The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "prisoners of war"

Showing 1 - 20 of 118

Your search for posts with tags containing prisoners of war found 118 posts

Don Hagist on Drummer Thomas Walker’s War

Don Hagist, author of British Soldiers, American War and editor of the Journal of the American Revolution, is my go-to advisor on British military records.  Every so often Don unearths a new gem of information about redcoats who served in Massachusetts,...
From: Boston 1775 on 3 Mar 2020

Rutland’s Rebellion: Defending Local Governance during the Revolution

Typically, countries at war do not detain enemy prisoners in the backyards of their citizens. During the Revolutionary War Britain’s soon-to-be independent North American... The post Rutland’s Rebellion: Defending Local Governance during the...

Fort Plain Museum Conference, 11-14 June

The Fort Plain Museum has announced the speakers at its annual American Revolution Mohawk Valley Conference, scheduled for 11-14 June 2020. I’ve attended this event in the past and enjoyed not only the speakers but the dedication of the organizers...
From: Boston 1775 on 9 Feb 2020

Contributor Close-Up: Katie Turner Getty

What inspired you to start researching and writing about the Revolution? It was perhaps inevitable that I would end up studying the Revolution as... The post Contributor Close-Up: Katie Turner Getty appeared first on Journal of the American Revolution.

The Fighting Ground “between the Enemy & the American force”

Asa Lord was born on 29 June 1760 in Saybrook, Connecticut. Around the time he turned sixteen, he signed up for a few months of military service, and he continued to do short-term stints as the war continued.Lord was eighteen years old in April 1779 when...
From: Boston 1775 on 20 Jan 2020

Raid on Isaac Hatfield’s House

As I described yesterday, in January 1780 Capts. Samuel Lockwood and Samuel Keeler of the Connecticut militia attacked the home of Isaac Hatfield, Jr., in Morrisania, New York. Hatfield (1748-1822) had been born in America to a substantial farming family...
From: Boston 1775 on 19 Jan 2020

Capt. Samuel Lockwood at War

Samuel Lockwood (1737–1807, gravestone shown here courtesy of Find a Grave) of Greenwich, Connecticut, became a second lieutenant in the Continental Army in April 1775.That fall, he joined Gen. Richard Montgomery’s invasion of Canada. On 5...
From: Boston 1775 on 18 Jan 2020

A Double Exhumation in 1784 Connecticut

On 22 June 1784, the Connecticut Courant ran an article which has become highly significant for hunters of vampires and vampire lore. It read:WHEREAS of late years there has been advanced for a certainty, by a certain Quack Doctor, a foreigner, that a...
From: Boston 1775 on 8 Jan 2020

Tar, Feathers, and the Trevett Brothers

A couple of days ago, I quoted George Gailer’s court filing after he was assaulted with tar and feathers (and other things) on 28 Oct 1769.That legal document named seven individuals as having taken part in the attack. Those were the people Gailer...
From: Boston 1775 on 7 Nov 2019

Giving Thanks: John Gridley’s Prayer Bill

Housed in the Medfield Historical Society is a rare collection of prayer bills containing the prayers of thanksgiving from Massachusetts soldiers and their families... The post Giving Thanks: John Gridley’s Prayer Bill appeared first on Journal...

Augustine Barrett, Escaped British Prisoner of War, Pleads his Case

“About five weeks after he made his escape from Prospect hill,” Augustine Barrett told the board of inquiry, “he was confined in the Prison... The post Augustine Barrett, Escaped British Prisoner of War, Pleads his Case appeared first...

Schoolmasters with the Initials “J.L.”

As quoted yesterday, in the summer of 1775 London newspapers reported that letters found on the body of Dr. Joseph Warren after the Battle of Bunker Hill implicated some people in Boston as “spies.”The newspapers disagreed on how many letters...
From: Boston 1775 on 1 Jul 2019

“Letters were found in the Doctor’s pocket”

On 29 July 1775, the Middlesex Journal, a newspaper published in London, reported this tidbit about the Battle of Bunker Hill:The day after the late battle in America, some of the Regulars searched the pockets of Dr. [Joseph] Warren, who was killed, and...
From: Boston 1775 on 30 Jun 2019

Jacob Frost’s Compensation for “Capitivity”

Back in 2017 I looked into a sketch titled “The Young Provincial” and published in The Token, for 1830.An edition of the collected works of Nathaniel Hawthorne (above right) attributed that sketch to him. But, as literary scholars have concluded...
From: Boston 1775 on 23 Jun 2019

Ezekiel Brown in the Boston Jail

When the British army put Thomas Kettell and other provincial prisoners from the Battle of Bunker Hill into the Boston jail, one of the men they found there was Ezekiel Brown (1744-1824) of Concord.Robert Gross discusses Brown at length in The Minutemen...
From: Boston 1775 on 21 Jun 2019

Thomas Kettell: Underage Prisoner after Bunker Hill

One of the last survivors of the Battle of Bunker Hill was Thomas Kettell, who died on 17 Sept 1850. He had lived seventy-five years after the battle, long enough to see the Bunker Hill Monument (for which he subscribed $5) not only started but completed.The...
From: Boston 1775 on 20 Jun 2019

Pvt. James Melvin’s Journal in Manuscript

The American Revolution Institute, part of the Anderson House museum and library of the Society of the Cincinnati, has acquired the manuscript journal of Pvt. James Melvin. Melvin was born in Concord in 1749, according to John Melvin of Charlestown and...
From: Boston 1775 on 13 Jun 2019

Quebec Town Major William Dunbar: Captured, April 1775

In early 1775, the town major of Quebec decided to pay a visit to Gen. Thomas Gage in Boston. William Dunbar had been an... The post Quebec Town Major William Dunbar: Captured, April 1775 appeared first on Journal of the American Revolution.

Page 1 of 6123456Last »

Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.