The Early Modern Commons

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Your search for posts with tags containing pretty pictures found 35 posts

A Wandering Story of the Wandering Jew

Laura Sangha Part I   Gustave Dore, The Legend of the Wandering Jew: A Series of 12 Designs, c. 1857, V&A Collections. Story 1 A month or so ago I read Sarah Perry’s wonderful third novel Melmoth. Central to the book is the myth of Melmotka,...
From: the many-headed monster on 1 Apr 2020

Images of Alice Clark

As an ‘extra’ to our ongoing #AliceClark100 Online Reading Group – which will resume shortly with a post on Chapter II: ‘Capitalists’, so get reading – Tim Stretton has sourced some images of Alice from the Clark family...
From: the many-headed monster on 9 May 2019

Protestants and Images in the Late-Seventeenth-Century

This post in our After Iconophobia Online Symposium comes from Laura Sangha, fellow monster-head and Lecturer in the Department of History at the University of Exeter.  Laura’s first monograph was on Angels and Belief in England 1480-1700,...
From: the many-headed monster on 27 Mar 2017

Introductory thoughts

This introductory post to our After Iconophobia Online Symposium comes from Tara Hamling, Senior Lecturer in Early Modern History in the Department of History at the University of Birmingham.  Tara is an Art Historian by training and has published...
From: the many-headed monster on 22 Mar 2017

After Iconophobia?

After Iconophobia? An Online Symposium Tara Hamling and Jonathan Willis In 1985, Patrick Collinson delivered Reading University’s Stenton lecture on the topic ‘From Iconoclasm to Iconophobia: the Cultural Impact of the Second English Reformation.’...
From: the many-headed monster on 20 Mar 2017

what those libraries were in The Toast

I thoroughly enjoyed “How To Decorate Your Dream Library” by Amy Collier for The Toast. But because I am me, I was made insane by the lack of captions identifying any of the libraries pictured, so I went ahead and worked my way through...
From: Wynken de Worde on 5 Jan 2016

looking aslant

the verso of John Starkey’s bookseller’s advertisement in the back of John Dancer’s translation of Tasso’s Aminta (London, 1660; Folger Shakespeare Library, T172) I have a lot of pictures of this book. I’ll write something...
From: Wynken de Worde on 9 Sep 2015

Memorial and History: appendix ii, further discoveries

Laura Sangha Last year I wrote a series of posts on memorialisation and history, inspired by my discovery of Exeter’s memorial to two sixteenth-century martyrs. I uncovered the story of the two local victims remembered on the monument, the life of its...
From: the many-headed monster on 1 Feb 2015

Imagining early modern working women, or, economic history’s image problem

Brodie Waddell In 1658, the Czech scholar John Amos Comenius published what’s been called ‘the first children’s picture book’. It proved extremely popular and was republished many times, in many different languages. What brought it to my attention...
From: the many-headed monster on 26 Jan 2015

The Woolcomber’s World, Part III: Rich clothiers, poor combers and the obscurity of early modern occupations

Brodie Waddell Whether you’re a historian, a hairdresser or a helicopter pilot, you may well define yourself by your occupation. The same was true in the early modern period, as when legal scribes added ‘labourer’, ‘weaver’ or ‘yeoman’ after...
From: the many-headed monster on 6 Oct 2014

Fantastic Thoresby – Part IV: An archive closure, a whale and a funny friend

Laura Sangha This is my latest post in my long running series on the pious Leeds antiquarian Ralph Thoresby. My thanks to the Yorkshire Archeological Society for their permission to reproduce material from the Thoresby papers. I recently returned from...
From: the many-headed monster on 8 Sep 2014

Memorial and history, Part 4: in which several fights break out and a man is murdered in the Solomon Islands

Laura Sangha This is the fourth post in a series of posts relating to Exeter’s martyrs memorial, the others are on the following: The story of the two martyrs commemorated on the memorial, Thomas Benet and Agnes Prest. Our main source of information...
From: the many-headed monster on 5 Jun 2014

Memorial and history, Part 2: in which John Foxe reveals his sources

Laura Sangha This is the second of a series of posts on issues relating to Exeter’s martyr memorial. The first post discusses the details of the martyrs themselves. Foxe’s [?] monumental [?] achievement.The information about Exeter’s...
From: the many-headed monster on 3 Jun 2014

Memorial and history, Part I: in which two people meet a terrible end

Laura Sangha A recent trip to the pub took me into a new part of Exeter, and on my way there I stumbled across a fascinating snapshot of its history. At the corner of Barnfield and Denmark roads I came to a memorial in the form of an obelisk of Dartmoor...
From: the many-headed monster on 2 Jun 2014

Living Broadside Ballads: An Immersive Conference Experience

Mark Hailwood As many readers of the ‘monster will know, April is one of the academic year’s prime conference seasons – and this year I threw myself into it with gusto, delivering three different papers on two continents in the space of...
From: the many-headed monster on 26 Apr 2014

it’s history, not a viral feed

For months now I’ve been stewing about how much I hate @HistoryInPics and their ilk (@HistoryInPix, @HistoricalPics, @History_Pics, etc.)—twitter streams that do nothing more than post “old” pictures and little tidbits of captions...
From: Wynken de Worde on 26 Jan 2014

The Tudor South West at Exeter’s Royal Albert Memorial Museum: Part 5 – Parting thoughts

Laura Sangha This is the fifth post in a week long series about an exhibition at Exeter’s museum. Day one: a map of Exeter Day two: domestic decoration Day three: goldsmiths and urban redevelopment Day four: the Spanish Armadas In this final post...
From: the many-headed monster on 20 Dec 2013

The Tudor South West at Exeter’s Royal Albert Memorial Museum: Part 4 – The Spanish Armadas

Laura Sangha This is the fourth post in a week long series about an exhibition at Exeter’s museum. Click on pictures for enlargements. Day one: a map of Exeter Day two: domestic decoration Day three: goldsmiths and urban redevelopment Pendennis...
From: the many-headed monster on 19 Dec 2013

The Tudor South West at Exeter’s Royal Albert Memorial Museum: Part 3 – Goldsmiths and urban redevelopment

Laura Sangha This is the third post in a week long series about an exhibition at Exeter’s museum. Day one: a map of Exeter Day two: domestic decoration Today I want to talk filthy lucre. One of the things I learnt at the RAMM was that Exeter was...
From: the many-headed monster on 18 Dec 2013

The Tudor South West at Exeter’s Royal Albert Memorial Museum: Part 2 – Domestic Decoration

Laura Sangha This is the second post in a week long series about an exhibition at Exeter’s museum. View the first post on a map of Exeter here. In early modern England the population was expanding incredibly rapidly and massive inflation led to...
From: the many-headed monster on 17 Dec 2013

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