The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "riots"

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Your search for posts with tags containing riots found 238 posts

“They must be Sent directly, or by God, I should never See the Morning”

Last week I guessed that the Boston Chronicle’s 24 July 1769 account of Newport’s Liberty riot reflected the perspective of William Reid, commander of that sloop for the Customs Commissioners. It turns out we have Capt. Reid’s description...
From: Boston 1775 on 26 Aug 2019

The Beeline March: The Birth of the American Army

On a late spring afternoon in 1825, the two Bedinger brothers—Henry and Michael, old men now, seventy-four and sixty-nine respectively, proud immigrants from Alsace-Lorraine—commanded... The post The Beeline March: The Birth of the American...

Visit Newport in the Summer of 1769, 24 Aug.

On Saturday, 24 August, the Newport Historical Society will host a living-history exploration of “Life During the Burning of H.M.S. Liberty.” This is the society’s Sixth Annual Living History Event, and its presentations bring in top-notch...
From: Boston 1775 on 21 Aug 2019

The Burnings of the Liberty

The Boston Gazette was the town’s staunchest Whig newspaper, quick to attack royal officials and to defend locals against charges of unrest. But printers Edes and Gill weren’t so protective about other communities.The Boston Gazette’s...
From: Boston 1775 on 20 Aug 2019

Captain Reid versus Captain Packwood

Yesterday I shared an official description of the confrontation in Newport, Rhode Island, over the Customs ship Liberty on 19 July 1769. By “official” I mean that the town’s Whig leadership supplied that text to the Newport Mercury....
From: Boston 1775 on 19 Aug 2019

The Second Liberty Riot

I’ve been focused on events 250 years ago this week in Boston, but it’s time to look in on other events in New England.You may recall how in June 1768 the Customs office in Boston confiscated John Hancock’s sloop Liberty on charges of...
From: Boston 1775 on 18 Aug 2019

Their Pockets Filled with Paper Dollars: The Raid on Little Ferry

During the American Revolution, Bergen County, New Jersey, was flooded with combatants from all over America, many of whom had never been to the... The post Their Pockets Filled with Paper Dollars: The Raid on Little Ferry appeared first on Journal of...

Revolting Women

By Stephen Basdeo This is a précis of an article written by Sylvia Federico. Please click the link and cite Federico’s well-researched article in any work of your own. Do not cite this blog post. In the summer of 1381, the common people...

Update on the Slave Auction Memorial at Faneuil Hall

Earlier this month I wrote about the Slave Auction Block memorial that artist Steve Locke had proposed for installation outside Faneuil Hall. Locke’s Kickstarter campaign was successful in surpassing its goal for initial fundraising with a couple...
From: Boston 1775 on 22 Jul 2019

Les Habitants: Collaboration and Pro-American Violence in Canada, 1774–1776

The fleeting invasion of Canada in 1775, though often consigned to a bit-part in the American Revolutionary drama, proved vital to the emergence of... The post Les Habitants: Collaboration and Pro-American Violence in Canada, 1774–1776 appeared...

David Holmes, Timothy Barnard, and Questionable Loyalties

With the Revolutionary War in full swing by August 1776, George Galphin penned a letter to his nephew, Timothy Barnard. Galphin started his letter... The post David Holmes, Timothy Barnard, and Questionable Loyalties appeared first on Journal of the American...

The Road to Charleston: Nathanael Greene and the American Revolution

The Road to Charleston, Nathanael Greene and the American Revolution by John Buchanan (University Press of Virginia, 2019) John Buchanan’s latest account of the southern theater... The post The Road to Charleston: Nathanael Greene and...

George Farragut: The Epitome of an American Colonial

Jordi Ferragut Mesquida, better known by his anglicized name George Farragut, was the only known Spanish volunteer who fought under the American flag in... The post George Farragut: The Epitome of an American Colonial appeared first on Journal of the...

“A bayonet wrested from one of the pursuers”

Yesterday I quoted a deposition by a sergeant of the 29th Regiment about his run-in with John Ruddock, justice of the peace and captain of militia in Boston’s North End, 250 years ago this month. Justice Ruddock was used to getting his way in that...
From: Boston 1775 on 9 Jun 2019

When Wartime Riots Paralyzed London

On 2 June 1780, as I described yesterday, a crowd of over 50,000 people surrounded Parliament while Lord George Gordon presented a petition demanding a return to strictures on Catholics.The House of Commons dismissed that petition, and the crowd dispersed...
From: Boston 1775 on 3 Jun 2019

Quebec Town Major William Dunbar: Captured, April 1775

In early 1775, the town major of Quebec decided to pay a visit to Gen. Thomas Gage in Boston. William Dunbar had been an... The post Quebec Town Major William Dunbar: Captured, April 1775 appeared first on Journal of the American Revolution.

Grappling with Imperium in Imperio: Indivisible Sovereignty in Joseph Galloway’s British Empire

Although by 1775 hostilities between Great Britain and the American colonies had commenced, there were still those within the colonies who believed that the... The post Grappling with <i>Imperium in Imperio</i>: Indivisible Sovereignty in...

Southern Gambit: Cornwallis and the British March to Yorktown

Southern Gambit: Cornwallis and the British March to Yorktown by Stanley D.M. Carpenter (University of Oklahoma Press, 2019) In his recent book, Stanley Carpenter produced... The post Southern Gambit: Cornwallis and the British March to Yorktown...

The Mystery of “The Alternative of Williams-burg”

According to the Virginia Gazette between 400 and 500 merchants gathered in Williamsburg in early November 1774 and “voluntarily and generally signed” the Continental... The post The Mystery of “The Alternative of Williams-burg”...

Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.