The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "procession"

Your search for posts with tags containing procession found 12 posts

O’ the roast beef of old England…

Engraving of William Hogarth’s 1748 painting ‘O the Roast Beef of Old England’ (London, Tate Britain), which he had himself published as a print. The scene is set at the Gate of Calais (after the painting in the Tate Gallery) with a fat monk prodding...
From: Recent Antiquarian Acquisitions on 25 Aug 2021

The introduction of the Pope to the Convocation at Oxford

“A satire on the approaching election for the Chancellorship of Oxford University. Grenville, dressed as a cardinal, heads a small procession towards the Devil, who wears a robe on which is a large cross, and holds the bland mask with which he has been...
From: Recent Antiquarian Acquisitions on 6 Aug 2021

Unexpected Discoveries at the David Library by Dusty Marie Dye

Guest blogger Dusty Marie Dye is a PhD candidate at the University of Maryland. During her residency as a 2018-19 David Library Fellow last summer, she came across some  passages in orderly books, correspondence and diaries that were both insightful,...

The procession of the Lord Mayor of London

“Stylised representation of the Lord Mayor’s procession, framing a blank space in the centre of the sheet; two rows of figures at the top, 7 groups one above the other to either side, and the City Counsel on foot, the Aldermen and Lord Mayor...
From: Recent Antiquarian Acquisitions on 29 Jan 2019

The funeral procession of His Royal Highness the Prince of Wales

A panoramic view of the procession at head and foot, each group numbered with corresponding index at foot. Further vignettes of the ‘Procession from Leicester House’ and ‘Laying in State’ to left and right. Title: The funeral...
From: Recent Antiquarian Acquisitions on 28 Sep 2018

A correct view of the funeral procession of Her Late Most Gracious Majesty

A depiction of Caroline of Brunswick’s funeral procession, which captures the public mood of Caroline having been both poorly treated and sent to an early grave. Groups of men are shown carrying large banners stating ‘The Power of Public Opinion’...
From: Recent Antiquarian Acquisitions on 20 Aug 2018

In the City of London

Sharon Little, Freeman of the City of London, with her certificate and officials This week I visited London’s Guildhall where my niece was granted the Freedom of the City of London. I hadn’t realised that about 1800 Freemen are admitted...
From: The Shakespeare blog on 30 Oct 2015

Eucharistic Procession in London on October 9

Joanna Bogle writes in The National Catholic Register about the Eucharistic Procession from Westminster to St. George cathedrals in London held in honor of Blessed John Henry Newman. She uses it as a way to assess the changes in response to Catholicism...

Palm Sunday in England before the Reformation

The Catholic Church in England before the Reformation used some adaptations of the Latin or Roman Rite called the Sarum Use. These adaptations had developed at Salisbury Cathedral and took their name from the Latin for Salisbury. During Holy Week, these...

Report on the Veneration of "La Sainte Couronne d'Epines" at Notre Dame

As I had planned, I did attend the Veneration of the Crown of Thorns at Notre Dame Cathedral in Paris last Friday. I rode the free Metro from the station near our apartment to Bastille on Line 8 and transferred to Line 1 for Hotel de Ville. Walking...

Picturing Shakespeare’s characters

My last post was about processions of people dressed as Shakespeare’s characters, especially in relation to David Garrick’s The Jubilee. It’s as if they have a life independent of the plays, so nobody would be surprised to see Falstaff,...
From: The Shakespeare blog on 22 Jan 2014

Taking to the streets with Shakespeare’s characters

The Procession at the Jubilee at Stratford upon Avon [London, 1769]. From the collections of the Lewis Walpole Library, Yale UniversityShakespeare celebrations in Stratford have taken many forms over the past two and a half centuries. I’ve written...
From: The Shakespeare blog on 20 Jan 2014

Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.