The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "punishment"

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Your search for posts with tags containing punishment found 79 posts

Death by burning – Elizabeth Boardingham 1742-1776

Elizabeth Boardingham was one of the last women in England to be sentenced to death by burning, but was this really how her life came to an end?  Today, we’ll take a look at her life and discover a little more about its end. Elizabeth, you would imagine,...
From: All Things Georgian on 4 Apr 2022

The Story of Bathsheba Spooner

I am delighted to welcome, author, Andrew Noone, whose book, ‘Bathsheba Spooner, A Revolutionary Murder Conspiracy’ makes for a fascinating read. Bathsheba was was the first woman in American history to be executed following the Declaration of...
From: All Things Georgian on 21 Mar 2022

The mystery of John Edward Despard

So far we have looked at Catherine Despard’s life and the demise of her husband, Colonel Edward Marcus Despard, but of course there was a son, John Edward  which today’s post will take a brief look at. If you have missed the three articles about...
From: All Things Georgian on 14 Mar 2022

Gaol and Gaol-breaking in Early Modern Ireland

Posted by Coleman A. Dennehy, 13 March 2022 Whilst many aspects of the state as we would understand it today were more likely under-developed if they existed at all, the gaol was actually a reasonably prominent and regular feature of the medieval English...
From: Legal History Miscellany on 13 Mar 2022

Catherine, the wife of Colonel Edward Marcus Despard – Part 3

Today we are concluding the story of Catherine Despard, but if you missed the previous articles, part one can be found here and part two here. In February 1799 the Whitehall Evening Post provided a transcript of events in Parliament including a speech...
From: All Things Georgian on 9 Mar 2022

Catherine, the wife of Colonel Edward Marcus Despard – Part 1

As there is so much to tell in this story, during the next few days I will be taking a look at the life of Catherine Despard and that of her son, so do keep an eye out for the following parts. Firstly though, I  would like to give a massive ‘Thank...
From: All Things Georgian on 7 Mar 2022

Brides and Bigamy

I am delighted to welcome back, ‘legal eagle’ Melanie Barnes, who, with today being Valentine’s Day, is taking a look at brides and bigamy. Ramsay, Allan; Lord Chancellor Hardwicke (1690-1764); Dover Collections When the government introduced Lord...
From: All Things Georgian on 14 Feb 2022

Hudibras in tribulation

“Hudibras and Ralpho are in the stocks, the knight’s boots, sword and pistols taking the place of the fiddle; a sympathetic widow, accompanied by her maid, addresses Hudibras while villagers gather round to mock, and a small boy urinates on Ralpho’s...
From: Recent Antiquarian Acquisitions on 26 Jan 2022

Blood Brothers – 18th century martial punishment

I am thrilled to welcome to All Things Georgian a new guest, Melanie Barnes. Mel is is a lawyer and recent NFTS Screenwriting MA graduate, who has more than a passing interest in 18th century marriage law, military history and like myself, she loves all...
From: All Things Georgian on 10 Jan 2022

Britannia correcting an unruly boy

“Britannia, tall and powerful, holds Napoleon across her knee, and raises a birch rod to thrash his bleeding posterior. She wears Roman draperies, with corslet and plumed helmet. The rod is tied with a ribbon inscribed: ‘United Kingdoms’. She says:...
From: Recent Antiquarian Acquisitions on 7 Dec 2021

A Horrid Deed The Life and Death of Joe the Quilter

It’s always a pleasure to welcome new guest authors to All Things Georgian and today I’d like to welcome Robert N. Smith who tells us more about the day to day life in the north of England during the Georgian era and his analysis of the truly shocking...
From: All Things Georgian on 11 Oct 2021

Tirania

Ferdinand VII, seated on a throne on a low platform inscribed “TIRANIA”, is flanked by two advisers, the Devil on the left and a friar on the right. At the friar’s feet, in the foreground, a demon burns newspapers with a firebrand. Tortures of the...
From: Recent Antiquarian Acquisitions on 1 Oct 2021

Justice and (Mis)Fortune in the Wake of Wyatt’s Revolt

Posted by Krista J. Kesselring, 12 July 2021. In July of 2020, federal executions resumed in the United States. Now, a year later, the U.S. Attorney General has mandated a temporary moratorium on the death penalty’s use in federal cases while awaiting...
From: Legal History Miscellany on 12 Jul 2021

Surviving an Execution in Medieval England and Modern Ohio: Miracle, or Incompetence?

Posted by Sara M. Butler; 5 February 2021. In Ohio, Governor DeWine’s landmark 8 December 2020 press conference has left the future of felony execution in the state up in the air. The indefinite delay in capital punishment announced back in 2018...
From: Legal History Miscellany on 5 Feb 2021

Gin – definitely ‘mother’s ruin’ as far as Judith Defour was concerned.

Detail from Newton’s Samples of Sweethearts and Wives, via Lewis Walpole Library We all know about the eighteenth century gin craze: how men and women of ‘the lower orders’  got completely rat-arsed. As Hogarth put in his print...
From: Georgian Gentleman on 6 Dec 2020

Law Enforcement Officials and the Limits of Violence in Medieval England

Posted by Sara M. Butler, 18 August 2020. Towards the end of the fifteenth century, William Hemyng, a chaplain associated with Hereford cathedral, experienced a harrowing ordeal. Richard Rollesden, undersheriff to Thomas Parker, the county sheriff, stole...
From: Legal History Miscellany on 18 Aug 2020

Gaol Fever Stories

Posted by Krista J. Kesselring, 28 April 2020. Recent news reports on the high rates of COVID-19 infection amongst people living in prisons and other carceral facilities are sobering, to say the least. The current outbreaks are also depressingly, disturbingly...
From: Legal History Miscellany on 28 Apr 2020

“then my Lad you Swing”

On route to London from Deal, where the passengers from the ship Active were put ashore, ABIGAIL ADAMS describes an encounter with a highwayman in the journal she is intending to send to her sister MARY CRANCH. From Chatham we proceeded, on our way as...
From: In the Words of Women on 5 Nov 2019

Casualty of Revolution: The Sad Case of Betty Smith

On October 1, 1768, two regiments of British infantry with an artillery detachment—witnesses estimated 700 to 800 men in all—disembarked from transports in Boston... The post Casualty of Revolution: The Sad Case of Betty Smith appeared first...

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By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

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Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.