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Your search for posts with tags containing relationships found 32 posts

What’s blood got to do with it? Reimagining kinship in the Age of Enlightenment

To pass the time on a recent rainy drive to Pittsburgh with my family, we listened to an episode of The Ezra Klein Show that consisted of a conversation between Klein and American novelist Richard Powers. Powers is the author of, among many things, The...
From: Voltaire Foundation on 25 Nov 2021

Table Talks II: New Approaches to Romantic Studies and Society

Please enjoy the recording of our second in the series of Table Talks, featuring children’s literature, labouring-class poetry, feminist polemic, creative life writing, Romantic poetry, and silver fork fiction: Thanks to Felicity James, Adam...
From: The Romantic Ridiculous on 21 Jun 2021

Eighteenth Century Agony Aunts, Part Two

We continue our look at the replies to questions by our eighteenth-century agony aunts, we hope you enjoy them. We have to confess, the first one caused much hilarity here at All Things Georgian, both in terms of the question and its response! Be...
From: All Things Georgian on 3 Apr 2018

Eighteenth Century Agony Aunts

We came across the following publication which caused us more than a little amusement, so we thought we would share a few snippets with you. The Gentleman and Lady of Pleasure’s Amusement published 1759. The book is a series of questions about...
From: All Things Georgian on 29 Mar 2018

Mothers of self-invention

I issued the usual complaint to my wife: “I don’t know what to write about.” Henry VIII was in the books but no inspiration was coming to me. I had come down with a bad case of PPMD: Post-play Moping Disorder. Symptoms include: writer’s...
From: Shakespeare Confidential on 14 Mar 2017

Everything and nothing: Hamlet, Part 3

January 4 Words, words, words. (2.2.192) It was my father’s birthday. From the basement, where the guest suite is, I heard him come home from work. He sounded tired. It sounded like a long day. I heard him answer a FaceTime video with my oldest...
From: Shakespeare Confidential on 21 Feb 2017

Everything and nothing: Hamlet, Part

December 31 – January 1 Alas, poor Yorick. I knew him, Horatio – a fellow of infinite jest, of most excellent fancy. He hath borne me on his back a thousand times; and now, how abhorred my imagination is!…Where be your gibes now, your...
From: Shakespeare Confidential on 20 Feb 2017

Everything and nothing: Hamlet, Part 1

December 28 O, what a rogue and peasant slave am I! (2.2.527) “I think I’m going to switch back to beer,” I announced, not they cared. My wife, brother, and I were chatting after our Christmas dinner, observed. In the fridge, there...
From: Shakespeare Confidential on 19 Feb 2017

Past, present, and macaroni salad: Henry VIII

“We’ve got…,” I said with a suspenseful pause as I pulled tupperware out of the reusable grocery bag, “Monte Cristo sandwiches and macaroni salad.” “Holy shit. Thanks, man,” my friend said.  “Thank...
From: Shakespeare Confidential on 2 Feb 2017

Harrumphing Hellenes and house-hunters: Troilus and Cressida

Me, shouting from upstairs to my wife in the kitchen: “Because African leopards are going extinct! Because facts are going extinct! Because, because…bullshit!” Thersites, railing against Patroclus: “The common curse of mankind,...
From: Shakespeare Confidential on 7 Dec 2016

Tampons, induced vomiting, and Shakespeare’s King John

He greeted me as he always does when I come home. Through the frosted glass of the front door, I could see him perched atop the shoe bench, a shaggy black mass shimmying in excitement as I unlocked the door. He twirled. He jumped. I gave him some pets....
From: Shakespeare Confidential on 23 Oct 2016

The Merchant, er, Mooch, of Venice

“I will do anything, Nerissa, ere I will be married to a sponge,” Portia tells her personal assistant early on in Shakespeare’s The Merchant of Venice (1.2.83). This sponge is one of her suitors, a heavy-drinking German. But she does...
From: Shakespeare Confidential on 15 Oct 2016

Sitcom chivalry: The Two Noble Kinsmen

And they say chivalry is dead. I’m not talking about holding the door open for women. Nor standing up when they enter or leave the room. Picking up the check at dinner? Nah. Walking closest to the curb. Un-uh. I’m talking about ruining holiday...
From: Shakespeare Confidential on 12 Oct 2016

Wine, women, and tray tables: The Sonnets

I knocked over my wine, sending droplets on the opening lines of “Sonnet 15”: When I consider every thing that grows Holds in perfection but a little moment… You can say that again. That was like 3 euros of wine. A little bit splashed...
From: Shakespeare Confidential on 26 Sep 2016

Through the pint glass: All’s Well That Ends Well

Of course, I decided to pick a fight the last night he was in town. My brother and I were at John Morrissey’s, a divey local not even a block from my house. It serves the cheapest Guinness I’ve yet found in Dublin. He’d been in town...
From: Shakespeare Confidential on 8 Sep 2016

The Merry Wives of Windsor, the doltish husbands of Dublin

“‘Make sure you lock up the bikes,’” my friend parroted his wife while we were stopped at a traffic light. “What does she think we were going to do with them? Park them in the Liffey?” “And what was this about:...
From: Shakespeare Confidential on 14 Aug 2016

Over and over and over: The Tragedy of Othello

Today I can laugh about it. She ended up dumping him and came out as a lesbian, I learned through the grapevine years later. And when asked to explain that semester out of school, I usually just leave it as a “personal matter,” as if it was...
From: Shakespeare Confidential on 29 Jun 2016

The art of artifice (and the artifice of art): The Life of Timon of Athens

The Life of Timon of Athens isn’t a particularly celebrated play in Shakespeare’s oeuvre. Many critics think its language and plot don’t quite stack up to the Bard’s usual standards. Some argue it was never finished. Others conclude...
From: Shakespeare Confidential on 5 Jun 2016

Glass houses and jelly meerkats: King Lear, Part

I have a lot of questions about King Lear. Like what is wrong with these people? “Which of you shall we say doth love us most?” a retiring King Lear asks his three daughters, Goneril, Regan, and Cordelia, as he divides his kingdom up among...
From: Shakespeare Confidential on 22 May 2016

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Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.