Coxall on horsback in linen baggs’. So wrote Joseph Bufton in one of his eleven surviving notebooks. Watching two birds tear each other apart: not as much fun...
From: the many-headed monster on 28 Oct 2014

The political economy of racism: the Evil May Day riots of 1517 and the rise of UKIP

Brodie Waddell The UK Independence Party is doing extremely well in the local and European elections held across England yesterday. It is, to put it mildly, an unpleasant sort of political party. It has more than its fair share of bigots and homophobes....
From: the many-headed monster on 23 May 2014

Early modern history after Hobsbawm

Brodie Waddell Eric Hobsbawm was not an early modernist. Although he wandered into the seventeenth century every once and awhile, his scholarship was focused on the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Yet it would be unjust to dismiss him as irrelevant....
From: the many-headed monster on 15 May 2014

Samantha Shave, ‘History for below’

[This is the ninth piece in ‘The Future of History from Below’ online symposium (#historyfrombelow). Samantha Shave is a research associate at the University of Cambridge, working on the project 'Inheritance, Families and the Market in Nineteenth...
From: the many-headed monster on 26 Jul 2013

Simon Sandall, ‘History lessons from below?’

[This is the eighth piece in ‘The Future of History from Below’ online symposium (#historyfrombelow). Simon Sandall is a lecturer at the University of Winchester whose recent publications focus on custom, law, community and popular politics and popular...
From: the many-headed monster on 24 Jul 2013

David Hitchcock, ‘Why history from below matters more than ever’

[This is the seventh piece in ‘The Future of History from Below’ online symposium (#historyfrombelow). David Hitchcock is an IAS Early Career Fellow at the University of Warwick and will be taking up a post at Canterbury Christ Church University in...
From: the many-headed monster on 22 Jul 2013

Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.