The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "psychiatry"

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Your search for posts with tags containing psychiatry found 38 posts

Fire Buckets and the Fenno Family

The Skinner auctioneers blog offers Christopher D. Fox’s detailed discussion of firefighting and leather fire buckets in Boston. In particular, Fox profiles one maker of those buckets:While there were certainly a number of merchants in Boston from...
From: Boston 1775 on 12 May 2020

After James Otis “behaved very madly’

On 8 May 1770, 250 years ago today, Bostonians gathered for one of their annual town meetings.Every March, the white men of the town elected its selectmen and other officials for the coming year. Every May, a smaller section of those white men, those...
From: Boston 1775 on 8 May 2020

Why There Are No James Otis Papers

When James Otis, Jr., died in 1783, John Adams was in Europe as one of the U.S. of A.’s first diplomatic ministers. While occasionally peeved by Otis’s moods, Adams admired the older man greatly for his learning, legal skills, and early resistance...
From: Boston 1775 on 23 Apr 2020

The Disappearance of Jonathan Sewall

In the mid-1760s, Jonathan Sewall allied with Gov. Francis Bernard, writing pseudonymous newspaper essays lampooning James Otis and favoring the Crown. The governor appointed Sewall to be attorney general of Massachusetts in 1767.Sometime in March 1770,...
From: Boston 1775 on 5 Apr 2020

“Otis got into a mad freak to-night”

With everything else going on in Boston in the wake of the Boston Massacre, I don’t want to lose track of James Otis’s mental state.In early September 1769, Otis was speaking extravagantly, monopolizing conversation, and annoying even his...
From: Boston 1775 on 18 Mar 2020

“James Otis having ever entertain’d a most consummate Contempt of seeking a Purse”

On 14 Sept 1772, a little more than three years after James Otis, Jr., and John Robinson got into a fight inside the British Coffee-House, the lead item on the front page of Edes and Gill’s Boston Gazette spelled out the end of that dispute.Otis...
From: Boston 1775 on 8 Dec 2019

James Otis’s Legal Recovery

As James Otis, Jr., recovered physically from the blow on his head with the help of top Boston doctors, he also took legal steps with the help of top Boston lawyers. In order of seniority, the three men Otis hired to represent him were:Samuel Fitch (1724-1799)John...
From: Boston 1775 on 7 Dec 2019

James Otis’s Medical Recovery

According to James Otis’s first biographer, William Tudor, Jr., after his brawl in the British Coffee-House in September 1769 he received care from “Doctors Perkins and Lloyd.”Dr. James Lloyd (1728-1810, shown here) was one of Boston’s...
From: Boston 1775 on 6 Dec 2019

Otis and Robinson Continue Their Fight in the Newspapers

The earliest public comment I’ve seen from James Otis, Jr., about his altercation with John Robinson on 5 Sept 1769 was an “Advertisement” that appeared in the 11 September Boston Gazette. It’s remarkable for the amount of emphasis...
From: Boston 1775 on 4 Dec 2019

The Paragraphs James Otis Cooked Up

In his diary John Adams described how he spent the evening of Sunday, 3 Sept 1769, in the Edes and Gill print shop: “preparing for the Next Days Newspaper—a curious Employment. Cooking up Paragraphs, Articles, Occurences, &c.—working...
From: Boston 1775 on 6 Oct 2019

“Otis indulged himself in all his Airs”

So far I’ve been discussing the affray between Customs official John Robinson and Boston politician James Otis, Jr., in the context of larger politics—the non-importation campaign in Boston, and the leaks of royal government documents from...
From: Boston 1775 on 5 Oct 2019

Considering Jonathan Plummer, Jr.

Last year Alex Cain shared a detailed profile of Jonathan Plummer, Jr., a Revolutionary War veteran celebrated as “poet laureate to Lord Timothy Dexter.”Alex wrote:Jonathan Plummer Jr. was born in 1761 Newbury, Massachusetts and was the oldest...
From: Boston 1775 on 27 Jul 2019

Running the Numbers on the Massachusetts Convention

On Monday, 26 Sept 1768—250 years ago today—the Massachusetts Convention returned to Faneuil Hall after taking the Sabbath off. Gov. Francis Bernard reported that on that Monday the gathering declared itself to be in committee, which by eighteenth-century...
From: Boston 1775 on 26 Sep 2018

Robert Burns’s “damn’d melange of fretfulness and melancholy”

Last month the B.B.C. reported on a published paper by Moira Hansen, Daniel J. Smith, and Gerard Carruthers about the moods of Robert Burns (P.D.F. download).Specifically, the paper is titled “Mood Disorder in the Personal Correspondence of Robert...
From: Boston 1775 on 8 Jul 2018

The Man Who Shot Daniel Phelps

The Rev. David Avery identified the fellow provincial soldier who accidentally shot Daniel Phelps as “Mr. —— Yale of Col. [John] Patterson's company.”In 1854 the Stockbridge chronicler Electa F. Jones referred to the man as  “Mr....
From: Boston 1775 on 10 May 2018

Was Bentham on the Autism Spectrum?

Last year I relayed the news that British philosopher and social reformer Jeremy Bentham’s body was coming to America for a museum exhibit.To be exact, Bentham’s clothed skeleton will be in display in New York at the Breuer branch of...
From: Boston 1775 on 18 Feb 2018

Mockingbird: Using Theatre to Promote Awareness about Postnatal Psychosis

By Diana Jefferies, Western Sydney University Mockingbird: A Black Comedy about Motherhood and Mental HealthThe fourteenth-century Book of Margery Kempe opens with an account of an illness Margery experienced after the birth of her first child. The account...
From: Histories of Emotion on 1 Feb 2018

Charles Lee and a “distemper’d brain”

In a letter to Dr. Benjamin Rush in Philadelphia dated 19 Sept 1775, Gen. Charles Lee complained about the Continental Army’s New England troops. And then he complained about Rush’s colleagues at the Continental Congress. And then he complained...
From: Boston 1775 on 19 Sep 2017

Emotions and Device-Oriented Psychiatry in the Early Twentieth Century

By Chris Rudge, The University of Sydney In July 1907, the Swiss psychiatrist Carl Gustav Jung and American neurologist Frederick Peterson published the results of their investigations into the galvanometer and the pneumograph in BRAIN, the journal of...
From: Histories of Emotion on 11 Aug 2017

Quacks & Hacks: Walter Freeman and the Lobotomobile

  On 12 November 1935, a Portuguese neurologist named Antonio Egas Moniz [below right] became the first individual to perform what would later be known as a lobotomy. Moniz’s work built upon that of the 19th-century Swiss psychiatrist, Gottlieb...
From: The Chirurgeon's Apprentice on 14 Jun 2017

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Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.