The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "portraiture"

Your search for posts with tags containing portraiture found 15 posts

Katherine Howard or Anne of Cleves?

Above: Portrait of a Lady, perhaps Katherine Howard; Royal Collection TrustA portrait miniature in the Royal Collection Trust, dating to circa 1540, has for some time been identified as a likeness of Katherine Howard, fifth queen consort of Henry VIII,...
From: Conor Byrne on 24 Sep 2021

Homework for Table Talks II

Texts and Rationales for Table Talks II: New Approaches to Romantic Studies and Society The first Table Talks event went with a bang before Christmas. You can still check out the recording here. Our next event in June promises to be just as exciting...
From: The Romantic Ridiculous on 31 Mar 2021

Did Birmingham artist Samuel Lines know murdered Mary Ashford?

Early in the morning of Tuesday 27 May 1817, a labourer came across a pair of boots, a bonnet and bundle of clothes near a stagnant pit of water just north of the village of Erdington near Birmingham. He surmised that someone had gone into the pit and...
From: Naomi Clifford on 30 Mar 2020

History Today review: Nicholas Hilliard: Life of an Artist by Elizabeth Goldring

It is July 1571, and Elizabeth I is sitting for a portrait in “the open ally of a goodly garden”, almost certainly at Hampton Court. The portrait is “in little” – what we would now call a watercolour miniature, although the...
From: Mathew Lyons on 6 Aug 2019

Framing Slavery in Eighteenth-Century French Portraiture at the Château des Ducs de Bretagne

By Nathan H. Dize In May 2015, the Musée de l’Histoire de Nantes welcomed two of their most influential citizens of the eighteenth century to their permanent collection. The museum, housed in the Château des Ducs de Bretagne,...
From: Age of Revolutions on 29 May 2017

Guest Post: Janine Yorimoto Boldt, “Looking at Early American (Art) History”

Guest poster Janine Yorimoto Boldt on the relationship between early American history and early American art history.
From: The Junto on 23 Jan 2017

Anne Boleyn's Hair Colour in Portraiture

Mystery surrounds Anne Boleyn's appearance. Contemporaries were ambiguous in their descriptions of the appearance of Henry VIII's second queen: either she was a slim and very beautiful, small-breasted Venus, or a grotesque, deformed creature who had lured...
From: Conor Byrne on 2 Sep 2016

CALL FOR PAPERS: “New Scholarship in British Art History: Discoveries at the NCMA”

A two-day symposium held at the North Carolina Museum of Art hosted alongside the upcoming exhibition “History and Mystery: Discoveries in the NCMA British Collection.” Date: Friday, January 27th & Saturday, January 28th, 2017.The...
From: The Renaissance Diary on 25 Jul 2016

George Jamesone: The ‘Scottish Van Dyck’ – Guest Post by Alison Lodge

Good day to you! Today we have Art Historian Alison Lodge as our guest writer on The Seventeenth Century Lady! I’ve known Alison for several years now on Twitter, where she mainly tweets about 18th-century topics. Today, however, she’s...
From: The Seventeenth Century Lady on 17 Apr 2015

Rehabilitating Marie-Antoinette’s favourite: the princesse de Lamballe

Open any book on the reign of Louis XVI and Marie-Antoinette or the French Revolution and the reader will invariably find one or two sentences recounting the grisly manner of the princesse de Lamballe’s death during the September massacres. Print by...
From: Voltaire Foundation on 27 Feb 2015

Intern Diaries: Cult and Coronation

‘Heaven, from thy endless goodness, send prosperous life, long, and ever happy, to the high and mighty princess of England, Elizabeth!’ Henry VIII, Act V, Scene V Depiction of Elizabeth I, from an illuminated Royal Charter, about 1572 This week marks...
From: Finding Shakespeare on 16 Jan 2015

Mary Davis, the horned woman

By Felicity Roberts At the British Museum, near the centre of the Enlightenment Gallery in wall press 156, there is a portrait in oils of a woman with what appear to be horn-like growths coming from the side of her head.  The woman has an arresting,...
From: The Sloane Letters Blog on 2 Dec 2013

Academic Culture & Competition in Early Modern Europe

This year's Early Modern Research Centre colloquium at the University of Reading is on the culture of competition in Europe's Academies. I will be giving a paper on the culture of institutional competition that drove artistic production in 17th-century...
From: Atelier on 27 Mar 2013

Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.