The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "rome"

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Your search for posts with tags containing rome found 307 posts

Effervescence

I’ve been brooding on effervescence – which the Oxford English Dictionary surprised me by defining thus: ‘The action of bubbling up as if boiling; the tumultuous rise of bubbles of gas from a fluid; esp. as the result of chemical action’ –...
From: The Romantic Ridiculous on 26 Nov 2021

Romeo and Juliet (The Handlebards) @ Derby Theatre

It’s unusual to see a production of Romeo and Juliet in which Friar John emerges as the MVP. But for The Handlebards, this failed postman has rich potential. At the cell of Friar Laurence (Tom Dixon), Friar John (initially Lucy Green, later Paul Moss)...
From: The Bardathon on 25 Sep 2021

Romeo & Juliet @ Shakespeare’s Globe (livestream)

If there’s a play that can benefit from some shaking up, it’s Romeo and Juliet. During the pre-performance materials, members of the cast and crew of the Globe’s current production spoke of challenging the idea that the play is a love story. But...
From: The Bardathon on 8 Aug 2021

Romero-Díaz, “Las cartas entre la reina Mariana de Austria y sor María de Ágreda”

Nieves Romero-Díaz, “‘Lo que más nos importa’: religión y política en las cartas entre la reina Mariana de Austria y sor María de Ágreda,” Bulletin of Spanish Studies 98/3 (2021).
From: EM Spanish History Notes on 23 Jun 2021

Mary Shelley’s “The Last Man” (1826): An Abridged Version

The visionary writer Mary Shelley has a justifiable claim to have invented the genre of science fiction, notably with the publication of her novel Frankenstein; or, The Modern Prometheus (1818). Frankenstein was not her only novel, however, and Shelley...

Romeo and Juliet (National Theatre) @ Sky Arts

A group of actors gather in a rehearsal room, chatting and laughing; we cut to them sat in chairs, making up three sides of a large square. It looks like meet-and-greet day, only there’s no director, no box set to show. Instead, it’s one of...
From: The Bardathon on 5 Apr 2021

The Muslim historian who taught Renaissance Europe about Africa

For the first English translation of his most influential work, The Description of Africa, he is John Leo. His baptismal name was Joannes Leone de Medici, although he preferred its Arabic form, Yuhannah al-Asad. His birth name was al-Hasan Ibn Muhammad...
From: Mathew Lyons on 23 Feb 2021

Romeo and Juliet (National Theatre) @ The Dorfman, London (via Drama Online)

The National Theatre’s schools’ productions have developed in enormous sophistication over the last couple of decades, and it’s testament to their success as creative works in their own right that, not only are they getting runs at the...
From: The Bardathon on 19 Feb 2021

Romeo & Juliet (Metcalfe Gordon Productions)

For almost a year, now, there have been few opportunities to see new productions of Shakespeare inside a theatre; fewer still where actors are able to touch, to interact. Metcalfe Gordon Productions’ new theatre-film hybrid production of Romeo...
From: The Bardathon on 14 Feb 2021

Alchemist Cardinal

 Portrait of Francesco Maria del MonteOttavio Leoni (1578–1630)In the early seventeenth century, Cardinal Francesco Maria del Monte served as the unofficial Florentine cultural ambassador in Rome. He regularly entertained visiting dignitaries...
From: Conciatore on 3 Feb 2021

Eyes of a Lyn

 The seal of the Accademia dei Lincei.In the spring of 1612, Florentine priest Antonio Neri published his book on glassmaking. L'Arte Vetraria was the first printed book devoted to the formulation of glass from raw materials, but unfortunately...
From: Conciatore on 20 Jan 2021

On Juliet, matrons, and apostrophe

“Gallop apace, you fiery-footed steeds, / Toward Phoebus’ lodging; such a waggoner / As Phaeton would whip you to the west, / And bring in cloudy night immediately.” (R&J, 3.2.1-4) I spent the past week working through Juliet’s...
From: Thinking in Arden on 19 Dec 2020

Torricelli and Glass

Evangelista Torricelliby Lorenzo Lippi, circa 1647Evangelista Torricelli (1608–1647) is remembered as the inventor of the mercury barometer. Lesser known are a number of significant contributions he made to mathematics, astronomy and physics. There...
From: Conciatore on 20 Nov 2020

First Principles

First Principles: What America’s Founders Learned From the Greeks and Romans and How That Shaped Our Country by Thomas E. Ricks (New York, NY: Harper... The post First Principles appeared first on Journal of the American Revolution.

Fabergé and Purpurine

 Fabergé c.1900. Purpurine cherries,nephrite leaves, gold stalk, rock crystal pot.Peter Carl Fabergé is known the world over for producing elaborate jeweled fantasy eggs for the Russian royal family in the late nineteenth and early...
From: Conciatore on 9 Nov 2020

“Those Letters were not the writings he meant”

When William Story told Thomas Hutchinson in the summer of 1772 that he’d seen some problematic “writings” by the governor, he probably didn’t couch that in the form of a threat.Rather, Story likely used the language of the patronage...
From: Boston 1775 on 11 Oct 2020

Romeo and Juliet (Playing Shakespeare with Deutsche Bank) @ Shakespeare’s Globe

The Globe’s choice to release recordings of its Playing Shakespeare productions for young people alongside several of its summer season productions during lockdown has been an inspired choice. Fast, clear and full of energy, Michael Oakley’s...
From: The Bardathon on 28 Sep 2020

‘Beyond too much’: Shakespearean excesses in the 18th century

From the mid-1750s an unprecedented Anglophilia took hold of Europe. It manifested itself throughout Germany from the mid-1770s onwards with the rampant ‘Hamlet fever’, which succeeded and fed on an earlier ‘Werther fever’. It...
From: Voltaire Foundation on 25 Jun 2020

Eyes of a Lyn

The seal of the Accademia dei Lincei.In the spring of 1612, Florentine priest Antonio Neri published his book on glassmaking. L'Arte Vetraria was the first printed book devoted to the formulation of glass from raw materials, but unfortunately...
From: Conciatore on 3 Apr 2020

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Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.