The Early Modern Commons

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Your search for posts with tags containing publishing found 274 posts

Suffrage Stories

I apologize for my disappearance without a heads-up: the combination of computer problems and travel rendered me postless for a week! I am back with the first of what will be a series of reading lists for the summer, but first some big news: I’ve...
From: streets of salem on 4 Jul 2020

How to Research in the Online-Only World, part VI

There has been a brief hiatus in posting instalments to this short series of tips. That is because the past week has been a busy one for Kent’s Centre for Medieval and Early Modern Studies. It ended with the annual MEMSFest, which is a highpoint...

The emergence of modern astronomy – a complex mosaic: Part XXXVI

  From about 1630 onwards there were only two serious contenders under European astronomers, as the correct scientific description of the cosmos, on the one hand a Tychonic geo-heliocentric model, mostly with diurnal rotation and on the other Johannes...
From: The Renaissance Mathematicus on 20 May 2020

A uniform collection of maps should have been a Theatre but became an Atlas instead but it might have been a Mirror.

Early Modern cartography was centred round a group of pioneers working in the Netherlands in the sixteenth century. The two best-known cartographers being Gerhard Mercator and Abraham Ortelius but they were by no means the only map publishers competing...
From: The Renaissance Mathematicus on 13 May 2020

The emergence of modern astronomy – a complex mosaic: Part XXXIII

In the previous episode of this series we looked into the academic literature that spread knowledge of the heliocentric system during the seventeenth century. However, there was another genre of literature during the century that was also partially dedicated...
From: The Renaissance Mathematicus on 8 Apr 2020

How Renaissance Nürnberg became the Scientific Instrument Capital of Europe

This is a writen version of the lecture that I was due to hold at the Science and the City conference in London on 7 April 2020. The conference has for obvious reasons been cancelled and will now take place on the Internet. The title of my piece is, of...
From: The Renaissance Mathematicus on 1 Apr 2020

3 into 2 does go!

It would of course be totally unethical for me to review a book of which I am one of the authors. However, as my contribution is only six of two-hundred pages, of which three are illustrations, and the book is one that could/would/should interest some...
From: The Renaissance Mathematicus on 25 Mar 2020

The emergence of modern astronomy – a complex mosaic: Part XXXII

In the seventeenth century large parts of Europe were still Catholic; in 1616 the Catholic Church had placed De revolutionibus and all other texts promoting a heliocentric world-view on the Index of Forbidden Books and in 1632 they added Galileo’s...
From: The Renaissance Mathematicus on 18 Mar 2020

The emergence of modern astronomy – a complex mosaic: Part XXI

A widespread myth in the popular history of astronomy is that Galileo Galilei (1564–1642) was the first or even the only astronomer to realise the potential of the newly invented telescope as an instrument for astronomy. This perception is very...
From: The Renaissance Mathematicus on 10 Oct 2019

The Business of Transnational History: An Editor’s Perspective

Michael J. McGandy [Michael McGandy is Senior Editor at Cornell University Press, with a keen sense of the field of early North American history. Borealia’s Keith Grant recently sat down with him (virtually) to talk about how transnational history,...
From: Borealia on 9 Sep 2019

World of the Siege FOR SALE

At fine bookshops everywhere. It’s been a long time coming, but it’s finally here. So go right out and purchase one or ten copies of the sleeper hit of the summer! To quote from the tightly-constructed blurb: The World of the Siege examines...
From: Skulking in Holes and Corners on 15 Aug 2019

Keep Calm and R&R

It’s August, and for academics hoping to get some writing done this summer, it’s go time. In conversations with my writing group colleagues, who come from fields as diverse as information sciences, business, community health, and religion,...
From: The Junto on 6 Aug 2019

The emergence of modern astronomy – a complex mosaic: Part XI

Despite the high level of anticipation De revolutionibus cannot be in anyway described as hitting the streets running; it was more a case of dribbling out very slowly into the public awareness. There are several reasons for this. Today there is a...
From: The Renaissance Mathematicus on 22 May 2019

At last, MURDER KNOCKS TWICE is out in the world...

There's a funny thing about persistence that writers often talk about. We talk about continuing despite the odds, mustering up the courage to keep writing even when things get hard, just pushing on even when the outcome is not known.This is what I felt...
From: Susanna Calkins, Author on 30 Apr 2019

The emergence of modern astronomy – a complex mosaic: Part IX

In 1542 the manuscript of De revolutionibusarrived at Petreius’ printing office in Nürnberg followed by Rheticus who intended to see it through the press. I argued in Part VII that Johannes Petreius had in fact commissioned Rheticus to see...
From: The Renaissance Mathematicus on 24 Apr 2019

Review: Katharine Gerbner, Christian Slavery: Conversion and Race in the Protestant Atlantic World

On the heels of its recent release in paperback, today The Junto features a review of Christian Slavery: Conversion and Race in the Protestant Atlantic World (University of Pennsylvania Press, 2018). Stay tuned tomorrow for an interview with the author,...
From: The Junto on 18 Apr 2019

Renaissance Heavy Metal

One of the most fascinating and spectacularly illustrated Renaissance books on science and technology is De re metallica by Georgius Agricola (1494–1555). Translated into English the author’s name sounds like a figure from a game of happy...
From: The Renaissance Mathematicus on 17 Apr 2019

The emergence of modern astronomy – a complex mosaic: Part VIII

We left Georg Joachim Rheticus[1](1514–1574) just setting out on his journey from Feldkirch to Frombork for what would turn out to be one of the most fateful meetings in the history of science. Our wealthy professor of mathematics travelled in style...
From: The Renaissance Mathematicus on 10 Apr 2019

Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.