The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "queenship"

Your search for posts with tags containing queenship found 15 posts

Katherine Howard or Anne of Cleves?

Above: Portrait of a Lady, perhaps Katherine Howard; Royal Collection TrustA portrait miniature in the Royal Collection Trust, dating to circa 1540, has for some time been identified as a likeness of Katherine Howard, fifth queen consort of Henry VIII,...
From: Conor Byrne on 24 Sep 2021

Longest-Serving English Consorts (1066-1547)

This blog post will explore the longest-serving English consorts in the period 1066-1547, a period that commences with the Norman Conquest of England and ends with the death of Henry VIII.1) Philippa of Hainault (c. 1314-1369), wife of Edward IIITenure...
From: Conor Byrne on 12 Sep 2021

Lady Katherine Grey

My article about Lady Katherine Grey, younger sister of the executed Jane and a claimant to the throne of Elizabeth I (reigned 1558-1603), is available online at Team Queens. You can read it here: https://teamqueens.org/2021/08/12/lady-katherine-grey-tudor-heiress/
From: Conor Byrne on 12 Sep 2021

Conference Review – Kings & Queens 8, University of Catania

In this article, our social media editor Matt Firth reflects on his experiences at the 2019 Kings & Queens conference, hosted by Università degli Studi di Catania A reminder that, if you are thinking of turning your conference paper...
From: CERAE Impressions: A Blog on 12 Jul 2019

Impeaching the Queen of England (1643/4)

By Krista Kesselring; posted 9 October 2017. Trials of queens generally garner much attention, perhaps in part because they so often focus on sex. The trials of Henry VIII’s wives provoke enduring popular interest, most obviously. The adultery...
From: Legal History Miscellany on 9 Oct 2017

Kindle Countdown: Queenship in England

*Exciting Opportunity* If you own a Kindle, today and tomorrow, you can buy my book Queenship in England 1308-1485 for only 99p on Amazon UK and 99c on Amazon.com. It's a great deal and well worth taking advantage of.  Amazon UK link: https://www.amazon.co.uk/Queenship-England-1308-1485-Gender-Middle-ebook/dp/B01MT5OVGK/ref=la_B00MPFTO6E_1_2?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1493819053&sr=1-2...
From: Conor Byrne on 3 May 2017

3 April 1445: The Wedding of Henry VI and Margaret of Anjou

On 23 April - some sources suggest 22 April - 1445, Henry VI married Margaret of Anjou at Titchfield Abbey in Hampshire. The king was twenty-three years old and his new bride was fifteen. Margaret, who was born in Lorraine, had arrived in England on 9...
From: Conor Byrne on 23 Apr 2017

International Women's Day 2017

Today is International Women's Day. My research to date has primarily focused on late medieval and early modern women, specifically queenship. Earlier this year, MadeGlobal published my book Queenship in England 1308-1485, the culmination of years of...
From: Conor Byrne on 8 Mar 2017

Queenship in England

Happy New Year! I am delighted to inform you that my new book, Queenship in England, will be published on 12 January 2017 by MadeGlobal. The book is currently available on Amazon to preorder on Kindle, and will be available soon in paperback. You can...
From: Conor Byrne on 4 Jan 2017

Creating Harmonious Subjects? Songs for Queen Elizabeth I’s Accession Day

Queen Elizabeth I (1558–1603) was the first monarch whose Accession Day  on 17 November (the day when Mary I died and she became Queen) became a yearly occasion for celebration. Although never at official holiday, at Whitehall, noblemen honoured...
From: Early Modern English Music on 1 Jul 2016

A Book about a Queen's Books

From Palgrave Macmillan, a book to be published this August in the Queenship and Power series:Printed book and manuscript dedications were at the juncture between the actual interests and reading abilities of Tudor royal ladies and the beliefs and hopes...

Music in Elizabethan Court Politics

My book Music in Elizabethan Court Politics has just been published! In the book I investigate the political roles of music (particularly secular music-making) within the court of Queen Elizabeth I. IT’s begins by considering the musical reputation...
From: Early Modern English Music on 30 Jan 2015

The Earliest Surviving Song in Praise of Queen Elizabeth I?

The earliest song in praise of Queen Elizabeth I is not a madrigal, lute song, consort song or anthem – the genres most widely associated with her reign – but a modest broadside ballad by one William Birche. His A Songe Betweene the Quenes Maiestie...
From: Early Modern English Music on 17 Nov 2013

Motets and Monarchy: The Politics of Early English Music Printing

The politics behind Vautrollier’s Recueil du mellage d’Orlande de Lassus (1570), and Byrd and Tallis’s Cantionae Sacrae (1575)\nIn 1570 Thomas Vautrollier printed his Recueil du mellange d’Orlande de Lassus, a collection of Lassus’s...
From: Early Modern English Music on 19 Feb 2013

Music and Authority in the Reign of Queen Elizabeth I

I was researching musical performances by Queen Elizabeth I (1558-1603) when I stumbled across John Davies’ poem, ‘To the Queen’ in the front of Roy Strong’s The Cult of Elizabeth (p.10).Davies’ poem characterises Elizabeth’s...
From: Early Modern English Music on 9 Nov 2012

Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.