The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "ridiculous"

Your search for posts with tags containing ridiculous found 8 posts

Sir Tremendous Longinus and the Ridiculum

It just sounds so rude! Sir Tremendous Longinus: somehow priapic and vaginal at the same time. It is also by far the funniest thing about the Pope, Arbuthnot, and Gay’s play Three Hours After Marriage in which Sir Trem appears as ‘the greatest critick...
From: The Romantic Ridiculous on 21 Jul 2021

Table Talks II: New Approaches to Romantic Studies and Society

Please enjoy the recording of our second in the series of Table Talks, featuring children’s literature, labouring-class poetry, feminist polemic, creative life writing, Romantic poetry, and silver fork fiction: Thanks to Felicity James, Adam...
From: The Romantic Ridiculous on 21 Jun 2021

Half Time Oranges

I realised this morning that I’ve finished the first year of my two years of AHRC-funded research on ‘The Romantic Ridiculous’ project! I’m about to go on the holiday we booked last January for Easter 2020 then rebooked for Easter 2021 as ‘it...
From: The Romantic Ridiculous on 29 May 2021

May the Fourth Be with Me

Last night, I decided that the time had come. I had waited long enough. As soon as the house was quiet and I could be certain that everyone was asleep, I put on my brand new maroon coat — I decided that maroon was going to be my colour — my...
From: The Romantic Ridiculous on 4 May 2021

That Old Conservation Feeling

Congratulations to the New Generation Thinkers of 2021! You can find out more about them here, but this is about my own ridiculous failure to make it as one. It probably didn’t bode well for my chances that I started to think up a blogpost on...
From: The Romantic Ridiculous on 18 Mar 2021

Table Talks I: New Approaches to Romanticism and the Natural World

Check out the recording of our first Table Talk: Table Talks I Recording Thank you to my six wonderful interlocutors: Liz Edwards, Kitty Shaw, Dana Moss, Bethan Roberts, James Lesslie, and Tom Marshall. Thanks also to our fantastic audience...
From: The Romantic Ridiculous on 17 Dec 2020

‘Don’t Be Ridiculous!’

A ridiculous review of Robin Stevens’ A Murder Most Unladylike Mystery series Robin Stevens, Death Sets Sail (London: Puffin, 2020) Daisy Wells and Hazel Wong, schoolgirl detectives in the late 1930s (the Golden Age of both Crime Fiction and...
From: The Romantic Ridiculous on 18 Aug 2020

Two Cautionary Tales of Gun Control

My thanks to Gorges for this link below. http://gorges-smythe.blogspot.com.au/2012/12/two-cautionary-tales-of-gun-control.htmlhttp://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424127887323777204578195470446855466.html?mod=WSJ_Opinion_LEADTopAll this evidence,...
From: A Woodsrunner's Diary on 30 Dec 2012

Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.