The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "riot"

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Your search for posts with tags containing riot found 407 posts

November 1

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago this week? “American FLINT GLASS.” When Parliament repealed most of the duties on imported goods imposed by the Townshend Acts, leaving only the duty on tea in place, most American...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 10 Nov 2021

“The Ghost of Menno Simons”

For a little fun on Hallowe’en 2021, this post provides highlights from a short pamphlet written in the voice of a ghostly Menno Simons. The Dutch-language pamphlet is anonymous and undated, but it from the early 1780s. This was the era of the Patriot...
From: Dutch Dissenters on 31 Oct 2021

This Week on Dispatches: David Price on Thomas Knowlton’s Revolution

On this week’s Dispatches, host Brady Crytzer interviews author and JAR contributor David Price on the brief, but memorable, contribution of Thomas Knowlton to... The post This Week on Dispatches: David Price on Thomas Knowlton’s Revolution appeared...

September 18

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago this week? “Peaceable, yet active Patriotism.” Yesterday, the Adverts 250 Project featured Robert Bell’s subscription notice for Blackstone’s Commentaries on the Laws of England...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 18 Sep 2021

Patriotism and Profit

BOOK REVIEW: Patriotism & Profit: Washington, Hamilton, Schuyler & the Rivalry for America’s Capital City by Susan Nagel (Pegasus Books, 2021).   In Patriotism &... The post Patriotism and Profit appeared first on Journal of the American...

A Reassessment of the Martyrdom of Regulator James Few

Many early histories of the War of Regulation, which culminated in the May 16, 1771 Battle of Alamance, paint a picture of a Regulator... The post A Reassessment of the Martyrdom of Regulator James Few appeared first on Journal of the American Revolution.

Review: Vermont’s Ebenezer Allen

Vermont’s Ebenezer Allen: Patriot, Commando and Emancipator by Glenn Fay Jr. (Charleston, SC: The History Press, 2021) Ethan Allen, the militia leader who shares credit... The post Review: Vermont’s Ebenezer Allen appeared first on Journal of the...

Love of Country (1867) | Anonymous

The following poem, ‘Love of Country’, was written anonymously and printed in Reynolds’s Miscellany on 13 July 1867. It does not celebrate any one country in particular, but is applicable to all people who love their home country. It has been transcribed...

North Carolina’s Response to the Battles of Lexington and Concord

Rumors roared throughout the Colonies in the spring of 1775. From Watertown, Massachusetts, with an earnest pen, a letter was taken down at 10... The post North Carolina’s Response to the Battles of Lexington and Concord appeared first on Journal of...

This Week on Dispatches: George Kotlik on Bartram’s Travels in Florida

On this week’s Dispatches, host Brady Crytzer interviews historian of colonial Florida and JAR contributor George Kotlik on botanist William Bartram’s travels in East Florida during... The post This Week on Dispatches: George Kotlik on Bartram’s...

John Adams on Hutchinson’s Death

John Adams was caustic about a lot of people, including sometime political allies. But his longest and deepest hatred appears to have been for Thomas Hutchinson.Adams’s early legal and political career coincided with Hutchinson’s rise to being chief...
From: Boston 1775 on 4 Jun 2021

The Death of Thomas Hutchinson

Thomas Hutchinson was born on 9 Sept 1711 to a wealthy Boston merchant. His father valued education so much that he funded the building of a new Latin School in the family’s North End neighborhood. Naturally, of course, that school benefited the Hutchinson...
From: Boston 1775 on 3 Jun 2021

The Capture of North Carolina Governor Thomas Burke

When the vote came on Tuesday, July 26, 1781, before the House’s evening adjournment, it was Thomas Burke’s turn to hold the Executive office... The post The Capture of North Carolina Governor Thomas Burke appeared first on Journal of the American...

Massachusettensis and Novanglus: The Last Great Debate Prior to the American Revolution

When John Adams returned to Massachusetts after the session of the First Continental Congress, he was surprised to find that there was growing opposition... The post Massachusettensis and Novanglus: The Last Great Debate Prior to the American Revolution...

The British Constitution in Crisis: The Gordon Riots and the American Revolution

By Lauren Michalak In the first week of June 1780, London was nearly brought to its knees by a week-long riot. Rioters destroyed all but one prison, attacked the properties and bodies of judges and politicians, and attempted to sack the Bank of England....
From: Age of Revolutions on 3 May 2021

Circa 1775

For Patriots Day, I endeavored to find Salem houses built in 1775, but it turned out to be a bit more involved task than I envisioned. I was just going to walk around and look at the Historic Salem, Inc. plaques, then I decided to consult the Massachusetts...
From: streets of salem on 18 Apr 2021

April 15

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today? “The most strict Compliance with the Non-Importation Agreement.” Colonial merchants and shopkeepers often included introductory remarks about the origins of their imported...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 15 Apr 2021

The Fury of the Betrayed: What Attacks on Capitols in Montreal (1849) and Washington (2021) Tell Us About the Long History of Anti-Democratic Sentiment in North American Political Culture

Dan Horner On the night of April 25, 1849, a riled-up crowd of protesters showered Montreal’s parliament building with rocks, stormed through its front doors, and set the building—a repurposed public market in the city’s west-end—on...
From: Borealia on 13 Apr 2021

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By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.