The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "quarto"

Your search for posts with tags containing quarto found 12 posts

Paying for Shakespeare: Henry Folger’s Checks

By Stephen H. Grant On the Ides of March five years ago, Johns Hopkins University Press released Collecting Shakespeare: The Story of Henry and Emily Folger, the first biography written about the founders of the Folger Shakespeare Library. During the...
From: Blogging Shakespeare on 5 Apr 2019

Shakespeare: Print and Performance

The 1599 Second Quarto of Romeo and Juliet For many years, even centuries, there was a huge divide between Shakespeare’s plays as they were performed and how they appeared in print. Scholars wrestled with the numerous different editions of the...
From: The Shakespeare blog on 16 Oct 2017

Donald Trump and Shakespeare

A scene from the New York production of Julius Caesar Shakespeare’s fascination with politics can be seen in many of his plays, not only those directly based on British history. The Roman plays too examine the workings of power, looking at how...
From: The Shakespeare blog on 18 Jun 2017

Prose and Verse in the 1608 King Lear Quarto: An Alternative Explanation

I’ve spent a good deal of time and energy writing about why Brian Vickers’s The One King Lear is such a terribly misguided book — both in an almost endless string of tweets and in a forthcoming long-form essay for the Los Angeles Review...
From: dispositio on 13 Aug 2016

The Merry Wives of Windsor in the Royal Library

The title page of the First Quarto of The Merry Wives of Windsor The story that Shakespeare wrote The Merry Wives of Windsor in response to a request from Queen Elizabeth to see Falstaff in love goes back a long way. In the prologue to his 1702 adaptation...
From: The Shakespeare blog on 20 Feb 2016

Alas, poor Yorick: the spell of Hamlet

The title page of the Hamlet First Quarto On 26 July 1602 Shakespeare’s play Hamlet was registered with the Stationers’ Company in London. It’s an important date, but has done little to settle the burning question of when Shakespeare’s...
From: The Shakespeare blog on 27 Jul 2015

c17 Quarto Playbooks at Northwestern

In keeping with the “Renaissance Books, Midwestern Libraries” project I’ve been running this summer, today I’m going to discuss a couple more early printed items in Northwestern’s Special Collections library. The subject...
From: Vade Mecum on 19 Aug 2014

The Rape of Lucrece

Title Page of the 1616 quarto edition of The Rape of Lucrece Exactly 420 years ago, on 9 May 1594, Shakespeare’s long poem The Rape of Lucrece was registered before being published later that year. In the dedication to the poem he had written the...
From: The Shakespeare blog on 9 May 2014

Closer to performance? Some thoughts on the Philaster quartos

There are so many debates about the form of the printed playtext – what it represents, how close to the stage it is, where it comes from, to whom it can be ascribed.  Much criticism and theatre history was written in the twentieth century to re-situate...
From: Tympan and Frisket on 11 Jul 2013

“Let’s Make a Quarto” Family Workshop at a Folger Traveling Exhibit

Back in 2011, the 400th anniversary year of the King James Bible, the Folger partnered with the Bodleian Library at the University of Oxford, with assistance from the Ransom Center at the University of Texas at Austin, to produce the NEH-funded exhibition...
From: Folger SHAKESPEARE LIBRARY on 7 May 2013

Bursary Funded Research: a visit to the Houghton

Reblogged from Malone Society: The Malone Society offers bursaries, fellowships, and grants to support research. This blog post is the first in a series of pieces written by scholars who have been awarded funding from the Society. It was written by C....
From: fourth degree burn on 17 Apr 2013

The National Art Library, V&A

I took this photo from the windows of the silver collection, and then ended up sitting just behind the window of that third big arch on the left. One of the best things about editing a play for which a handful of quartos are extant is that I get to visit...
From: fourth degree burn on 11 Nov 2012

Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.