The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "process"

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Your search for posts with tags containing process found 123 posts

O’ the roast beef of old England…

Engraving of William Hogarth’s 1748 painting ‘O the Roast Beef of Old England’ (London, Tate Britain), which he had himself published as a print. The scene is set at the Gate of Calais (after the painting in the Tate Gallery) with a fat monk prodding...
From: Recent Antiquarian Acquisitions on 25 Aug 2021

The introduction of the Pope to the Convocation at Oxford

“A satire on the approaching election for the Chancellorship of Oxford University. Grenville, dressed as a cardinal, heads a small procession towards the Devil, who wears a robe on which is a large cross, and holds the bland mask with which he has been...
From: Recent Antiquarian Acquisitions on 6 Aug 2021

“Flaneuring” through a morning: more research joys

It has been so long since I posted here I couldn’t figure out how to do it. My last post was at the end of October of last year, so close to six months ago. It feels more like a year to me, in part because of our molassas-slow new reality. That...
From: Baroque Explorations on 27 Apr 2021

Frazzled much? The challenges of writing fact-based historical fiction

I’ve been stuck for nearly a week over a chapter in the WIP. (The whip, I think ruefully, as I type those letters.) The problem has many causes. One is that I have a stubborn need to know where-the-heck my heroine (Elizabeth Tudor, in this instance)...
From: Baroque Explorations on 19 Sep 2020

On Plague, Sweating Sickness, and Covid-19

The novel I’m writing now is set in mid-16th century England. During this time period episodes of black plague and the quickly lethal “sweating sickness” came and went. With each epidemic, enormous numbers of people died. Long ago,...
From: Baroque Explorations on 24 Jul 2020

Curating; or, building the manuscript inde

Back in early 2018, I composed a series of blog posts about getting started with turning a dissertation into a book, including researching the publishing process, targeting series, oft-circulated myths, and, in five parts, how to fund it. The, at the...
From: Bite Thumbnails on 9 Dec 2019

On turning 75, NaNoWriMo and Day of the Dead

Tomorrow I turn 75. That will certainly be a milestone. Which of course made me curious about the word milestone. As with nearly all historical explorations, it proved to be exceptionally interesting. Milestones were originally stone obelisks –...
From: Baroque Explorations on 3 Nov 2019

On outlining and constructing a timeline/calendar

In preparation for NaNoWriMo‘s blast-through-a-first draft-November, I’m following K.M. Weiland’s roadmap on constructing an outline. I’ve outlined my last three novels, but each time it’s like starting from scratch. In any...
From: Baroque Explorations on 7 Oct 2019

“Exceedingly pleasant and healthy” — Discovering the village of Adisham

One of the most challenging things for me in writing a YA novel based on the scant (and most likely apocryphal) stories “Mary of Canterbury” has been figuring out where to place her. I needed to find an old village in the countryside close...
From: Baroque Explorations on 30 Aug 2019

Litigious virtue; or, preparing the book manuscript

The two hardest parts of writing a book for me has been project design and the daily starting line.[1] The design for the book’s research question was a fraught process that took nearly two years of graduate school. It is in this aspect that I think...
From: Bite Thumbnails on 27 Jul 2019

‘Membering: or, a look at revising a book

Back in early 2018, I composed a series of blog posts about researching the publishing process, targeting series, oft-circulated myths, and, in five parts, how to fund it. I am now two-thirds through my own revision process before final submission, having...
From: Bite Thumbnails on 22 Jul 2019

On beginning (again) with Sarah Waters

In Canada, I have a tall narrow shelf of books—one of many shelves of books I have in our house. This one includes poetry, novels I’m either reading or would like to read, and an embarrassing number of books on writing. I am a collector, apparently,...
From: Baroque Explorations on 17 May 2019

A Practical Handbook for … writers?

One of the books I have in San Miguel is A Practical Handbook for the Actor, by Bruder, Cohn, Olnek and Pollack. It was a useful book to consult when writing about actors in The Shadow Queen, but it’s now and again also mentioned as a useful book...
From: Baroque Explorations on 29 Apr 2019

Where have I been?

Where have I been? When we arrived in San Miguel de Allende (Mexico) over five months ago, I went on a blogging spree. I was inspired, in part, by the refreshing wonder of fast internet. A month later, I stopped writing blog posts, getting down to...
From: Baroque Explorations on 15 Apr 2019

Text-Analysis Unconference: Treating Texts as Data

SAVE THE DATE for this upcoming event at the University of Calgary’s Taylor Family Digital Library: April 15, 2019, 9am-12noon If texts – from survey transcripts to Shakespearean drama to social-media posts — are the objects of...
From: Michael Ullyot on 2 Apr 2019

Unexpected Discoveries at the David Library by Dusty Marie Dye

Guest blogger Dusty Marie Dye is a PhD candidate at the University of Maryland. During her residency as a 2018-19 David Library Fellow last summer, she came across some  passages in orderly books, correspondence and diaries that were both insightful,...

“Time for Another Kent State”? Politician Targets Campuses for Violence

Politicians are targeting university campuses for repressive violence. In 2017, Dan Adamini (Republican), Secretary of the Marquette County Republican Party, advocated using firearms to stop protests on university campuses, such as the recent one at the...

The procession of the Lord Mayor of London

“Stylised representation of the Lord Mayor’s procession, framing a blank space in the centre of the sheet; two rows of figures at the top, 7 groups one above the other to either side, and the City Counsel on foot, the Aldermen and Lord Mayor...
From: Recent Antiquarian Acquisitions on 29 Jan 2019

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Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.