The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "republicanism"

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Your search for posts with tags containing republicanism found 77 posts

Eugene Sue’s “Mysteries of the People” (1848): “The Branding Needle” and the First French Commune | Stephen Basdeo

By Stephen Basdeo, a writer and historian based in Leeds, United Kingdom. This article follows on from previous posts on Eugene Sue’s epic socialist novel Mysteries of the People. Previous discussions on the first six volumes can be found here: ...

Beyond the Old White Men: Women in English Republicanism

‘The history of old white men is on its way out’, a friend of mine and I agreed on a recent Zoom call. He is working on seventeenth-century English royalist thought, I’m working on republicanism. We’re both interested in gender issues and wondering...
From: The History Woman's Blog on 26 Nov 2021

Delacroix’s Greek Revolution

Age of Revolutions is happy to present its “Art of Revolution” series. You can read through the entire series here as they become available. By Nicolai von Eggers Visitors who enter room 700 at the Louvre, a large red hall on the first floor...
From: Age of Revolutions on 1 Nov 2021

Lord Bolingbroke: A Tory Thinker that Jefferson Truly Admired

Jefferson scholars all knew that Thomas Jefferson often disparaged the label “Tory” in his political writings. For Jefferson, being called a Whig would signify... The post Lord Bolingbroke: A Tory Thinker that Jefferson Truly Admired appeared first...

Eugene Sue’s “Mysteries of the People” (1848): “The Poniard’s Hilt” and the Arrival of Feudalism in France | Stephen Basdeo

By Stephen Basdeo, a writer and historian based in Leeds, United Kingdom. This article follows on from previous posts on Eugene Sue’s epic socialist novel Mysteries of the People. Visionary French Author Eugene Sue (Stephen Basdeo Collection)...

Monarchy vs Republic (1848) | François-Vincent Raspail

F. V. Raspail The following lines were written by the French physician François-Vincent Raspail (1794–1878) while he was imprisoned in Château de Vincennes because of his role in the French Revolution of 1848. Titled ‘Many Kinds of Monarchy—One...

A Call to the People (1850) | Anonymous

The following pro-democracy hymn was written by a writer known only as “Bandiera” and was published in the Red Republican magazine (29 June 1850 issue), edited by George Julian Harney. It has been transcribed by Stephen Basdeo. People of England!...

Eugene Sue’s Epic Socialist Novel “The Mysteries of the People” (1848): “The Casque’s Lark”

By Stephen Basdeo, a writer and historian based in Leeds UK. Eugene Sue Introduction In 1848 Karl Marx and Friedrich Engels wrote the Communist Manifesto. In it, they argued that all history was essentially the history of class struggle....

History of the British Aristocracy: Part One (1849) | Anonymous

The following first chapter in the history of the aristocracy, titled ‘The Aristocracy: Its Origin, Progress, and Decay’, was written anonymously by someone named “Alpha,” and was subsequently published in Reynolds’s Political Instructor in...

A Song for the Democracy (1839) | H. Vincent

This poem, originally written by H. Vincent, was first published in 1839 in Hugh Williams’s National Songs and Poetical Pieces. Called ‘A Song for the Democracy’, radicals, particularly in the 1830s and 1840s, often used the definite article before...

Last of the Queens and Kings | Armand Carrell

This poem titled ‘The Last of the Queens and the Kings’ was originally written in the 1830s French by Armand Carrell and later translated into English and published in Red Republican.[1] It has been transcribed by Stephen Basdeo specially for this...

A Chartist History of England (1849-50): William Rufus | Edwin Roberts

Little is known of Edwin F. Roberts (1818–64), who is the author of this long-running series, originally titled A New History of England, and serialised in Reynolds’s Political Instructor between 1849 and 1850.[1] That he was a Chartist and republican...

George W.M. Reynolds’s Italian Chartist Republic

By Stephen Basdeo George William MacArthur Reynolds (1814–79) was one of, if not the, biggest-selling novelist of the Victorian era. Born in Kent, he was originally destined for a career in the navy, which was the path followed by his father. Upon...

Working with Translations in the History of Political Thought

The Europa regina from Sebastian Münster’s Cosmographia (C16th).   As part of my project on ‘English republican ideas and translation networks in early modern Germany’, I look at the ways in which ideas from the English...
From: The History Woman's Blog on 4 May 2021

The Revolutionary Life of Eugene Sue (Part I)

By Stephen Basdeo To us, therefore, who have known and loved him—who are proud of having been his dearest and best affection, who mourn him in so many ways—to tell Eugène Sue’s life story—a joyful, restless, then grave...

“Mysteries of the People” (1848): Eugene Sue’s Epic Socialist Novel

By Stephen Basdeo In 1848 the master of the “mysteries” novels, Eugene Sue, began the weekly serialisation of a new novel: Mysteries of the People. It was a chronicle of a proletarian family, and their descendants, who participated in all...

Patriots without Borders: Towards an Atlantic History of the Risorgimento during the Age of Revolutions

By Alessandro Bonvini On June 23, 1848, Giuseppe Garibaldi embarked for Nice with Adrea Aguyar, a formerly enslaved Black man from Uruguay, to participate in the First Italian War of Independence. Aguyar was a member of a battalion of newly freed people,...
From: Age of Revolutions on 5 Apr 2021

Defending the English Revolution in the German Lands

A German translation of Marchamont Nedham’s True state of the case of the Commonwealth (1654). In his study of the contemporary reception of the English Revolution in the German-speaking lands of continental Europe, Günter Berghaus stresses...
From: The History Woman's Blog on 29 Mar 2021

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Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.