The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "population"

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Your search for posts with tags containing population found 33 posts

Hardesty on New England Slavery in Medford, 17 Oct.

On Thursday, 17 October, Jared Hardesty will speak at the Royall House and Slave Quarters in Medford on his new book, Black Lives, Native Lands, White Worlds: A History of Slavery in New England. The site describes the book this way:Shortly after the...
From: Boston 1775 on 16 Oct 2019

The Atlas of Boston History is a big book. I just got my copy, and it’s 14 inches tall and 11 inches...

The Atlas of Boston History is a big book. I just got my copy, and it’s 14 inches tall and 11 inches wide, 224 full-color pages of maps, charts, and other illustrations of Boston history.I got a copy because I worked with editor Nancy S. Seasholes...
From: Boston 1775 on 4 Oct 2019

“An especially clever piece” in Children of Colonial America

While preparing for a teachers’ workshop next week, I came across for the first time Judith Ridner’s review of Children in Colonial America, a volume edited by James Marten and Philip J. Greven, for the journal Pennsylvania History.You’ll...
From: Boston 1775 on 10 Aug 2019

The Natick Community and the Watertown Dam

Last month the Junto blog shared an interesting essay by Zachary M. Bennett, “Damming Fish and Indians: Starvation and Dispossession in Colonial Massachusetts.”Bennett writes:Compared to other Native Americans in southern New England, the...
From: Boston 1775 on 6 Jul 2019

Serfin’ U.S.A. with Benjamin Franklin

Yesterday I examined the facts and logic of a recent USA Today opinion essay, “Killing the Electoral College Means Rural Americans Would Be Serfs” by Trent England. I found them unconvincing.The portions of the essay that invoke history are...
From: Boston 1775 on 27 May 2019

Sufferers from the Great Boston Fire of 176

The scope of the Boston fire of 20 Mar 1760 really comes out in the list of victims that the newspapers published in the following week. The list was actually a guess, based on November 1759 property assessment records. The printers acknowledged that...
From: Boston 1775 on 19 Jan 2019

“Landed and quartered in town”

On 18 Nov 1768, 250 years ago today, the Boston Whigs’ “Journal of Occurrences” alerted their readers in other North American ports to this news:The 64th Regiment of those troops Col. [John] Pomeroy, are landed and quartered in town,...
From: Boston 1775 on 18 Nov 2018

Halifax Reacts to the Occupation of Boston

In 1768 the royal governor of Nova Scotia, which included modern-day New Brunswick, was Lord William Campbell, shown here. According to Emily P. Weaver’s 1904 paper “Nova Scotia and New England During the Revolution,” as of 1766 the...
From: Boston 1775 on 13 Oct 2018

“Evidence that his country was once as ours is”

In 1838 a contributor to the Southern Literary Messenger who signed himself (or, less likely, herself) “J.A.” set out to fill column inches by describing two “Relics of the Olden Time,” as the headline had it. Both were in the...
From: Boston 1775 on 23 Jul 2018

“The Road to Concord” Runs through Lancaster, 6 Feb.

Soon after the “Powder Alarm” of 2 September 1774, Massachusetts towns began to look into their military resources. Among those towns was Lancaster, in the center of the province. It might seem surprising that a farm town of only 328 families...
From: Boston 1775 on 31 Jan 2017

Statistics, Power, and Expertise

When we think of knowledge in the context of government, we often think of statistics. In fact, it’s arguable that statistics are not merely an especially prominent form of politically useful knowledge, but that their increasing use, starting in...
From: memorious on 26 Jan 2017

Looking at Brooklyn Then and Now

While speaking in Morristown last week, I had the pleasure of meeting Jason R. Wickersty, a National Park Service ranger.He just wrote an article about the Battle of Brooklyn for the latest issue of Hallowed Ground, the magazine of the Civil War Trust:...
From: Boston 1775 on 18 Oct 2016

A Look at Boston’s Lost and Found

Last month at the African American Intellectual History blog, Jared Hardesty wrote about a surviving scrap of colonial Boston town records and what they reveal about the town’s black population.The story starts in the Boston Public Library’s...
From: Boston 1775 on 30 Sep 2016

The Issue of Immigration—Running the Numbers

Yesterday I quoted from the Course of Human Events blog’s posting about The Heart of the Declaration: The Founders’ Case for an Activist Government, a new analysis of the forces behind the Revolution by Yale history professor Steven Pincus.Specifically,...
From: Boston 1775 on 27 Sep 2016

What does EEBO represent? Part II: Corpus linguistics and representativeness

What exactly does EEBO represent? Is it representative? Often, the question of whether a corpus or data set is representative is answered first by describing what the corpus does and does not contain. What does EEBO contain? As Iona Hine
From: Linguistic DNA on 7 Sep 2016

Investigating the Meaning of the Gadsden Flag

A government agency’s report from a couple of months ago is just now being spread around the web, thanks to law professor Eugene Volokh’s column about it in the Washington Post. The Volokh article is headlined “Wearing ‘Don’t...
From: Boston 1775 on 9 Aug 2016

Self-promotion/free advice alert

Buy this book! Well, buy it if you have US$100/£65/C$115 that’s not destined for more pressing uses, like rent or food. Otherwise, look for it in a generously endowed academic library near you. It’s full of new and interesting thoughts...
From: memorious on 10 Jun 2016

The Ambivalent Alchemist’s Guide to History: Or, Why Gabriel Plattes Matters

“But if you look at the history, modern chemistry only starts coming in to replace alchemy around the same time capitalism really gets going. Strange, eh? What do you make of that?” Webb nodded agreeably. “Maybe capitalism decided it...
From: memorious on 8 Jun 2016

The Great Alchemist Bragadini

Like magic, astrology, and other endeavours now found in the “occult” section (it’s in the back, just follow the patchouli scent), alchemy can be hard for non-occultists to take seriously. On the other hand, early...
From: memorious on 19 May 2016

Return to Penis Island: Or, the surprising trajectories of early modern population thought (Part 3: Conclusion)

As we’ve seen, there were a variety of lenses through which to read Neville’s novel, from travel account to political parable to biblical allegory to niche pornography. The Isle of Pines’s close attention to population registered differently...
From: memorious on 26 Apr 2016

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Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.