The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "protestantism"

Your search for posts with tags containing protestantism found 20 posts

“They Chase Specters”: The Irrational, the Political, and Fear of Elections in Colonial Pennsylvania

By J. L. Tomlin Surveying the situation on the eve of Pennsylvania’s 1726 General Assembly elections, Quaker James Logan realized he’d come to despise the colony’s democratic process. To him, its participants were seemingly “vile...
From: Age of Revolutions on 3 Dec 2020

“That Damned Absurd Word Liberty:” Les Habitants, the Quebec Act, and American Revolutionary Ideology, 1774–1776

The American invasion of Quebec of 1775-1776 failed to achieve its primary objective: to bring into the fold what the Continental Congress referred to... The post “That Damned Absurd Word Liberty:” Les Habitants, the Quebec Act, and American...

CALL FOR PAPERS: Reformation Studies Colloquium

This year’s Reformation Studies Colloquium will be held at the University of Essex, Colchester on Thursday 30 August to Saturday 1 September 2018.The conference, which meets biannually, will bring together established as well as younger scholars...
From: The Renaissance Diary on 30 Aug 2018

Marcus WatkinsonThis is a silver gilt communion cup and paten...

Marcus WatkinsonThis is a silver gilt communion cup and paten cover. It was made in 1575 for Holy Trinity Church by John Jones, one of the wealthiest and most prominent goldsmiths in early modern Exeter. Although only about 2,000 communion cups from this...

Luther and England’s Long Reformation

Today is the 500th anniversary of an event that may never have happened, but which may as well have. Sometimes, what really matters in history is not what really happened, but what people have said about it. This is true in my own area of interest, the...
From: wartsandbrawls on 31 Oct 2017

ANSWERS

ANSWERS By Jillian Snyder Outside and in: St Swithun’s Church, Lower Quinton, Warwickshire. Outside and in: St Swithun’s Church, Lower Quinton, Warwickshire. Jillian Snyder is a Ph.D. student at the University of Notre Dame, Indiana, and...
From: Blogging Shakespeare on 19 Aug 2017

QUESTIONS

QUESTIONS By Jillian Snyder   Jillian Snyder peering through ‘History Play’ (2001) by Jane Lawrence, in the grounds of Anne Hathaway’s Cottage. Jillian Snyder is a Ph.D. student at the University of Notre Dame, Indiana, and was...
From: Blogging Shakespeare on 17 Aug 2017

The Faith of William Shakespeare

The Faith of William Shakespeare: a one-day conferenceSaturday 20 May from 10.00am to 5.00pm, the Wolfson Hall, The Shakespeare Centre, Henley Street. By Rev. Dr Paul Edmondson, Head of Research, The Shakespeare Birthplace Trust. Imagine the world into...
From: Blogging Shakespeare on 14 Apr 2017

The Limits of Religious Liberty: Rabaut Saint-Étienne and the French Revolution

By Bryan A. Banks In 1685, Louis XIV revoked Henri IV’s Edict of Nantes and effectively outlawed Calvinism in France. This led to the expulsion of around 200,000 Huguenots into the Diaspora and inaugurated a period of forced conversions at home...
From: Age of Revolutions on 18 Apr 2016

On Serpents and Sinners

The date is August 1614, and the anonymous author of an in-credible tale relaying the discovery of a dragon in the heart of Sussex is aware that you may not believe him. Let’s face it: this is seventeenth-century England, not The Land...
From: wartsandbrawls on 10 Sep 2015

12 July 1543: Henry VIII Marries Katherine Parr

On 12 July 1543 at Hampton Court Palace, King Henry VIII of England married for the sixth and final time. His bride was thirty-one year old Katherine Parr, the eldest daughter of Thomas and Maud Parr. Unlike Anne Boleyn, Jane Seymour or Katherine Howard,...
From: Conor Byrne on 12 Jul 2015

Early modern/medieval histories [updated]

A significant part of my research is devoted to early modern readings of medieval histories. In particular, I have written about how medieval chronicle traditions were continued into the sixteenth, seventeenth and even eighteenth centuries: for example,...
From: Early modern/medieval histories on 13 Feb 2014

Early modern/medieval histories

A significant part of my research is devoted to early modern readings of medieval histories. In particular, I have written about how medieval chronicle traditions were continued into the sixteenth, seventeenth and even eighteenth centuries: for example,...
From: Early modern/medieval histories on 7 Jan 2014

Review: Native Apostles: Black and Indian Missionaries in the British Atlantic World

On the eve of the American Revolution, an unlikely band of ministers and benefactors devised a plan to send John Quamine, a free black man, and Bristol Yamma, a slave, as missionaries to Africa. The project was conceived by the two would-be missionaries...
From: The Junto on 26 Nov 2013

The Richard L. Greaves Award to Kathleen Lynch

On 15 August 2013, Kathleen Lynch received the award from David Gay, chairman of the  selection committee (2010-2013), for her monograph, Protestant Autobiography in the Seventeenth-Century Anglophone World, published in 2012 by Oxford University Press. ...
From: Dissenting Experience on 18 Aug 2013

Johann Philipp Maul and the Healing Waters of Schwelm

Built in 1790, this neat ‘Brunnenhaus’ still marks the spot where the healing waters once flowed in Schwelm. In Maul’s own day, there was only a simple wooden construction. At the truly exciting conference that was ESSWE4 (University...
From: PRAELUDIA MICROCOSMICA on 1 Jul 2013

The Execution of Lady Jane Grey, Queen of England

On this day, February 12 1554, Lady Jane Grey, famously the Nine - or more accurately, Thirteen - Day Queen was beheaded privately on Tower Green, shortly after her teenage husband Guildford Dudley had been executed on Tower Hill. Last week I detailed...
From: Conor Byrne on 12 Feb 2013

Livorno Non-Catholic indexes (1818-1865) silently updating…

The Livorno’s Non-Catholic Civil Births’ Index (1818-1865) has been silently updated in the past few days, after the initial release of letters A-E, and is now fully published online. The index is comprised of 6666 single entries and a little...
From: Leghorn Merchant Networks on 2 Dec 2012

Livorno Non-Catholic Birth, Marriage, and Death indexes (1818-1865) are online.

For the first time this fundamental source for the history of Livorno is being gradually published on this blog. The first batch of the Births’ Index is already online and it includes letters A through E totalling a little more than 2000 individuals....
From: Leghorn Merchant Networks on 19 Nov 2012

Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.